Browning 1885 for Browning A-Bolt trade


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Maverick223
March 25, 2009, 10:30 PM
I currently own a Browning A-Bolt stalker/blue in 270WSM. It is in good condition (about 90%) with few rounds through it. Harris Bipod, extra mag, and 6-24x44 Barska/Leupold rings will be included. A local gunshop offered me a New-Manufacture Browning produced Browning Highwall in 45/70 for my trade plus $200.00 on my end. The Highwall is in 99% condition and has fancy checkered walnut stock. It has no scope or mount included. Is this a fair trade? If not what would be?

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Dlc43
March 25, 2009, 10:40 PM
I would consider it a good trade and spend the $200 on ammo or reloading stuff. I am partial to old west and classic old single shots though.
The high walls are bringing up to $1500-$1600 in some places because there is a large following for classic styled big bore single shots. I'd love to have the high wall personally.
It's not going to depreciate either. They don't make those anymore so it will only increase in value.

Maverick223
March 25, 2009, 10:56 PM
I would consider it a good trade and spend the $200 on ammo or reloading stuff
I worded it poorly...It was my A-Bolt and $200 for the Highwall. Sorry for the confusion, will edit original post. Thanks for the reply.

Maverick223
March 25, 2009, 11:03 PM
I'd love to have the high wall personally.
It's not going to depreciate either. They don't make those anymore so it will only increase in value.
My thoughts exactly, if I can just keep it in good condition. I have loved those guns since I was young and saw the movie "Quigley Down Under". I know it is not the same gun (Quigley used a modified Sharpe's 1874 with a 32" bbl chambered in 45-110 IIRC.

If purchased/traded I intend to place a leatherwood short malcolm on top to retain the authentic look of the piece whilst making it a bit more practical. Though I could always add a folding stock, picatinny forearm, and a couple tac lights. :D

Maverick223
March 26, 2009, 10:16 PM
Anyone else have any thoughts/opinions? I would love to hear more, as I may very well trade for it tomorrow.

Maverick223
March 27, 2009, 10:07 AM
BTT, anyone else?

alemonkey
March 27, 2009, 10:15 AM
I'm not sure on the fair market value of the two, but that could be ascertained through gunbroker.

Personally, I'd much rather have the Highwall. I love falling block single shots. It would be a great rifle, suitable both for big game hunting and BPCR silhouette competition. 45-70 is very accurate and a lot of fun to shoot, especially with black powder and cast bullets.

Jim Watson
March 27, 2009, 10:26 AM
Depends on what you would use the gun FOR.
.45-70 isn't considered much of an antelope rifle these days.
.270 is not much fun to target shoot with, not the stuff I do.
Dollar wise, I think it a reasonable trade.



Which variant Browning is it?
There is one that is modernized with snapping ejector, drilled and tapped for top scope mount, and no top tang to put a peep sight on.
There is the Traditional Hunter with about a No 3 tapered octagon barrel and Marble's tang sight (Or at least a place for it.)
There is the BPCR with heavy half octagon barrel and provision for vernier tang sight.


I don't hunt and my poor neglected .30-06 seldom gets out.
I shoot BPCR and have recently obtained the target model in .40-65; a fine rifle.

Maverick223
March 27, 2009, 10:39 AM
Thanks, Ale and Jim.
Which variant Browning is it?
Not sure, but It has an octagon bbl, and IIRC no sights and a provision for a vernier target sight mounted from the tang, so the second one I think. :confused: I will certainly check when I drop in this afternoon. Thanks for the info, is one worth more than another?

db_tanker
March 27, 2009, 10:50 AM
if I had the chance to pull the trigger on that trade it would have already happened.

I love single shots. I love 45-70's and other straight wall BP cases.

Of course, you are not me...how did it feel when you shouldered it? Are you going to go hunting with it? Do you realize that when you go hunting with a single shot it generally makes one alot more responsible of a hunter as you KNOW that the follow up shot is a bit longer than a bolt or a lever rifle? I dont' mean to sound like I am talking down to you, just making sure that you are aware.

I say do it IF you have the 200 laying around. High-walls are a bit more scarce than an A-bolt.


MTCW
D

Maverick223
March 27, 2009, 11:00 AM
I love single shots. I love 45-70's and other straight wall BP cases.
For relatively close ranges and devastating knock down...me too :D
Of course, you are not me...how did it feel when you shouldered it? Are you going to go hunting with it? Do you realize that when you go hunting with a single shot it generally makes one alot more responsible of a hunter as you KNOW that the follow up shot is a bit longer than a bolt or a lever rifle?
Great, yes, yes, and its purdy. I will likely hunt with it, but only at shorter (more typical) ranges of sub 150yds (probably 100yds or less). With decent shot placement I don't need a second shot. :D
I say do it IF you have the 200 laying around. High-walls are a bit more scarce than an A-bolt.
The $200 is not really a problem, but does eat into the sniper rifle glass fund. I think I will, and probably today, Thanks for the help.

alemonkey
March 27, 2009, 11:33 AM
Make sure you post pics! One of the guys who shoots BPCR at our club uses one, and does very well with it.

Maverick223
March 27, 2009, 07:58 PM
Traded...wow it's purdy. :) I'll post some pics when I borrow a camera from work on Monday (I don't have a digital). When I went in to give it a last look over I saw a few scratches, but then I blew them away (just dust); after that last look I could't leave it. I is a full octagon barrel without a tang, it does have irons (v-notch and blade), and is drilled and tapped from the factory for scope mounts.

On a different note I have just come to find out that the leatherwood scope that I have been scoping out for it is made in China :barf: . It is in no way tied in with the company that supplied optics to the US military in Vietnam. Any ideas on other scopes that look period, but have modern glass/coatings?

alemonkey
March 27, 2009, 09:49 PM
I've heard that the leatherwood malcom scopes, while chinese, are serviceable. Remember that they're external adjustment, so in theory they should be more robust.

Maverick223
March 27, 2009, 10:22 PM
I've heard that the leatherwood malcom scopes, while chinese, are serviceable. Remember that they're external adjustment, so in theory they should be more robust.
Thanks, Ale. Upon doing more research, I have read several reviews of the Leatherwood Malcolm Scopes, and most have been pretty good, whilst the other optics they manufacture have had poor reviews. Since they are the only manufacturer in my price range that builds a period scope (the MVA is costs too much), I think I may chance it.

Which power (they offer 3x and 6x) would you recommend? I will either go with the 17" 3x or the 18" 6x. P.S.: I wish they made an adjustable 2-7x that would be a no-brainer although likely not as robust.

alemonkey
March 27, 2009, 10:34 PM
Well, honestly, I've never used one, so I'm not sure about the best power. One of the guys who shoots at the same range as I has a 6x on a Pedersoli Sharps and it shoots well.

Maverick223
March 27, 2009, 10:42 PM
Well, honestly, I've never used one, so I'm not sure about the best power. One of the guys who shoots at the same range as I has a 6x on a Pedersoli Sharps and it shoots well.
Thanks, I was leaning towards the 6 power anyway, 4x wouldn't be too bad but 3 seems a bit light (my eyes aren't that great anyways).

Maverick223
March 30, 2009, 11:40 PM
As promised photos of the new 45/70...photos didn't come out as good as I had hoped. There isn't a scratch on it (dusty lens?).

Jim Watson
March 31, 2009, 08:05 AM
Spacing of the scope base holes is likely meant for modern internal adjustment scopes. Put a Leupold (Bushnell, Nikon, etc., etc.) 3-9X on it and go shooting. You will have a better sight at lower cost than the Communist Chinese Malcolm copy.

Unless you plan on getting into NRA BPCR competition, in which case the Malcolm would be the only thing cheaper than an MVA that you could use, being that the action lacks a tang to put a rear sight on.

alemonkey
March 31, 2009, 08:11 AM
That's pretty. If you do decide to go with the Malcom, I believe they mount in the dovetails where the iron sights are currently mounted.

Jim Watson
March 31, 2009, 08:31 AM
The short version mounts to dovetail blocks like a Unertl. Their illustration of a new made Winchester (same as Browning) looks like the rear block goes on the receiver ring where a modern scope base would mount and the front block goes in the open sight dovetail. They have gone to a lot of trouble to minimize the gunsmithing to use those scopes.

A modern 1" tube, 40mm objective scope would be better for shooting, you would be paying a price for the period look. Friends have RHO and MVA scopes of more than twice the price of the Leatherwood, and while they are clear, they are not very bright and the field of view is small.

Maverick223
March 31, 2009, 09:50 AM
That's pretty
Thanks, Ale

If I go with an optic, it will likely me the Leatherwood as a MVA (or equivalent) is not in the budget for this gun. I may take another look at a Leupy VXI in Blue finish, but I don't think it will fit the gun. I need to drag it to Bass Pro and look at it side by side with the leupy. I wish I could find an old Unertl for cheap. I think one would look pretty good and it was good enough for the USMC. In hindsight I don't think the Leatherwood could be that bad as it is fixed power, although that limits the rifle a bit. Unless I find a good deal on a used scope (like a Unertl) I will likely wait a few months before getting glass, due to a recent purchase :uhoh: (Desert Tactical-SRS in 300WM) and that is going to eat up a lot of my cash for a while (currently deciding whether to drop $3k on a scope for it) :eek: .

alemonkey
March 31, 2009, 08:44 PM
Ok, so next question....you are going to shoot black powder and cast bullets, right? Only way to go :D

Maverick223
March 31, 2009, 09:40 PM
Ok, so next question...
Yes...well...and no. I may play with BP but I have no plans to use it regularly. As far as cast boolits go, when I get a press and start reloading, I most certainly will. They will be perfect for target shooting and blowin' up melons. I think I will stick to nitrocellulose for hunting purposes though. What nitro factory loads would you guys recommend? I am currently shooting Hornady Leverevolution, and have heard of weak loads from Remington, but would like to experiment with heavier slugs. :D

alemonkey
March 31, 2009, 10:02 PM
I've never shot factory ammo through my 45-70, but when I used to shoot smokeless in it I had really good luck with 28 grains of Accurate 5744 and a 405 cast flat nose bullet.

To be honest, black powder really is not much more of a hassle than smokeless in these guns. It's actually easier to clean black powder fouling than to clean copper fouling from jacketed bullets. The difference is just that you need to do it right away when you get done shooting.

With falling block actions it's easy to push a patch through from the breech. I just push through a patch soaked in soapy water, then a pass or two with a brush to break loose any leading, and then soapy patches until they come clean (usually takes about half a dozen or so). Then a dry patch to get rid of moisture, and one soaked in a natural (non-petroleum) oil.

Maverick223
March 31, 2009, 10:14 PM
Thanks for the tips Ale, I will have to give it a try.

browningguy
March 31, 2009, 10:57 PM
Congrats, I love my 1885 in 45-70. A very accurate and classic design. Mine has the factory peep sight and shoots very well out to the limits of my tired old eyes.

Maverick223
March 31, 2009, 11:33 PM
Mine has the factory peep sight and shoots very well out to the limits of my tired old eyes.
Thanks, may have to look into one. Is it dovetailed or a vernier peep made for a tang?

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