Stupid question of the week: what's the dif between the 1892 and 1894 Winchesters?


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1KPerDay
March 24, 2009, 04:38 PM
:confused:

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rcmodel
March 24, 2009, 04:44 PM
The 92 is a shorter action designed to work with handgun length calibers such as the 25-20, 32-20, 38-40 & 44-40 WCF.

The 94 is a longer action designed for the 30-30 and similiar length cartridges.

There are also several differances internally, including the way they lock the bolt shut.
The 92 uses twin locking blocks dovetailed into the bolt.
The 94 uses a single locking block behind the bolt.

Both are equally strong actions as lever-guns go.

92:
http://www.collectorsfirearms.com/admin/product_details.php?itemID=27934

94:
http://www.collectorsfirearms.com/admin/product_details.php?itemID=24428

rc

MMCSRET
March 24, 2009, 07:23 PM
Good answer except; early 94s also used twin locking bolts. That was changed to single in 1964 (if my info is correct) making the 94 stronger. The 92 was discontinued prior to the change. and the replicas in production today copy the original except in caliber of chambering. Originals were never chambered in 45 Colt.

Vern Humphrey
March 24, 2009, 08:02 PM
Good answer except; early 94s also used twin locking bolts. That was changed to single in 1964 (if my info is correct)
Nope. The 94 was the experimental platform for re-design for ease of manufacture, but that was in '63, not '64. And '94s have always had a rear-locking bolt. I carried a '94 on my saddle many a mile in the '50s, and have seen many '94s made before I was born.

The '94 always had a rear-locking bolt.

SwampWolf
March 24, 2009, 08:41 PM
And the 92 always had twin (double) locking bolts. Can't explain it any better than rcmodel did.

MMCSRET
March 24, 2009, 08:44 PM
I own a 94 in 38-55 from 1896 that has 2 locking bolts; very different from my two late model 94s, one from 1978 and one from 1995.

SlamFire1
March 24, 2009, 08:44 PM
Is one action "better" than the other?

huntershooter
March 25, 2009, 07:13 AM
The '92 is a scaled down '86 action, for use with pistol calibers (as stated).

Jim Watson
March 25, 2009, 09:09 AM
I own a 94 in 38-55 from 1896 that has 2 locking bolts;

Be interesting to see pictures showing those bolts in various positions and angles.

moooose102
March 25, 2009, 09:16 AM
there are only 2 stupid questions in the world. 1) is the one you already know the answer to, and your doing it "because" , waisting anothers time. and 2) the question you do not ask due to embaresment. i did not know the answer to your question. there are so many guns out there, that there are VERY FEW individules that know all the answers.

MMCSRET
March 25, 2009, 12:23 PM
I don't have a clue about how to do pictures on a computer and haven't owned a camera since 1970. The 38-55 is extremely worn and unsafe to shoot, I can push the bolt back and forth against the locking lugs .009" clearance, I guess you could call it free play. Headspace is nonexistant. Truely a wall hanger.

rcmodel
March 25, 2009, 02:01 PM
I own a 94 in 38-55 from 1896 that has 2 locking bolts;That would be news to a lot of Winchester historians and collectors!

Note the single locking bolt on this 1896 dated 38-55 94:

http://www.collectorsfirearms.com/admin/product_details.php?itemID=24738

rc

Vern Humphrey
March 25, 2009, 02:18 PM
I'd like to see a picture of that '94 with two locking bolts.:rolleyes:

MMCSRET
March 25, 2009, 02:51 PM
I went back and took it apart. You are right, I wasn't thinking in a straight line. It is different from my newer ones, as they did revamp some features. My apologies for misleading!!! I need to be reeducated from time to time and thanks to all of you for doing it.

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