What about 'frangible' rounds?


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fatfreddiescat
March 7, 2009, 08:30 PM
If you carry for self defense only, then it seems like you would (1) want to end any threat as soon as possible, and (2) take out any assailants ASAP. So is there an argument against frangible rounds? Or am I simply misinformed? I was told they go in at caliber size, turn to "sand" and exit like a cone?! Isn't that a good thing in terms of SD? Ultimate knock-down? Please let me know if I read this wrong, or if it is legal, and sensible.
Thanks,
F

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LightningJoe
March 7, 2009, 09:32 PM
Frangible rounds probably don't penetrate far enough, especially in situations in which you don't get an unobstructed, straight-on hit to the torso. Hollowpoints are bad enough in that area. Frangible rounds are worse.

Lone_Gunman
March 7, 2009, 09:33 PM
There are a few problems with these rounds.

First, they are exhorbitantly expensive. If you are using a semi-auto, most people want to do several hundred rounds to function test it. This is going to cost you hundreds of dollars to do.

Second, there is no significant data saying these rounds are better. No police agencies use them, and terminal effectiveness has never been studied in a way that allows one to draw a legitimate conclusion.

Third, they will not penetrate barriers. Even heavy winter coats will cause frangibles to begin to disintegrate.

Fourth, they may or may not penetrate deep enough into tissue to cause immediate incapacitation of your subject. A large superficial surface wound will be messy, but probably will not incapacitate your opponent.

flrfh213
March 7, 2009, 11:41 PM
i heard this type round is more for indoor ranges due to metal backing and indoor air quality, dont know for sure but i recall that much from asking an ammo dealer at the last gun show here in sw fla

B yond
March 8, 2009, 12:06 AM
According to cheaper than dirt frangibles are MORE deadly and will kill out target "dead right there..."
:rolleyes:

Lone_Gunman
March 8, 2009, 12:07 AM
No, this is marketed for defense. We are talking (I think) about Glaser and Magsafe ammo.

bdickens
March 8, 2009, 08:51 AM
Do any police departments use them?

There's your answer.

grumpycoconut
March 9, 2009, 01:33 AM
magsafe and glaser are a different breed of frangibles. Real frangibles (compressed powder in a jacket) are good for very limited purposes. If you are on the government's dime and are training with rifles in a shoot house rated for pistols or are doing a lot of shooting on steel at really close ranges they are ideal. Beyond that, why bother?

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