2 resident permits, each from different state?


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.cheese.
April 6, 2009, 10:50 PM
I have a FL resident permit.

I will be moving to Minnesota for law school (unless something significant as far as wait-lists comes through).

My FL permit is not valid in Minnesota.

I will, in the meantime, get a non-resident permit from Utah which MN does honor to my knowledge.

Then, I will get a "resident" MN permit (supposedly there is no such thing as resident vs non-resident for MN permits.

Anyways, the house I live in will still belong to my family and I will of course visit. Should I transfer my FL permit to a non-resident permit, or can I leave it the way it is considering I still have a residence in Florida?

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.cheese.
April 7, 2009, 11:34 AM
Seems like everybody is like me on this one - stumped.

TexasRifleman
April 7, 2009, 11:37 AM
Do you know the exact definition of resident for both states and can you meet them both?

Just owning a home there isn't usually enough, there are requirements about how long you are there a year, lots of them requiring so many days IN A ROW etc.

I'd start there and see if I could even meet the requirements for that.

I've heard from folks with houses in 2 states that it's extremely difficult to meet both states requirements most of the time.

.cheese.
April 7, 2009, 03:56 PM
so... find the statutory definition of "resident" for each state.

good idea. Why didn't I think of that?

Trebor
April 7, 2009, 04:01 PM
Just be aware that is easy to trip yourself up and get in trouble by trying to be "cute" with residency issues in general.

States take a dim view when someone trys to "get around" a state law or, more often, a state tax by claiming residency in a different state.

The advice to check each state's laws is very good advice.

And, on the face of it, if each state only issues a "resident CCW" permit that means you really need to pick a state and only have the "resident" permit from that state.

If you had "resident" permits from two different states, either state could use the fact that you had a permit from the other state as a reason to make your resident permit in their state invalid.

In short, for a "resident" permit, pick a state and be done with it.

.cheese.
April 7, 2009, 04:24 PM
That's not the situation here.

The situation is - I HAVE a resident permit for FL b/c I've lived here for 26 years. I WILL be a resident of MN within a month or two and will be living there for most of the year for at least 3 years (4 if I do the JD/MBA), if not more.

The issue was simply whether or not to leave my FL permit alone, or to specifically contact the licensing division to have them change it. I am not trying to get 2 resident permits at the same time. The basis for a MN permit will be valid, and the basis for my FL has been valid. Whether or not I will have adequate grounds to leave my FL permit alone is what I'm trying to figure out.

I think TR's idea is what I need to do for Florida.

There supposedly is no "resident" vs "non-resident" differentiation for MN permits. So I'd end up with a Utah non-resident permit, a MN permit (generic), and then I have to figure out whether to change my FL permit's status.

si vis pacem
April 7, 2009, 04:32 PM
Well, your first month of law school will focus (in Civil Procedure) on what exactly "resident" means. Abandon all hope. :)

GRIZ22
April 7, 2009, 04:43 PM
It depends what your state says.

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