Vietnam era "Special" weapons


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Vachss
March 28, 2009, 03:58 PM
Some great ingenuity went into these puppies..

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v694/panzer32/guns/bigguns2.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v694/panzer32/guns/bigguns.jpg

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PAshooter
March 28, 2009, 04:12 PM
Not a rifle, but this one's always been a favorite of mine:

http://www.gunslot.com/pictures/smith-wesson-aai-quiet-special-purpose-revolver-qspr-tunnel-revolver-usa

shotgunjoel
March 28, 2009, 04:15 PM
where's the barrel on the 870?

H2O MAN
March 28, 2009, 04:35 PM
1969 - These U. S. Army 25th Infantry Division snipers in Viet Nam are equipped
with M14 rifles that have Sionics SS-1 suppressors and AN/PVS-2 night scopes.

http://www.imageseek.com/m1a/gallery/albums/service/25ID_Vietnam_HuntingClub.jpg

Rubber_Duck
March 28, 2009, 04:43 PM
That pump-action 40mm grenade launcher is wicked. :evil:

Oro
March 28, 2009, 05:11 PM
I've always wanted an M-79, ever since I saw "Apocalypse Now" - which I had the great pleasure of seeing in the theater on it's opening weekend (wide release) in 1979. Mind blowing.

And re: Vietnam individual special weapons, don't forget the Hush-Puppy, too. Kinda sad, actually.

PS - I also fully dig the grunt on the left's footwear. Tres chic, really. Has he not heard about shistosomiasis? I always guard against that when in south Asia.

JimJD
March 28, 2009, 05:16 PM
Not a rifle, a pistol. But still interesting.

During the Vietnam conflict, the US navy sponsored development of the silenced pistol for use by its SEAL teams. Nicknamed the hush-puppy because of its intended function of killing enemy watch dogs, this modified version of the steel framed Smith & Wesson model 39 pistol was put to other clandestine used as well. Called the mark 22, mod. O pistol by the navy, the hush puppy had a slide lock to keep the mechanism closed and silent while firing. It fired a special green tipped 9mm parabellum projectile weighting 10.2 grams (158 grains that yielded a muzzle velocity of 274m.p.s. (900 f.p.s), below the speed of sound. Use of standard supersonic ammunition quickly degrades the effectiveness of the silencer insert. With subsonic ammunition, an insert is good for about 30 rounds; with standard velocity cartridges the insert may have to be replaced after six shots. Official navy designation for the silencer is mark 3, mod.0 . Ammunition and replacement silencer parts are supplied as accessory kit MK26, Mod.0. Each accessory kit includes 24 9mm pistol cartridges MK144, mod.0 and one silencer tube insert.
All the work on the model 39 hush-puppy was carried out by Smith & Wesson before the end of 1968. Subsequently, Smith & Wesson provided two prototype 13-shot pistols made from stainless steel. These weapons were improved to overcome problems such as extractor breakages, which had been experwnced with the model 39. This modified pistol in a slightly different form as later commercially marketed as the model 59 Smith & Wesson 9mm parabellum pistol.


Combination over all length 12 inch
Total weight with out magazine 34 oz

WOX-1A silencer
Over all length 5”
Total weight 8oz

WOX-13A pmm pistol
Over all length 8 ”
Total weight with out magazine 26 oz

WOX-13A pmm pistol and WOX-1A silencer
Combination over all length 12 inch
Total weight with out magazine 34 oz


Form:
Small arms of the world
Page 175 –177
By Edward Clinton Ezell
Publisher: Stackpole Books; 12th Rev edition (December 1983)

61chalk
March 28, 2009, 05:32 PM
Great pictures guys, I got to use the m203 grenade launcher back in the early 80's, have you ever noticed that when Chuck Norris uses them they make a bigger explosion?

PAshooter
March 28, 2009, 05:36 PM
Great pictures guys, I got to use the m203 grenade launcher back in the early 80's, have you ever noticed that when Chuck Norris uses them they make a bigger explosion?

BTW - the same guys that developed the QSPR (see my post above) also developed the M203.

Matrix187
March 29, 2009, 12:34 PM
The Seals used whatever they wanted pretty much. I know one weapon they used was a pump action ithaca 12 ga with a drum mag.

Rifleman 173
March 29, 2009, 03:02 PM
Looks like the guys from the 25th Infantry are using XM-21 sniper rifles. The XM-21 did not have an attachment on it for a bayonet while the M-14 did. I know, I used an XM-21 myself for about 7 months while sniping over there.

.45Guy
March 29, 2009, 03:22 PM
I'll have to do some digging, but I'm pretty sure I've read an article about a guy using a .444 Marlin over there.

Leadbutt
March 29, 2009, 05:09 PM
444 was the one that Jerry Shriver was supposed to have taken in to pop bunkers with ,and was the one he jumped in when they lost him

Greenmachin3
March 31, 2009, 02:44 PM
How about the .50 Flechette sabot rifle?

http://pics.gunbroker.com/GB/122223000/122223452/pix1017941250.jpg

dogtown tom
March 31, 2009, 04:14 PM
Matrix187: The Seals used whatever they wanted pretty much. I know one weapon they used was a pump action ithaca 12 ga with a drum mag.
:scrutiny: Pics?:scrutiny:

How & where would you mount a drum mag on a bottom loading/bottom ejecting Ithaca?







.

sinistr
March 31, 2009, 07:20 PM
thanks dogtown,i read that and was pretty puzzled myself.i just couldn't figure out why,talk about obvious!

Gordon
March 31, 2009, 07:28 PM
So MUCH BS about Nam stuff. I DID see the silent M-29 .44 mag once though, but of course never fired it. I was never around any SEALS so I don't know what they had.

HB
March 31, 2009, 08:14 PM
I had a Vietnam vet as a rifle coach not to long ago and he had very similar sandals as the guy pictured above. He said he bought them from some kid in vietnam, who apparently made them from dumped Army truck tires! Thought they were pretty cool :D

About the weapons, seems like there was a lot of different stuff floating around over there but I'd imagine most of it is legend. Outside of issued M-16's, M-14's, 1911's, shotguns, and S&W revolvers, most stuff was probably pretty rare. And the occasional M70 Winchester and M40 sniper rifles.

fattboyzz
March 31, 2009, 08:35 PM
this is a thread I can come back too alot and enjoy !! and this may seem sappy too some but those men in the pic have put a lump in my chest with the state of affairs of the US currently .....sorry if I got off topic guys !!!

Gewehr98
March 31, 2009, 08:45 PM
How did that mag-fed 870 really work?

The mag sits well forward of the bolt, shell lifter, and ejection port.

For a shell to be stripped from that forward-mounted mag and fed into the chamber, both the bolt and chamber would have to also sit in a forward position, locking up in battery somewhere ahead of the forward edge of the magazine.

Unless that mag just dumped its rounds into the standard 870 tubular magazine just forward of the receiver, I can't see how it would work.

What am I missing here? :scrutiny:

CTW
March 31, 2009, 10:48 PM
I was always fond of the Stoner LMG.

TrapperReady
March 31, 2009, 10:49 PM
G98 - It looks to me like that 870 is set up so that the top shell in the magazine would be in the same place that the rear-most shell in a tubular magazine would be. When you pull the forearm to the rear, it would dump it in on top of the carrier and it would be chambered when you slid the forearm forward.

I'd be more curious to know if the thing was even remotely reliable and what the handling was like.

SDC
March 31, 2009, 10:55 PM
I've seen pictures of some pretty weird stuff, ranging from the QSPR seen above (it apparently worked fairly well, only the ammunition itself had a high failure rate), to the Vietnam equivalent of the "Liberator" pistol (the "Deer Gun" in 9mm, dropped after they decided that most of them would end up in the hands of the VC anyway), to something that was supposed to be the Vietnam version of the DeLisle Carbine, a Rem 700 chambered in a short 458 Winchester cartridge and with an integral suppressor. I've also seen something that looked absolutely PAINFUL to shoot, a 40mm M79 sawn off to about 5 inches, with only a pistol-grip left to hold onto.

jojo200517
March 31, 2009, 11:00 PM
I almost fell out of the chair at the sight of the pump action grenade launcher. I never liked the single shot ones or the revolverish style (to thick IMHO) but pump action. DROOLS

Zak Smith
March 31, 2009, 11:08 PM
We made a replica of the Sionics suppressor for a special customer. It was a pretty cool project. I don't think he's taken photos of the entire M14 project, yet, however.

Kind of Blued
April 1, 2009, 12:12 AM
The genesis of the M3 w/ night vision was in Korea, but I think they saw some use in Vietnam, as little as it may have been. Feel free to fill in the details if you have them.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/14/M1_z_celownikiem_noktowizyjnym.jpg

It always looked a touch top-heavy to me... :uhoh:

Prince Yamato
April 1, 2009, 12:12 AM
I had a Vietnam vet as a rifle coach not to long ago and he had very similar sandals as the guy pictured above. He said he bought them from some kid in vietnam, who apparently made them from dumped Army truck tires

You can buy them new off the internet from shops in Vietnam and Cambodia. They are called "Old Ho's" or "Ho Chi Minh" sandals. They're very popular with hippies, stoners, and "mother earth" types.

jpwilly
April 1, 2009, 01:49 AM
Sweet...CHINA LAKE PUMP. I need on of those to protect the hood!

Today's China Lake NATIC 40mm looks like this

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_0xCx5PWyccM/SPB51T3tasI/AAAAAAAAAs4/9BaLXkIBR6E/s400/300px-M-32

Jubjub
April 1, 2009, 06:16 AM
I knew a guy who was in the Navy, on river patrol boats. His personal weapon was an M2 carbine with the stock cut off and the barrel cut down to about 12". Didn't bother to put a front sight back on it, as he loaded 50% tracers. Spray and pray, all the way.

H2O MAN
April 1, 2009, 09:18 AM
Rifleman 173

Looks like the guys from the 25th Infantry are using XM-21 sniper rifles.
The XM-21 did not have an attachment on it for a bayonet while the M-14 did.
I know, I used an XM-21 myself for about 7 months while sniping over there.

The modern version is called the Crazy Horse M21A5 and it was recently dubbed (http://www.tactical-life.com/online/special-weapons/smith-enterprise-crazy-horse-m21a5-762x51mm/) the Ultimate semi-auto sniper system!

No bayonet lug needed.

http://www.athenswater.com/images/Ft.Bliss-2.JPG

Gewehr98
April 1, 2009, 02:41 PM
The modern version is called the Crazy Horse M21A5 and it was recently dubbed the Ultimate semi-auto sniper system!

Who, exactly, dubbed it that? :scrutiny:

Jeff White
April 1, 2009, 06:51 PM
Quote:
The modern version is called the Crazy Horse M21A5 and it was recently dubbed the Ultimate semi-auto sniper system!

Who, exactly, dubbed it that?

Not the US military. The M21 was a failure as a sniper weapon because it required too much armorer support to maintain the accuracy that was required for the mission. The receiver was glass bedded into the stock and it required a trip to support for cleaning. The program was ended way before enough NM M14s were converted to M21s to meet the requirements for sniper rifles and the M1D soldiered on in most units until the adoption of the M24 in 1989.

HB
April 1, 2009, 07:07 PM
You can buy them new off the internet from shops in Vietnam and Cambodia. They are called "Old Ho's" or "Ho Chi Minh" sandals. They're very popular with hippies, stoners, and "mother earth" types.

He was none of the above! I'd say he was a good shot, a loud mouth, and tough old man. I liked him. Had some other interesting items including a picture of him holding a revolver to a skull (:what:), a little crossbow, and some frag from his leg...

Back to the gun topic, does anybody know what types of revolvers were used in Vietnam? Where they issued or personal weapons?

HB

H2O MAN
April 1, 2009, 07:10 PM
Jeff White

The M21 was a failure as a sniper weapon because it required too much armorer support to maintain the accuracy that
was required for the mission. The receiver was glass bedded into the stock and it required a trip to support for cleaning.
The program was ended way before enough NM M14s were converted to M21s to meet the requirements for sniper rifles
and the M1D soldiered on in most units until the adoption of the M24 in 1989.

Much has changed since the 1980's. The Modern M21A5 Crazy Horse requires no glass bedding.
This ain't the M14 of the past, the Modern M21A5 Crazy Horse is both reliable and accurate.
It gets even better when you put the action into a SAGE EBR chassis stock :)

Jeff White
April 1, 2009, 07:15 PM
Much has changed since the 1980's. The Modern M21A5 Crazy Horse requires no glass bedding.
This ain't the M14 of the past, the Modern M21A5 Crazy Horse is both reliable and accurate.
It gets even better when you put the action into a SAGE EBR chassis stock

What military has adopted it?

H2O MAN
April 1, 2009, 07:18 PM
What military has adopted it?

The US ARMY has been using Crazy Horse M14s (http://www.smithenterprise.com/products02.html) in small, but growing numbers since about 2004.

http://www.smithenterprise.com/images02/11-CH-005.02.jpg

Jeff White
April 1, 2009, 07:29 PM
The US ARMY has been using Crazy Horse M14s in small, but growing numbers since about 2004.

Just because they bought a few doesn't mean it was adopted. There is a big difference between being procured in limited quantity and being adopted. My respect for Smith Enterprises just went way down seeing that they have stooped to claiming their weapon has been type classified and adopted. Looks like units have spent their own money on them. Something that has gone on quite a bit since the GWOT started.

It was not selected as the semi-automatic sniper system. That contract went to Knights Armament for an SR25 variant IIRC.

I can show you examples where individual units have bought M16 type weapons from various manufacturers, but that doesn't mean they were ever adopted.

H2O MAN
April 1, 2009, 07:37 PM
I didn't say it was adopted. Nobody except yourself mentioned that it had or had not been adopted.

Your claim that anyone other than yourself has stated the rifle has been adopted is false.

Jeff White
April 1, 2009, 07:46 PM
I didn't say it was adopted. Nobody except yourself mentioned that had or had not been adopted.

I specifically asked what military had adopted it and you replied the US Army.

Your claim that anyone has stated the rifle has been adopted is false.

You stated it was adopted in the very next post. If you didn't mean to state it was adopted, why did you imply that it was by answering my question with the reply that the US Army had?

H2O MAN
April 1, 2009, 08:00 PM
Your stooping to word games is telling...

Deer Hunter
April 1, 2009, 08:06 PM
H20 never said adopted, but you did allude to it, here.

small, but growing numbers since about 2004.

Jeff's got the right idea though. The rifle has not been adopted. I think that was a smart move. Sticking with the AR-type will streamline logistics.

Don't assume he's stooping to word games. He made an inference of your allusion.

H2O MAN
April 1, 2009, 08:13 PM
I alluded to nothing, I just stated the facts.

Jeff is stooping to cheap word games and he is dead wrong.
He knows it, you know it... everyone knows it.
Your siding with him only makes you complaisant.


Go ahead and twist my words for your own petty enjoyment - I stand by the facts that I have clearly stated.

Jeff White
April 1, 2009, 08:19 PM
What am I wrong about?

Deer Hunter
April 1, 2009, 08:20 PM
Calling people things isn't going to solve an internet scuffle.

I can see where Jeff took your statement. Not saying he's right, but I do see where he's taken it.

He's not right in his assumption about your statement, he is right about his view on the M14 in combat as the US Army's sniper platform.

Or at least you wont be able to sway him one way or the other.

I agree with him on that point at least.

You're not

H2O MAN
April 1, 2009, 08:22 PM
Back on topic :neener:

This has to be one of, if not THE strangest "Special" weapon of the Vietnam era.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1168/1449819729_347fb9c022.jpg



BTW, I was once a flight instructor for a hovercraft manufacturer... what a great job!



.

H2O MAN
April 1, 2009, 08:40 PM
helz_mcfugly are ya talking about Madana and Angalina, or Vietnam era weapons? I hope i spelled those names right so i dont get critiqued.
heres a Vetnam shotgun. it'll blow your mind man :what:

helz_mcfugly, excellent postage and your speeling is just phine :evil:

Gewehr98
April 1, 2009, 08:49 PM
Who, exactly, dubbed it "The Ultimate Semi-Auto Sniper System"?

We all know you're the poster child here at THR for the M14/M1A family w/bolted on hardware.

That's no big deal, I've owned several in my time, competed at Camp Perry with others using the platform, and still have one in the collection.

But c'mon, stop blowing smoke up our posteriors and attribute the statement, will 'ya?

Even I know my beloved M14 platform isn't the be-all, end-all of semiauto sniper platforms come 2009.

"Ultimate"?

Sheesh...

helz_mcfugly
April 1, 2009, 08:55 PM
these guys did.
http://www.tactical-life.com/online/special-weapons/smith-enterprise-crazy-horse-m21a5-762x51mm/
:neener:

helz_mcfugly
April 1, 2009, 09:01 PM
H2O MAN. Ill trade ya autographed posters. lol

Funderb
April 1, 2009, 09:04 PM
Just curious...
How did that mag-fed 870 really work?

The mag sits well forward of the bolt, shell lifter, and ejection port.

For a shell to be stripped from that forward-mounted mag and fed into the chamber, both the bolt and chamber would have to also sit in a forward position, locking up in battery somewhere ahead of the forward edge of the magazine.

Unless that mag just dumped its rounds into the standard 870 tubular magazine just forward of the receiver, I can't see how it would work.

What am I missing here?


get out of the box! haha.
the pump is hooked up to an op rod which shoves the shell out of the mag into the feed ramp the same way a tube spring would.

Gewehr98
April 1, 2009, 09:55 PM
"Who?"

IOW, one article from "Tactical-Life" does not a highly-coveted, resounding success of a military weapons system make, hand-holding or otherwise.

Hell, I saw our guys using these .300 Win Mag BAR conversions during my government-paid vacation in Bosnia.

I could've sworn at the time that we had The One True Sword with respect to USGI semiauto snipers.

http://mauser98.com/interdiction.jpg


I wasn't even close. Good thing I didn't bet my military retirement pay on that one, eh?

I might've wished the above Armstech system would have been fielded in large numbers, but that didn't mean it happened.

Same for the venerable M14 in today's military. Jeff's right, it's a nice rifle, but the DoD's moved past it for better nowadays.

chuckusaret
April 1, 2009, 10:18 PM
How many of you Vietnam experts served in Vietnam???? Most of what I am reading has got to be hear say because a lot of it is nothing more than BS. I am not a weapons expert but I did get to see the majority of the weapons used in Vietnam during the 66 months that I was there. One thing I never heard was that the M21 was not a good sniper weapon. You also have to remember it was the best we had at the time, but has come a long way since then. The Special Forces has used a version of the M21 designated the M25 since the 1980's

H2O MAN
April 1, 2009, 10:30 PM
http://www.patriotshome.net/albums/Vietnam/M14_Sniper_Weapon.sized.jpg

H2O MAN
April 1, 2009, 10:32 PM
chuckusaret

I am not a weapons expert but I did get to see the majority of the weapons used in Vietnam during the 66 months that I was there. One thing I never heard was that the M21 was not a good sniper weapon. You also have to remember it was the best we had at the time, but has come a long way since then. The Special Forces has used a version of the M21 designated the M25 since the 1980's

Well said sir.

sinistr
April 1, 2009, 10:56 PM
this was a very interesting thread.....so if we could please get back on topic?i saw a program on seal weapons during vietnam including the hushpuppy and an m60 that they had removed the stock and the sights among other things to reduce weight.it reminded me of the book "rouge warrior"(sp?) as a seal when he talked about to eating the same food( to mask sweat and feces smell) and wearing the same footwear of the enemy.(like the ones discussed above) behind enemy lines.can anyone in the know elaborate further?also andy macnabe's "bravo two zero"was also fascinating in the methods they used to conceal their presence.

HorseSoldier
April 1, 2009, 11:34 PM
The Special Forces has used a version of the M21 designated the M25 since the 1980's

The M21 was innovative in a lot of ways for its time.

As far as the M25 goes, they may be out there somewhere, but I spent most of the last five years assigned to a Special Forces unit and never saw one -- M24s and SR-25s were the only 7.62x51 sniper guns we had (+/- a PSG-1 that occasionally got played with, though it's performance wasn't stellar) or anyone we trained with or worked with brought with them (+/- some M14s the USAF used for OPFOR weapons).

H2O MAN
April 2, 2009, 09:32 AM
M25 Sniper Rifle (http://www.patriotfiles.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=9068):

Originally developed by the 10th Special Forces Group at Ft. Devens, the M25 was built as a joint services system, meeting the needs of both
Army SF and Navy SEAL sniper teams for a semi-automatic sniper rifle built on the same lines as the match grade M14 and M21 semi-automatic rifles.

HorseSoldier
April 2, 2009, 11:39 PM
Right -- I just haven't seen any of them floating around. There may still be some kicking around, I just never saw one turn up. My guess is that the SR-25s made them extinct pretty quick, since we got SRs in abundance well before the M110 blipped up on Big Army's radar.

swgunner
April 4, 2009, 01:01 AM
Check out Uncle Sam's Tin Can Navy We have M14 and M25, though I cant remember the scope it was NV scope with pinhole cover for day and 10x magnification, nice system, took out some drug runner's outboards with it in 2002.

H2O MAN
April 4, 2009, 07:59 AM
HorseSoldier Right -- I just haven't seen any of them floating around. There may still be some kicking around, I just never saw one turn up.

My guess is that they were eventually replaced with Crazy Horse and EBRs.

lipadj46
April 4, 2009, 09:10 AM
I am not sure why people get so defensive about the M14 making it's little comeback. It's an awesome piece of technology from a bygone era that was written off but has proven it is still relevant today (ala B-52, A-10). You better believe if so many had not been chopped up back in the 90's you would be seeing many more of them today. Yes we know it is currently a stop gap measure until the SCAR H or M110 can be sorted out. While the military messes with those platforms getting the bugs out the M14 is there, it has been proven to work in adverse conditions in Vietnam and performs very well in a dessert environment.

I don't know why people take it so personally and cannot admit it is still relevant as a platform these days. After the whole modernization process you get just that a rifle that is accurate, durable and has all the rail space you would need. The whole "fragile glass bedding" argument is a bit outdated as stated above. The whole high maintenance argument is also strange, the M16 is a reliable platform because the military trains soldiers to clean their weapons like an OCD person washes their hands.

Anyways whatever I like the M14 and the AR (I own an M1A) but I think the SCAR H is the right "next" semi auto 7.62 Nato platform with it's piston gas system and modular design.

H2O MAN
April 4, 2009, 09:15 AM
lipadj46 I think the SCAR H is the right "next" semi auto 7.62 Nato platform with it's piston gas system and modular design.

Agreed.

TNThomas
January 1, 2010, 11:32 PM
Im going with the Rocket Pistol. If i remember right it was called the Gyrojet, or something to that order. I saw one at a gun show a few years back...

flintman
January 1, 2010, 11:46 PM
Never any combat here,just served from 1981-1986.
I reckon there were a lot of different weapons out there.As for me,when I got to my Army Reserve unit after my Junior Year in High School,I was very happy to be assigned a M203 under a Colt AR-15.:evil:

Speedo66
January 3, 2010, 01:46 AM
Don't know if they'd be classified as "special", but there were M-2 Carbines and Swedish K's being used by some Rangers early on when they were "advisors".

61chalk
January 3, 2010, 10:20 AM
Although the M14 might not be considered "special", Rock Island converted
1435 of NM quality rifles into M-21 sniper rifles...I would consider these to be
Special. They were used by U.S. Army snipers....an a salute to the Top sniper
of Vietnam with 109 confirmed kills...Staff Sgt. Adelbert F. Waldron III, 9th Inf.
He used the M-21 with a 3-9X Leatherwood ART scope, Starlight scope, an
used suppressors. His most talked about shot was a 900 meter shot from a moving
boat to the shore, killing an enemy that was firing on them. He past away in CA.
in 1995.

Dimis
January 3, 2010, 01:48 PM
wow who is urinating farther here?

seriously guys are any of you still in the military right now?
more specificaly an armorer or buyer for the military?

the army and marines are notorious for never throwning things away the M14 has seen modern battlefields by Marines for god sakes pick up a magazine and youll see them with "crazyhorses" that name wasnt a designation from the military BTW its from smith enterprises inc who helped convert alot of busted old and new M14s into new M21s and M25s for the army and marines

if you think that the military throws out old armament for new everytime the latest whizbang comes out then we would all have plasma rifles in a 40 watt range by now but they dont throw away anything hell just look at recent photos of military personel from afganistan iraq and elsewhere those guys may be carrying an old stevens pump action shotgun or a brand new M110 (which is the best SASS to date btw) military arms are issued in accordance to mission requirements not everyone gets a brand new SOPMOD M4 with all the trimmings hell last i checked camp lagune still had vietnam era M16s for qualifications now thats just sad

ok you can continue your watersports distance competition now

Justin
January 3, 2010, 02:49 PM
Dimis, Jeff White served in the US Army in Infantry. While I don't speak for him, I suspect he'd be happy to provide you with qualifications if you were to PM him.

So far as I know, H20 Man never served in the military.

61chalk
January 3, 2010, 03:33 PM
POST 67....?........I thought the OP was interested in 'special' weapons of Vietnam....
No one told me I had to be a Nam Vet to enter this thread. I did serve at one time...but I never saw combat....does that make me less a Vet in your mind??? Not sure who your talking about or why...feel free to PM me or anyone you are upset with an why....

Art Eatman
January 3, 2010, 05:36 PM
Oh, yuck. Enough.

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