Need an assisted opener with index finger operation


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Grizfire
March 14, 2009, 04:43 PM
Well I broke the tip off my Kershaw leek and I'm now looking for a new EDC. I really like using my index finger to open the leek, so I'm looking for another knife with similar functionality. I find thumb studs to be cumbersome, although its a nice option to have on top of the index finger opening.

Can anyone direct me to other brands that are

1) assisted opener
2) operational with index finger

I would also like a better positioned lock than the Leek, such as thumb lock.

So far the Kershaw RAM seems to be what I'm looking for, but I want to make sure I didn't over-look another knife with a similar design.

Thanks

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poilu
March 14, 2009, 04:50 PM
kershaw lahar

RyanM
March 14, 2009, 06:12 PM
You can use your index finger to push on the thumb stud, if it's on the correct side (or ambi). That's how I open my Kershaw Whirlwind if I'm opening it left-handed.

hso
March 14, 2009, 06:25 PM
I assume you're looking for a assisted opener (AO) with a fin or flipper that sticks up through the frame.

What do you mean by "thumb lock"? All the AOs I'm familiar with use a liner lock or some variation of a cross lock.

The SOG Meridian and Twitch II have the configuration you're asking about.

Grizfire
March 14, 2009, 07:18 PM
I assume you're looking for a assisted opener (AO) with a fin or flipper that sticks up through the frame.


Yes exactly.

What do you mean by "thumb lock"?

I mean a lock in a position for easy manipulation with your thumb, such as this kershaw RAM. You can see the lock is up front where your thumb can get to it easily, whereas the leek has it in the butt of the knife where it is less accessible.

http://www.thekershawstore.com/v/vspfiles/photos/K1910CKT-2.jpg

Those SOG knives are just the type I'm looking for, thanks. Is the lock the round portion behind the blade?

Edit to reference pic: http://www.thekershawstore.com/Kershaw_R_A_M_Black_Plain_Knife_p/k1910ckt.htm

Grizfire
March 14, 2009, 07:24 PM
Is the lock the round portion behind the blade?

nevermind, I believe that is just a hinge. The lock on the SOG knives appear to be on the back. see...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7bFUZsCIpA

I think the lock in that position would make it difficult to use one-handed.

hso
March 14, 2009, 07:28 PM
Do you mean the "lawyer lock" and not the lock for the blade to lock it open?

In addition to SOG, Gerber's FAST Draw has a fin that is somewhat recessed, but easily accessible.

Grizfire
March 14, 2009, 07:32 PM
Do you mean the "lawyer lock" and not the lock for the blade to lock it open?

yep, the one that keeps the knife from opening. I once had my leek open in my in my pants pocket, so I would like to employ the "lawyer lock" to keep this from happening, but only if it is easy to manipulate.

mdao
March 14, 2009, 07:59 PM
The RAM is not an AO knife. The sliding button on the side actuates the lock for the blade.

hso
March 14, 2009, 09:56 PM
mdao is correct, the RAM is only a manual open (MO) flipper. It is not an AO.

high voltage
March 14, 2009, 11:38 PM
Zero Tolerance 300 series is a tank of a knife, but large, and pricey. Their 350 should be out soon, smaller and more affordable.

Limeyfellow
March 14, 2009, 11:41 PM
There are a few choices out there.

The Boker Trance has a flipper and a far more substantial blade for heavier work than the Leek. The AO flipper isn't as good in my opinion though.

Kershaw R.A.M. has a substantially tougher blade than the leek too, but the same smooth AO and is really nice. I prefer the lines of the Leek personally or the Blur, but it is a really nice knife and the clip isn't as nice. Still it would be my recommendation.

Grizfire
March 15, 2009, 02:55 AM
mdao is correct, the RAM is only a manual open (MO) flipper. It is not an AO.

Indeed. From the videos I've have seen of the RAM, it appeared AO. It looks rather effortless to open non-the-less.

thanks.

And LimeyFellow, thanks for telling me about the Boker trance. I'm already lusting over one of their fixed blades...

http://www.knivesplus.com/media/BK-BO2200.jpg

Grizfire
March 16, 2009, 12:28 AM
It appears that these Buck knives are assisted opening, have the index finger fin, and have the lawyer lock up front...

http://www.knifeworks.com/buckassisted-openingfolders.aspx


does anyone have any experience with any of these?

Thanks

Smith
March 16, 2009, 12:42 AM
I personally love the blade shape of the Kershaw Spec Bump.

TimboKhan
March 16, 2009, 12:59 AM
Lots of people seem to love the M-16 series from CRKT. I think they are nice enough knives, but I personally hate the flipper and thus never use mine. But, like I said, that is just me. Plenty of people love flippers. I prefer a thumb-hole.

DesmoDucRob
March 16, 2009, 11:41 AM
I love my M16 (13Z). I have lots of options of one hand-openers, and this one's my everyday favorite. Also, their customer service is great in my experience.

daveit
March 16, 2009, 06:35 PM
SOG Twitch & CRKT M16 are both good options

MaterDei
March 16, 2009, 06:48 PM
How did the Leek break? They might fix it for you. Personally, I own several of the Ken Onion AO knives and depending on what size you're looking for why don't you just get another? I've never had one open in my pocket but I have had the lawyer lock lock when it shouldn't have. I wish they would get rid of them.

RyanM
March 16, 2009, 07:08 PM
How did the Leek break? They might fix it for you. Personally, I own several of the Ken Onion AO knives and depending on what size you're looking for why don't you just get another?

Actually, come to think of it, when I sent my Chive in for a new torsion bar, they just replaced the whole thing. Dunno why. Kershaw would probably replace your Leek, no problem.

Smith
March 16, 2009, 10:11 PM
Although it seems that most people are very happy with their CRKT m-16's, I am not for several reasons.

The blade dulls extremely fast. The pocket clip comes loose over time. The screw holding the pivot system together loosens very quickly. The liner lock looks and feels flimsy. There is blade play in all directions when the blade is locked open. The liners are very thin and flexible.

That being said, mine is the cheaper M16-10KZ. Also, it was very inexpensive, it opens extremely fast, and the black finish has held up remarkably well.

At the least, the blade dulling and flimsy handle issues would be resolved by spending a bit more on the higher-end model. Maybe the loose pocket clip too.

Grizfire
March 17, 2009, 12:00 AM
how did the Leek break? They might fix it for you. Personally, I own several of the Ken Onion AO knives and depending on what size you're looking for why don't you just get another?

I broke it on a rock and broke the tip. I know I could probably have them replace it because I once stripped the clip screws and they sent me new screws (and a new pocket clip!). They have excellent customer service.

However, with the broken tip, I now have a knife AND a flat head screw driver and I would like to use this knife as a "around the house" knife. :D

I also have a Scallion and a Chive that live in my truck and tackle box, respectively.

I want to try something different from the Ken Onion knives and get some variety in my collection, and I want my EDC knife to be complete with a sharp point. :)

I found a browning that seems intriguing...

http://www.browning.com/products/catalog/knives/detail.asp?value=050G&cat_id=322&type_id=356

It says its assisted opening and it appears as if it has the index finger fin.

hso
March 17, 2009, 02:56 AM
It also says it is "420 steel", which isn't a good sign. That usually mean 420 J, an inferior steel. If it was 420HC, a reasonable steel, I would expect them to say that.

BTW, Ken doesn't work with Kershaw any more.

Oh, also, the M-16 isn't an assisted opener.

TimboKhan
March 17, 2009, 09:21 AM
Oh, also, the M-16 isn't an assisted opener

True. I sort of glazed over the AO part...

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
March 17, 2009, 12:32 PM
Although I love Kershaw AOs, particularly Leek, Needs Work, Spec Bump / Speed Bump, and Avalanche, and cannot say enough good about them (generally speaking), and of Kershaw's customer service, these don't have a locking mechanism thumb-operable like you're looking for.

One knife I like which has an additional lock which "locks the liner lock" is the CRKT "Desert Cruiser" (and some othe CRKT models) which have the "LAWKS" system I describe. BUT, these are not AOs, unfortunately. They are very smooth and have flippers however.


P.S. The "Spec Bump / Speed Bump" (and similar) designs from Kershaw cannot - repeat, can NOT be relied upon for hard use. Over time, their locking system can easily fail, due to the very small amount of engagement, combined with buildup of pocket lint, etc. in there, and the weak spring. This is potentially a fantastic design, if they would just make the channel for the locking stud about 1/32nds" longer, and the spring for the stud a smidge stronger.

Upriver
March 17, 2009, 05:21 PM
Although it's not technically a "flipper," any of benchmade's "axis" lock knives can be deployed quickly with the index finger on the off-side. Worth fondling, anyhow, to see how it fits your hand. The bonus is that the same function locks the knife, instead of having a separate safety. I don't do liner-locks, and the "lawyer lock" on the kershaws has always been awkward to me. Just my $.02.

Regards,

U

conw
March 18, 2009, 08:56 PM
My buddy got a Kershaw Skyline from walmart for $35 and it is great. Low-profile but sturdy and perfectly suited for EDC. G10 handles and some kind of decent Sandvik steel, very sharp out of the box.

It is not true AO, but it is so smooth you'd think so watching it - it only takes a tap of the index finger and it goes through the full range of motion to snap open. Best part, you bypass the need for a lawyer lock because there is no chance of it springing open as it just relies on an extraordinarily smooth joint and a cool leverage design.

conw
March 18, 2009, 08:57 PM
This one is $60. You should handle one, they feel great. Tip up/tip down choice too, if you clip in the pocket or waistband.

http://www.knifecenter.com/knifecenter/kershaw/images/KS1760DAM.jpg

Smith
March 18, 2009, 10:00 PM
This one is $60. You should handle one, they feel great. Tip up/tip down choice too, if you clip in the pocket or waistband.



Which one is that?

TimboKhan
March 18, 2009, 11:55 PM
Which one is that?

I am going to assume you didn't see the picture?

Smith
March 19, 2009, 08:33 PM
I am going to assume you didn't see the picture?

I did see it.

So. . . Which one is it?

conw
March 19, 2009, 09:21 PM
That's just the Damascus version of the Kershaw Skyline I mentioned earlier (on page one).

Price difference: $35 vs $60. You won't regret the $35 if you go that route, but if you have the $60 to spend you definitely won't regret it. I haven't had a damascus steel knife, but being higher-carbon lower-chromium, if it's anything like my chrome vanadium and other carbon steel knives it's bound to be awesome. The $35 one comes with and holds a great push cutting edge too, which is what most people find impressively sharp. I'm sure if you resharpened it with a coarser stone when the time came it would be an impressive slicer (rope tasks, boxes, etc) as well.

Just go handle one in Wally World and if you like the look and sound of the damascus version, order it on the web.

conw
March 19, 2009, 09:27 PM
http://www.articlesbase.com/equipment-articles/modern-damascus-steel-555084.html

^ modern damascus steel article

http://www.knifecenter.com/kc_new/store_detail.html?s=KS1760DAM

^ damascus skyline (remember, regular is available at walmart)

http://www.knifecenter.com/kc_new/store_detail.html?s=KS1725CB

^ just for fun, a much larger and heftier but similar blade. I found it a bit big for my tasks (mostly food and packaging oriented to be honest) but if you need more of a chopper and something with some heft and toughness, this could be your knife. The one I linked to has CPM-D2 for the edge and Sandvik 13c26. The CPM-D2 should be awesome.

I am steering you toward carbon steel blades because I prefer them...if you haven't tried one, give it a go. They sharpen easier (think 4-10 strokes per side vs 50-100!) and hold an edge as well or better...and tend to be less brittle, too, in my experience.

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