C&R on old Harrington & Richardson revolver


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Rob P.
March 7, 2009, 01:31 AM
I have a line on an old H&R revolver. I believe that this revolver was made in 1902 based on research I've done on it.

It's a top break revolver with the rollmark on the top of the bbl: Harrington & Richardson Arms Co Worchester Mass. Patent Oct 4, 87; May 14 and Aug 6, 89; Apr 2, 95; Apr 7, 96.

The serial # is located on the underside of the top strap and cannot be read unless the cylinder is removed. The serial # is F26xxx. The serial number is NOT the 1940's-and-newer type which re-used the letter prefixes as it is too low numerically.

I did not write down if the bbl has a caliber rollmark on it. However, based on my research I believe that this revolver was mfg'd in 1902-1903 and is black powder ONLY. (BUT, at this point in time H&R was in process of switching from BP to modern smokeless powder so if the rollmark is there, it's the new type and all of this is academic as it will need an FFL to transfer)

So, my question...IF this revolver is BP only and based on a design that is pre-1898, is it legal to transfer without an 001 FFL? Something in my hind brain is telling me "yes, it is exempt" but then I'm getting a nagging echo of "no you need an FFL" too.

So, all you C&R types need to jump in here and let me know what's what.

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rritter
March 7, 2009, 02:22 AM
If it's a cartridge-firing revolver made after 1898, it needs an FFL transfer or you have to have a C&R FFL yourself to receive a 1902/1903 manufactured pistol. It's only the cap-and-ball (discrete component) black powder weapons that are exempt later than 1898.

Old Fuff
March 7, 2009, 10:57 AM
BATF&E maintain a list of post-1898 firearms that have been found to be eligible for C&R status because they have a greater value as a collectable and are unlikely to have any special attraction for anything else. The list consists of guns named specifically by manufacture, model, and sometime more. For example, some models of Winchesters with extra-short barrels, Smith & Wesson top-breaks, and certain Luger and Mauser pistols. The book is about ½ to ¾ inches thick. Individuals with C&R licenses can buy and/or trade these firearms.

I have no idea if the H&R revolver you are interested in is on this list, but you should check. If it isn’t, you (or someone) could apply to have it added, without much likelihood they’d refuse.

www.atf.gov

zoom6zoom
March 7, 2009, 11:27 AM
Yes, there is a list, but if it's over fifty years old it's a C&R, it doesn't need to be on the list.

Old Fuff
March 7, 2009, 11:41 AM
No, a C&R doesn't have to be on the list, which is updated from time to time. But if what you are interested in is on the list it make life a lot easier by removing any doubt.

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