Military crimped brass question


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ScottsGT
April 21, 2009, 08:42 AM
I've got some .308, OK, 7.62X51 brass that I resized and popped out the primer on. I used a reamer to open up the outer edge of the primer pocket since I don't own a swager. Is this OK to do?
I was shooting some factory loaded Wolf brass .223 a few weeks back and had a primer come out and jam my AR-15. This has me wondering if I did the best thing by reaming the pocket instead of swaging it? I've fired about 20 of my reloads in my M1a with no problems so far.

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jmorris
April 21, 2009, 10:31 AM
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I've got some .308, OK, 7.62X51 brass that I resized and popped out the primer on. I used a reamer to open up the outer edge of the primer pocket since I don't own a swager. Is this OK to do?

Yes, it's just slower than swaging.

AirplaneDoc
April 21, 2009, 11:00 AM
I have a swager which is the best method, but did the same thing before I got one. I found that I run my loaded rounds in the tumbler for a few minutes, gets the lube off, and usually any loose pimers will show up from the vibration. Beats finding them in the magazine or down thru the rifle.

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rcmodel
April 21, 2009, 11:22 AM
and usually any loose pimers will show up from the vibration.That right there is what we call a CLUE you are going something wrong.

If you have primers falling out in the tumbler, you have a major problem with your modus operandi when seating them.

Whatever method you use to seat primers must give you enough "feel" to tell if a primer pocket is loose or not.

If all else fails, get an RCBS hand priming tool so you can "feel" whats going on.

rc

jmorris
April 21, 2009, 11:44 AM
That right there is what we call a CLUE you are going something wrong.


Or it's just the end of the life of the case. Most of the time a case will split first but not always. It happens even with cases that were never crimped (thus never cut or swaged).

I post load tumble to remove lube and to find loose primers as well. I don't find them that often but it only takes one to ruin a match.

rcmodel
April 21, 2009, 11:49 AM
I still contend your priming equipment should allow you to "feel" loose primer pockets when you seat the primers.

rc

ScottsGT
April 21, 2009, 12:25 PM
You tumble with a GOOD primer exposed to tumbling media? I personally never tumble after decapping. I've seen too much media clogging the primer hole, thus it would seem to block the charge coming from the primer?

USSR
April 21, 2009, 12:29 PM
...your priming equipment should allow you to "feel" loose primer pockets when you seat the primers.

+1.

Don

jcwit
April 21, 2009, 12:33 PM
I think he's talking about fully loaded rounds with powder and bullet in place.

jcwit
April 21, 2009, 12:34 PM
rc is dead on, on this, as usual.

AirplaneDoc
April 21, 2009, 01:08 PM
I still contend your priming equipment should allow you to "feel" loose primer pockets when you seat the primers.


This is absolutly correct and it goes for tight as well as loose. Too tight, crimp not out all the way, too loose primer will prematurley work loose.

X-Rap
April 21, 2009, 01:09 PM
You tumble with a GOOD primer exposed to tumbling media? I personally never tumble after decapping. I've seen too much media clogging the primer hole, thus it would seem to block the charge coming from the primer?
I think he means after loading, I run my loaded rounds for 30 min. to an hour to remove any lube or grit from the process and have found some primers that fall out. I agree with you in that running primed unloaded brass will likely cause trouble due to media getting stuck insde the flash holes.
I still contend your priming equipment should allow you to "feel" loose primer pockets when you seat the primers.
I agree and use a hand primer operation on first loaded mil. crimped brass to make sure the pockets are correct.

ScottsGT
April 21, 2009, 01:24 PM
OK. I see now. But I was also told that if you tumble loaded ammo that you can break down the granules of powder into smaller particles, thus changing the burn rate and causing inconsistancy in accuracy?

Walkalong
April 21, 2009, 01:33 PM
Malarky. :)

jcwit
April 21, 2009, 01:39 PM
Powder breakdown from tumbling? Not hardly, Think of all the jossling around ammo gets while being shipped. Let alone what military ammo goes thru.

I think this started with black powder, mayhaps it breaks down easier than smokeless. I do not know.

rcmodel
April 21, 2009, 01:44 PM
I don't know where it got started, but it wasn't black powder.

Those loads are always compressed and no gain movement is even possible.

Anyway, how do you think the factories get new ammo so nice & shiny?

They don't set around and polish each one by hand I betcha!

rc

jcwit
April 21, 2009, 03:00 PM
Could have started with the powder shaking around in an opened keg, or rattling around in a powder horn. One reason I,m thinking black powder is the large pressure differences encountered between 2X verses 3X verses 4X with the same amount measured.

I'm thinking back before cartridges.

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