Wizzard


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Fran Bavun
May 1, 2009, 09:10 PM
I have a US Revolver, 32 cal. It has 98% crome , working condition. Shot it last weekend. Could anybody tell me what it is worth?

harry9252@verizon.net

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kingpin008
May 1, 2009, 09:25 PM
We're really going to need more info, and pics will most certainly help.

When you say US, do you mean in origin, or is that a manufacturer? What condition is it in? Is the chrome worn at all, and if so, where and to what degree? Is they cylinder tight (both end-wise and side-to-side)?

rcmodel
May 2, 2009, 01:19 PM
Wait! I have to use some Windex on my crystal ball.
AH! I can see clearly now!

With no more info on the gun then you gave us, I will guess it really is marked
U.S. Revolver.
If so:

U.S. Revolver: Trade name used by the Iver Johnson Arms and Cycle Works on inexpensive pocket revolvers.

It was a cheap gun when it was made 100 years ago, and it is still a cheap gun now.

What used to be called a Saturday Night Special.

They sell on gun auction sites for $50 - $100 all the time.

rc

Cannonball888
May 2, 2009, 03:57 PM
rcmodel, you da wizzard!

armoredman
May 2, 2009, 04:24 PM
Brother had one years ago, worked quite well, actually. Broke a spring, and last time I saw it, was being kept in reserve for the next gun-buyup from local gov't...and they never had one.
Conversation piece, I would consider moving up just a bit.

Ron James
May 2, 2009, 07:31 PM
There are two frames sizes on the US Revolver { AKA Iver Johnson } The double action , solid frame is a small frame 100 % 125 $, 60% 75 $.
Both automatics are top break and large frame, one has a hammer and does not have the safety hammer. The other is hammer-less and has the safty hammer, Both 100% 225%, 60% 105$. Made between 1910/11 and 1935 { info from Bill Goforth. www.geocties.com/iverjohnsoncollectors

Jim K
May 4, 2009, 01:21 PM
There is actually a bit of a story there. When Iver Johnson went to their new transfer bar safety device, c. 1894, they decided to use up leftover parts from their old model to make a second quality gun. To keep the IJ name associated with the new revolver, they formed a new company, the U.S. Revolver Co., to market the old-style guns. The line proved popular enough that they not only used up the old parts, but made new guns under the U.S. name.

The U.S. brand was sold almost exclusively through mail order companies.

FWIW, the terms "automatic" and "automatic revolver" applied to guns of that era meant the automatic ejection of empty cases when the gun was opened, as opposed to the manual ejection required of many single action and solid frame revolvers. (S&W designated its swing-cylinder revolvers "hand ejectors" to distinguish them from their line of top break revolvers.)

Jim

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