Suggestions On Hunting Boots?


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sbarkowski
April 22, 2009, 04:20 PM
Its time for a new pair of hunting boots and I'm having a hard time finding a good pair. I was wondering if anyone had any suggestions. They need to be waterproof, insulated (200-400 gram Thinsulate max.) and above all they need to be light weight and comfortable for long hikes. I'd like to keep it under $200. Any suggestions are welcome. Thanks.

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Bogow
April 22, 2009, 04:32 PM
Danner makes a quality boot. The Pronghorns are light and very comfortable right out of the box.

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?id=0026711812166a&navCount=2&podId=0026711&parentId=&masterpathid=&navAction=push&cmCat=netcon&catalogCode=IK&rid=0180101070502&parentType=&indexId=cat600629&hasJS=true

Grizfire
April 22, 2009, 04:42 PM
I second Danner. I have a heavy, all leather pair that is still going strong after well over 10 years of use.

WardenWolf
April 22, 2009, 04:44 PM
Lowa Renegade, either the insulated or the Goretex (GTX) model. I've used these for years and swear by them. They're the most comfortable boot I've ever worn. I stick to Goretex and just wear warm socks inside them. They keep my feet toasty. They cost about $150 a pair, and are worth every penny.

CoRoMo
April 22, 2009, 05:23 PM
I've opted for 'Hiking' boots. I've found that the boots that are categorized as hiking boots are everything I was looking for in a hunting boot. Comfortable, waterproof, lightweight.

sbarkowski
April 22, 2009, 05:24 PM
lol, its funny you should mention Danner boots. Just before I came back to check on my post I was looking at these http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_-1_10001_99716_475004001_475000000_475004000_475-4-1

From Bass Pro

shaggy430
April 22, 2009, 07:25 PM
By far the best lightweight hunting boot I have ever had is the Lacrosse Hawk GTX. They weigh about as much as a pair of tennis shoes, are tough as nails, and are waterproof. Some of the best money I have ever spent.

By the way, a couple of years ago while elk hunting in Montana my friend had a pair of Danner Pronghorns blow out on him about 5 miles from the truck.

dakotasin
April 22, 2009, 08:20 PM
i'm no fan of danner pronghorns... i think they are pretty bad.

for boots i like, i've had fair luck with rocky, and meindl's are just awesome.

dakotasin
April 22, 2009, 08:22 PM
www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php/ubb/showflat/Number/2975584/page/1/gonew/1#UNREAD

here's a discussion on pronghorns on a hunting board i frequent.

jmr40
April 22, 2009, 09:02 PM
The Danner Pronghorns are one of the most comfortable out of the box boots made and a not a bad boot in my opinion. They are made in China however and because of the way the soles are made and the type of construction they are not going to hold up for years of hard use. Depending on how hard you use them they are probably good for 1 or 2 hunting seasons.

The best buy in the long term are the USA made Danners with sewn on Vibram lug soles. They will set you back close to $300, nearly 2X the price of the Pronghorns or many of the competion, but will cost less in the long run. I threw away a pair 2 years ago that I had worn for 13 years. I paid $165 for them. $165 divided by 13 years comes out to less than $13/year. A $150 pair of boots that only lasts 2-3 years will cost more in the long run.

I also wear good hiking boots at times and have had good service out of Asolo, Lowa, and Vasque.

WardenWolf
April 22, 2009, 09:46 PM
I should add that I actually wear my Lowa Renegades as everyday wear, because they're more comfortable than any shoe I've ever found.

BENELLIMONTE
April 22, 2009, 09:58 PM
Out of the 14prs of hunting,climbing, camping boots I own the 2prs I wear the most and are still functional are; Filson "Uplander" and an older pair of Red Head "Bone Dry Hunter".

Olympus
April 23, 2009, 09:56 AM
Danner makes a great product. But I'm sold on the Irish Setters! I've worn Rocky's for years and decided to try something different and switched to the Irish Setter. I'll never own another pair of Rocky's again! They're just as warm and are a lot lighter. They feel like a big tennis shoe instead of an actual boot. They're great for walking and just as warm for sitting still in a stand as well. I love mine!

Plus, Irish Setters are made by Red Wing which are AMAZING work boots!

MCgunner
April 23, 2009, 11:28 AM
I've got Magellan snake proof boots from Academy, about 70 bucks. I love 'em. They're hiking boot comfortable. It don't get that cold down here and they work great, are 100 percent tested waterproof even in above ankle deep water and muck and I had a snake hit the right one last spring and walked away from it, 4 ft rattler. They've already paid for themselves way I see it. This might not be a concern to most of the country, but down here, I'll not wear anything, but snake proof boots. I used to put on my zip on leggin's, but they're not near as comfy. I wear the things occasionally on the motorcycle, too, make for very comfy and protective motorcycle boots and in Realtree camo, how stylish! :D

I don't think these things are insulated, but they're kinda hot in summer and work fine down to freezing for me sitting on the stand. I've not had the occasion to use 'em in much colder weather as it just doesn't get that cold down here. Main thing is they're very comfy to walk in and rugged as heck.

Kingcreek
April 23, 2009, 11:52 AM
I bought a pair of Danner pronghorns. wore them hiking/walking to break em in a little and then trashed them on a 5 day Utah elk hunt. Had to take a mid-day lunch break on the side of a mountain and glue a heel back in place with superglue (won't have a huntpack without it!). I still wear them some while bowhunting whitetails in Illinois I'm just walking to the stand and back but there are not a serious boot.
skip the pronghorns.

dat2
April 23, 2009, 01:13 PM
what ever you get, get them long enough before hunting season to break them in well enough to save your feet during hunting season

X-Rap
April 24, 2009, 11:58 AM
Most of the boots listed above are made in the Peoples Republic.
Don't expect to get the service or repairability of the old type of boots even though they cost the same.
I wear some of the asian junk but also have a couple pairs of older Filson boots that I wear when I know I have a long walk.

dagger dog
April 24, 2009, 04:34 PM
Browning offers a Thinsulate waterproof insulated kangaroo leather 10" crepe sole uplander , very light weight. They would be great for what they are intended flatland hunting.

They have a boulder Vibram soled cap toe speed lace for rocky places.

If price is not an object Chippewa makes a nice boot along with some of the Filson line.

BFE
April 24, 2009, 04:46 PM
Irish Setters hands down are the most of all you could look for in a boot.

stonecoldy
April 27, 2009, 12:36 AM
I can't speak from experience regarding most of the asian manufactured stuff, except for Rocky Boots. They were great when they were made in the US, in Nelsonville, Ohio, where I attended college, and could buy 2nds for a great price. I purchased them into the timeframe they moved production to China. That was the last pair I bought, the soles wore away quickly after two hunting seasons.
I did buy a pair of Silvas that are made in China, have had 4 seasons of light use on them, very comfortable, Vibram soles (have been good for tromping around after grouse in northern Wisconsin).
I like decent boots. I do like Irish Setter/ Redwings, on a personal note. Hard to enjoy a good hunt with uncomfortable feet.
A friend told me about an online source, "Zips"? or Zipps?, might be worth a look.

dagger dog
April 27, 2009, 06:28 PM
Zappos, as in zapato spanish for shoes. Don't know if they have any hunting boot though.

ArmedBear
April 27, 2009, 06:42 PM
These boots are amazing.

http://www.russellmoccasin.com/index.html

My best boots are Asolo TPS 535s. Had 'em for years, wipe and wax 'em now and then, still going strong on all kinds of trails.

Not made in China, either.

http://www.zappos.com/n/p/p/7134392.html

MCgunner
April 27, 2009, 07:16 PM
http://www.russellmoccasin.com/boots_snakeproof/snakeproof_featherweight.html

Damn, dude, 489 bucks for a snake boot? They'd better be good. Hell, I'll buy Chinese. :neener: I've had the Magellans for over a year and they're still like new. I don't wear 'em a lot, but when I do, they get some tough use, a lot of it has been under water. I could buy 7 pairs for 489 bucks!

ArmedBear
April 27, 2009, 10:39 PM
Have you ever seen them?

They're all blind-stitched. No holes through the leather. Waterproof with no Gore-Tex. The hand work is absolutely AMAZING. The leather is supple but really strong.

Granted, I haven't BOUGHT any, but if you handle the things, the price will make sense.

MCgunner
April 28, 2009, 09:09 AM
The price might make sense to Bill Gates. ROFL Sorta like the Rohrbaugh and Kahr guys telling me my Kel Tec ain't worth owning even though it never fails and has eaten 5 digits worth of trouble free ammo in 13 years and still shoots POA 3.5" groups at 25 yards. I mean, yeah, it's got a few tooling marks. :rolleyes:

I mean, I can appreciate quality craftsmanship, but my boots are quite comfortable on my feet and on my wallet. ROFL! If I win the lotto, I'll probably have more expensive tastes, I guess. Hell, I don't know, I doubt that money can take the redneck out of me. LOL I'll probably be going on 10,000 dollar Alaskan hunts wearing 70 dollar boots. :rolleyes: I know I'm "cheap". I'm also 56 years old and have been retired for 5 years, though, and even though I've lost half my IRAs in a year, I'm still getting along....for now.

Is it "cheap" or is it "thrifty". Thrifty sounds so much better. At least I don't buy my hunting boots at Walmart or Pay Less or the Dollar Store with all the welfare crowd. :D I could be worse.

ArmedBear
April 28, 2009, 10:13 AM
"Cheap" is when you wear boots that give you blisters and sore knees because they're less expensive.

"Thrifty" is when you find something comfortable that's not 500 bucks.

I'm thrifty, too, but I really appreciate that kind of quality even if I don't find the cost/benefit ratio to make sense for me.

The difference between the boots and a Ferrari, though, is that I could buy those boots without ruining myself financially. One of my legs is 3/8" longer than the other, and it messed me up for a long time. I may spring for custom boots at some point -- I'd rather pay for really, really nice boots made for me, than pay to see a doctor regularly for a problem that can be eaily solved with the proper application of a few hundred bucks.:)

MCgunner
April 28, 2009, 10:34 AM
Well, okay, thrifty. I like that much better than "cheap". :D I'm not sure I'd actually wanna wear 500 dollar boots except maybe to a dance or something. LOL! It's sorta like if I got a custom fit Purdy 12 gauge engraved, inlaid , English stocked SxS. Would I take it to the salt marsh to hunt with? Not no, but HELL no! That's what Mossbergs are for, ROFLMAO!

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
April 28, 2009, 11:32 AM
Lookit, everyone and their dog now makes GOOD comfortable boots for under $100 - with vibram soles, good ergos, quality materials including thinsulate & goretex or similar. It's kinda like pizza & tacos & sex and turnbolt rifles - you have to try very hard to get a bad one. They're all asian-made except maybe Lacrosse and even they might be now. I have positive experiences with

-Georgia Boot (great value & quality)
-Rocky
-Danner
-Irish Setter
-Lacrosse
-Wolverine

I'd just look for the features & price you want, and not worry about the brand - you'll be happy if you match the weight, insulation, sole type, etc., to your needs.

AB, should we call you Ol' Gimpy or what? :p :)

ArmedBear
April 28, 2009, 12:02 PM
I'm not sure I'd actually wanna wear 500 dollar boots except maybe to a dance or something.

Maybe that's a Texas vs. Idaho difference.

Do one's most expensive boots go on before first light, or after it gets dark?:D

MCgunner
April 28, 2009, 12:20 PM
double tap

MCgunner
April 28, 2009, 12:22 PM
LaCrosse, I have a pair of old "All Temps". I've been rather unimpressed with 'em over the years. They're worn thin on the soles, wore rather rapidly, but no fault of the boots. I was wearing 'em out in west Texas and New Mexico on the rocks and the sole is a mud type thing. They never were very waterproof above the rubber, either. They were a Christmas present from my dear wife, but she paid too much, $130 or some such. The big catch is, they have two sets of liners and a set of insoles to use without liners in warmer weather. Tell ya the truth, they ain't all that warm, supposed to handle down to -20 or some such, but +40 is more like it, at least sitting static in a stand. I use 'em with a pair of Cabelas stocking foot hip waders with 3mm neoprene bottoms, now days. They work pretty good with those waders. I can roll 'em down if not needed or up if wading.

The LaCrosse are somewhat comfortable to walk in, but my Magellan snake boots have 'em beat. I've trekked a lot of miles in those things, though, and don't have a lot of comfort complaints. I just don't think they quite meet the hype or the price. JMHO

jmr40
April 29, 2009, 12:01 AM
Spend your money how you want but cheap shoes are penney wise and pound foolish. A $250 pair of boots that last 10+ years are cheaper in the long run than a $100 pair of boots that only last 1-2 years.

M'bogo
April 29, 2009, 03:10 AM
Cabela's Elk Hunter 8" boot. Its made by Danner here in the USA. It has Gore-Tex and 400 grams of Thinsulate. It is also a great wearing and long lasting boot.

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standard-item.jsp?id=0005238810836a&navCount=1&podId=0005238810836&parentId=cat601927&masterpathid=&navAction=jump&cmCat=MainCatcat20564-cat20570-cat601927&catalogCode=QZ&rid=&parentType=index&indexId=cat601927&hasJS=true

You only have two feet, take care of them.

M'bogo

theken206
April 29, 2009, 03:12 AM
Very pleased with my irish setters by red wing

ArmedBear
April 29, 2009, 10:36 AM
Different companies tend to use different last designs.

I've liked the Danners I've tried, but they squeeze my feet. I've liked the Irish Setters, but they flop around.

It can be frustrating, finding the combination of stability, cushion, durability, and fit that work for a long day out.

Wastemore
April 29, 2009, 03:50 PM
The closet.. they love hiding in closets. :)

HoosierQ
April 29, 2009, 04:06 PM
One more for Danner. They have a very generous squared off toe box which, according to my podiatrist, is what you want. They are expensive but they can be reconditioned by Danner if the sole wears out.

moosehunt
April 30, 2009, 02:06 AM
The biggest key on boots is how they fit YOU. I haven't really seen that addressed here. Russels are great, worth every penny, but unless you hunt country that is a lot more pleasant than where I live/hunt, they are not what I call "hunting" boots. GREAT for Africa or bird hunting--maybeso the best. But, (I know, never begin a sentence with the word but) if we start talking HUNTING boots, lets get away from the cheap, economy viewpoint. Think about how much money you have tied up in a hunt--is a $250 expenditure for boots very significant? Add to that thought the fact that the high dollar boots are likely good for seveal seasons/hunts, making them more like $50 or less per hunt, counting "get in shape" time. Try something like a top end pair of Meindls and you'll never look back--never regret your investment. That indeed is what a good pair of boots is, an investment. I'm somewhat lucky in that my mode of income production causes me to spend my days doing the same type of terrain coverage as what we do when seriously hunting for elk, sheep, etc. Footwear is my lifeblood! Other than the Meindls mentioned by someone earlier, NONE of the aforementioned boots are worth the receipt that they generated. Try a pair of Meindls--yes, $250+--but you'll never regret it. I can regularly get a minimum of 6 months out of a pair of Meindls, any other boot I've tried--max 1 month, excepting Howes (spelled correctly?) which may be as good or nearly as good a boot as Meindls, but they don't happen to fit me as well. Filsons have the potential, based on the basic quality associated with the name, I've not tried them. The boots MUST fit correctly--then the investment cost becomes minor.
Good luck!

X-Rap
April 30, 2009, 10:05 AM
Quality is no doubt the key and what you say about working in your boots is the truth. I have known some wildland fire fighters and old packers and for them the best boot made is the White. I have a pair of snow packs that are Whites and they are the best winter boot I have seen.
Their top of the line is just south of $500 if I remember right but I know guys who have 2 pairs so they can send 1 pair in for repair/rebuild and they have lasted many yrs.
I have done quite a bit of mountain fence work and hunting and have always liked Redwings and then went to Filson.

theheadhunter
April 30, 2009, 11:58 AM
Best boots imo are lacrosse, great boot and the make some nice lightweight ones, i have a pair of lacrosse and columbian boots that are very nice more for water though.

moosehunt
April 30, 2009, 12:52 PM
Yes indeed, Whites are excellent boots. I have a pair that I have used extensivly and continue to use, but for serious hunting/hiking, I much prefer the Meindls. I still use the Whites (they are past due for a rebuild), but not when serious walking is on the agenda, especially if it is steep and/or rocky, though I used to before I found Meindls. Plus, being pre-gortex, they don't shed water very good even though well greased. But the Whites are great boots; I just feel that the Meindls are better for hunting.

MCgunner
April 30, 2009, 05:00 PM
Blah, most of the time, I'm wearin' my Crocs....:neener:

Great boat shoes, too. :D

moosehunt
April 30, 2009, 05:21 PM
Haven't heard of that boot. Though I'm obviously high on Meindls, I also am always on the lookout for better. Where do you get these? Price range?

MCgunner
April 30, 2009, 06:17 PM
Crocs? BWAAAAA, ha, ha!

How about the "trailbreak"

http://shop.crocs.com/images/product/medium/1688_1_khaki.jpg

Or the "Yukon"?

http://shop.crocs.com/images/product/medium/929_1_charcoalmedgr.jpg

Yep, the "Yukon", just what you need in the wilds of the Yukon. ROFLMAO!

Actually, they're quite comfy for every day and make fantastic boat shoes. If they come off, they float! I even work in 'em, but they're not hunting boots.

Actually, I got mine, Yukon style, at Walmart for 6 bucks. But, if you have to have the originals, they even have 'em in camo, they're $29.95 at Academy. A little much for an injection molded "shoe". I prefer the Walmart version. Hell, last pair lasted over a year before I got these camo ones I have now. Well, it's sorta camo. They just mixed various shades of green plastic in the injection molder. Probably costs 'em 10 cents to actually manufacture a pair.

http://www.crocs.com/products/men/

ArmedBear
April 30, 2009, 06:49 PM
I wore those last Winter. Never again.:D

MCgunner
April 30, 2009, 08:36 PM
What's the problem? I wear 'em all winter down here. :D Of course, I wear T shirts all year and rarely put a coat on. It can get cold, in the 40s, for a couple of days after a front, though, well, at night for a low. We usually have one or two light freezes.

moosehunt
April 30, 2009, 10:15 PM
Hah! You got me on that one, Mr. MCgunner. I thought we were talking boots--Croc, as in croc of BS! Good one! I may be wrong, but I don't think that they have those sandals here in Nevada--least I've never seen 'em.

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