survival packs


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blackbearaddict
May 8, 2009, 08:07 PM
first of all, i need some advice on what to put in a small survival pack

also, im trying to figure out to wrap up my parachute cord so in doesnt come off the end

thanks, addict

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bigfatdave
May 8, 2009, 08:38 PM
Wrap the end in electrical tape, and then wrap the desired cut point in tape BEFORE cutting in the future.

As to what to put in a survival pack, good luck, like any firearm, it is an exercise in compromises. I would say you need (as a start)

Defensive sidearm (plus ammo/holster/very basic maintenance stuff)
Some basic tools (SAK & locking pliers would be a good start)
Change of clothes (triple socks)
Mobile phone (prepaid)
Cord
A dozen real carabiners
Tarp and/or tent (matters on climate)
Matches and lighter (maybe a firesteel?)
Fuel/tinder for starting fire on the first try
Utility gloves
First Aid kit (commercial plus your own picks)
Food (long-lasting commercial)
Water (refillable bottles plus a collapsible container/cubetainer)
Water filter/purification (both, they aren't heavy)
Some large bandannas (very versatile!)
Flashlight, batteries, and backup light/batteries
Cash
Bag to carry everything
Bag to carry anything else inside the main bag


That would be a good start, not duplicate that bag for every family member, and keep one in every vehicle/dwelling/workplace and you should be good to go.

Jmurman
May 8, 2009, 08:39 PM
paracord can be tied up with a flame.

small survival packs can be for overnight, 72 hours etc. You need to define what you're looking for and then start figuring out what you'll need to get through that time period.

Ed Ames
May 8, 2009, 08:44 PM
I think the H&R/NEF 20ga is great for survival packs. You can break it down into a fairly compact package which could in fact be held together with paracord.

Many prefer pistols. My main thought is to minimize the resource lock-up. $120 in your survival pack is better than $400.

RatDrall
May 8, 2009, 08:52 PM
In my 72 hr bag (Maxpedition Versapack) I have the following:

*Contents revised last night, after further consideration, and reposted below along with pics*

I also have a water bottle with a carry strap with the pack, but not in it. I had a bigger pack with more stuff in it (spare clothes, more food, more water etc.) but simplified everything after I actually tried hiking with the load. My current pack is small, comfortable, and only weighs a couple of pounds. It has everything I need to make it a few days (or hike home from work if I have to) without weighing me down. With the Versapack on one hip and the water on the other, it balances nicely without slowing me down at all.

Whatever you decide to pack, be sure to test it with an actual hike. The best way to learn is to go camping, with friends, and try to survive with only what you have on you. That way, if things go poorly, you can mooch off of them and not ruin your weekend.

Phydeaux642
May 8, 2009, 08:55 PM
I picked a book by Cody Lundin called "98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive!" which seems to have some good ideas about a survival kit. It doesn't include a firearm, but the rest of it makes a lot of sense. I would add a small handgun with ammo and call it good.

Ed Ames
May 8, 2009, 09:04 PM
What's the deal with all the non-firearm stuff in these lists?

I would add to the 20ga a box of birdshot and 5 or so slugs.

A pistol should have over 30rds of ammo, preferably in rattle-free magazines or speed loaders.

A revolver makes a lot of sense but 'accurate' is the watchword.

duckman007
May 8, 2009, 09:05 PM
If you Google "bug out bag" you will get a ton of information, including information on several pre-assembled kits. While this may not be exactly what you are looking for, it may give you a idea of some of the things people recommend for survival, camping, or SHTF situations. Some even come with compartments for ammo and a handgun. As far as a firearm is concerned, I have a AR-7 that's compact and makes a good small game hunting weapon. It was basically designed just for this purpose.

Some additional information:

Here is a link on sterilizing water using PET bottles, if you're interested.

http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/004261.html

There has been some concern over the PET bottles leaching chemicals, but from what I've read, it appears that the dangers are very minimal or even non-existent based on some reports. I recommend researching it yourself if you're concerned.

Also, here's another link on making a refrigerator out of clay pots.

http://www.roadjunky.com/article/1672/the-clay-pot-fridge-is-a-boon-for-the-third-world-and-travelers-in-the-sticks

Again, this may not be exactly what you're asking for information on, but maybe you or someone else can make use of it hopefully.

Phydeaux642
May 8, 2009, 09:09 PM
What's the deal with all the non-firearm stuff in these lists?


Because he asked about survival packs. Surely, THR hasn't become so narrowly focused that firearms, and only firearms, can be mentioned answering a question about survival packs.

Ed Ames
May 8, 2009, 09:16 PM
Just seems like asking that on a gun/RKBA forum would imply a gun/RKBA answer expectation. You can get non-gun survival pack info from 1000 more credible sources.

RatDrall
May 8, 2009, 09:43 PM
Survival doesn't usually involve fighting hordes of ninja zombie bears.

I'd bet that water, shelter and fire would be more important than a 7 lb rifle with 10 lbs of ammunition in a non-fantasy survival situation.

A lot of gunnies are in horrible shape and have trouble walking to the 100 yard mark at the range, much less hike into the woods carrying a battle rifle and huge pack full of gear that they think they need. Heaps of expensive gear looks cool but a lot of things aren't likely to be needed and will only weigh a guy down.

I'm more worried about ripping my pants and having to hike home in a loin cloth, or something like that, than I am about getting into gun fights. Although, I bet I could whip up a cool thong with some 550 cord and a bandana....

Avenger29
May 8, 2009, 09:54 PM
Although, I bet I could whip up a cool thong with some 550 cord and a bandana....

Whoa, dude, TMI TMI!!!

Ed Ames
May 8, 2009, 10:00 PM
Exactly my point..."gunnies" are not as a rule survival experts and the unifying interest isn't survival but a particular tool which can be used for survival about the way a hammer can be used to plant corn.

Since the original poster knows all of that and included that knowledge in their decision to post here, it seems reasonable to assume they wanted info on the tools we are most likely to be familiar with: guns.

I think a .32 H&R magnum or .327 mag would be ideal as a survival pack (kit) gun if you were looking at a revolver, provided you could count on decent (1" at 15 yards worst case, 1" at 25 yards would be better) accuracy.

It's a real shame nobody makes an equivalent of the H&R handi guns in pistol form. Cheap, accurate, light, small single shots would be really nice to stash in your survival pack. Unfortunately the anti "saturday night special" BS probably means manufacturers don't want to touch that market.

blackbearaddict
May 8, 2009, 10:32 PM
thanks for all the help
im goin to be just using a tiny little pack about 7x4x1 inches for emergencies
and of course i just have to have my .357 with me :D

jbkebert
May 8, 2009, 11:34 PM
http://www.outdoorsafe.com/kits.htm

I went to a siminar last weekend put on buy this guy. I thought I knew a fair amount about survival. This dude was a airforce sere instructor, ran the air-force survival academy in colorado, Artic survival school in Alaska, and jungle survival school in the Phillipines. Most interesting 8 hour class I have ever attended.

Oyeboten
May 8, 2009, 11:57 PM
Hi-Standard Model 'B' 4 inch, two extra Magazines ( charged ), two 100 ct Boxes of St'd Velocity Cartridges...

Sharp, long 'Coltsfoot' Handle Hatchet

One Carton of Lucky Strikes, one of Pall Malls.

One Box 'Strike Anywhere' Kitchen Matches ( in Zip Lock Bags ) and four small 'Bic' Lighters.

College Ruled, Sprial Bound Notebook, Pens and Pencils.

Binoculars


Bunch of in-a-pouch thin Milar Poncho-Blanket things...ahandfull of chemical 'Hand Warmers'...couple rolls of 'Charmin'...

100 feet of stout small diameter Cord

Small Kit of medical suppies - basic Bandages, tournequette, antiseptics, Sulfas, Peroxide, Salt, Suture packs, Clamps/Haemostats, Tweezers, Magnifying Glass...pakages of dry Electrolytes.

Sauce Pan, 'Tin' Cups...clean Socks...Sunglasses...Cello-Pack Forks and Spoons...

Spam, canned Sardines, canned Beans, canned Tomatoes, canned ground Coffee, canned Milk...Box of Soda Crackers.

WWII GI Knife and Sheath...

Flashlight...


About like a smaller-medium 'Carry On' Luggage...

Tamlin
May 9, 2009, 12:08 AM
RatDrall,

Survival doesn't mean fighting zombie hordes, but it would be nice to get some rabbits or squirrels for dinner. Don't need the 7 lb deer rifle, but certainly a good old Glenfield Model 60 .22 rifle is in order. At the least I would include a .357 pistol - use the .38's for rabbit hunting; the .357's for protection.

crazy-mp
May 9, 2009, 12:14 AM
Gerber or Leatherman, depending on your preference. I carry one to work and use it several times a day, now I would be lost without it.

A small pack of baby wipes would also be handy, sounds strange, but being able to wipe the crud off your face and neck when/if you stop for a break is priceless, if your worried about the scent, they also make scent free ones.

Extra boot or shoe laces, ever broke one? Or you can use them as a lanyard for your pistol, or lashing some sticks together to carry etc..

colomtn
May 9, 2009, 12:20 AM
For some good information on survival and recovery here is a good site to check out.

http://www.theplacewithnoname.com/blogs/klessons/

janobles14
May 9, 2009, 12:27 AM
i used this link to make mine and it worked great! well....it would work great i hope!

http://www.fieldandstream.com/photos/gallery/survival/food/2006/08/make-survival-kit-out-altoids-tin-and-two-more-life-saving-diy-

545days
May 9, 2009, 12:49 AM
One forty-five caliber automatic
Two boxes of ammunition
Four days' concentrated emergency rations
One drug issue containing antibiotics, morphine, vitamin pills, pep pills, sleeping pills, tranquilizer pills
One miniature combination Russian phrase book and Bible
One hundred dollars in rubles
One hundred dollars in gold
Nine packs of chewing gum
One issue of prophylactics
Three lipsticks
Three pair of nylon stockings

If it was good enough for Slim Pickins, it is good enough for me.

Edit: A Link for those of you too young to understand my reference to Slim Pickins. He is the speaker in this Youtube clip from the 1964 movie "Dr Strangelove." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5qqfsQGYus

bad_aim_billy
May 9, 2009, 12:53 AM
+1 on the Field and Stream altoids tin kit, I made one and carry it when hiking, out here a snowstorm can happen at any time...

Oyeboten
May 9, 2009, 01:06 AM
Hi 545days,


You'd mentioned -


One forty-five caliber automatic
Two boxes of ammunition
Four days' concentrated emergency rations
One drug issue containing antibiotics, morphine, vitamin pills, pep pills, sleeping pills, tranquilizer pills
One miniature combination Russian phrase book and Bible
One hundred dollars in rubles
One hundred dollars in gold
Nine packs of chewing gum
One issue of prophylactics
Three lipsticks
Three pair of nylon stockings

If it was good enough for Slim Pickins, it is good enough for me.



Well...I'm definitely revising and up-dating my Kit..!



"Heeeeeeeeeeeeee-Hawwwwwww!"

KC0QGL
May 9, 2009, 01:07 AM
545days you beat me to it.

RatDrall
May 9, 2009, 09:15 AM
RatDrall,

Survival doesn't mean fighting zombie hordes, but it would be nice to get some rabbits or squirrels for dinner. Don't need the 7 lb deer rifle, but certainly a good old Glenfield Model 60 .22 rifle is in order. At the least I would include a .357 pistol - use the .38's for rabbit hunting; the .357's for protection.

My "zombie ninja bear" comment wasn't aimed at anyone in this thread, just most threads in general on gun boards with the word "survival" in them.

A 72 hour bag isn't for TEOTWAWKI where you have to live forever off of what you have. You can go 72 hours with very little food. I see my bag being used only if something happened and I had to walk home from work or camp out somehwere for a night because I'm stranded.

I assume that anyone on this forum probably carries a sidearm and a reload. I didn't mention the Sig or the spare magazine, or the sheath knife and 'hawk, because I don't keep them in my 72 hour bag and they're only on the list because I am used to using them outdoors, and aren't universally required survival items.

I did add a 25 round box of ammunition and a 3 pack of camp candles to my bag(I triple bagged the candles to see if they'll melt in my car this summer).

Here is all the stuff inside of my Versapack (minus the 'hawk and water bottle) after further consideration last night:

http://i588.photobucket.com/albums/ss323/RatDrall/Survival72HourBagContents.jpg

From the lower left, going right:

First Row
- 20' nylon strapping with a dozen safety pins
- 2 patches with a few needles and lots of thread
- Pocket knife sharpener
- Compass
- First aid kit
Second Row
- 3 camp candles
- Streamlight Twintask light and spare batteries
- Pocket rain poncho
- 2x 50' 550 cord
- Bandana
- Rat Cutlery Izula (I can't recommend this knife more as a tiny knife that can do big things outdoors)
Third Row
- Strike anywhere matches in waterproof case
- 2x emergency blankets
- 25 rounds of ammo
- Spare magazine
Crap that doesn't go in the bag
- Rat Cutlery RC-3
- CS Trail Hawk
- 27 oz canteen with shoulder strap

I need to buy a new firesteel, I have no idea where my old one went. I also seem to be missing my water purification tablets and I must have eaten my power bars. At least I still have some room in there.

heron
May 9, 2009, 12:06 PM
The two most essential:
* knife
* fire

If you plan to be needing this for more than a day, I strongly suggest a good hatchet -- one with the hammer face on the back of the head. A hammer is the kind of thing that has no substitute, and if you don't believe me, just try making a serviceable hammer when you don't already have one. Bashing things with rocks tends to bruise your hands (very bad for survival) about as much as it does useful work.

Consider making a drop-leg sheath for your hatchet, mounted with the head down. Ready to hand, saves space (and weight) in the pack.

I saw a survival book once, where the author had a .22 rifle included, and he made a sling out of paracord. (I don't recall the book, sorry.) Nice way to store some extra cord, but only if you consider the sling expendable.

RatDrall
May 9, 2009, 12:32 PM
If you plan to be needing this for more than a day, I strongly suggest a good hatchet -- one with the hammer face on the back of the head. A hammer is the kind of thing that has no substitute, and if you don't believe me, just try making a serviceable hammer when you don't already have one.

Like this Cold Steel Trail Hawk?

http://i588.photobucket.com/albums/ss323/RatDrall/Survival72HourBag.jpg

Suicide*Ride
May 9, 2009, 02:22 PM
27 posts & no one said anything about a handheld HF ham/cb radio (mine has 6 bands & both upper & lower ch.-480 total), a wind-up led flashlight, or a BIG magnifying glass (for daytime fire starting).

I actually got a contact pyrometer & measured how hot the focal point of a 5-1/2' magnifiying glass was. 2034 deg.f.!! No BS! I got the glass from an old hobbiest light/magnifier, the kind my X-wife would use to cross-stich with. I don't remember what you call them. (hobbiest/workshop light w/ magnifier?)

Anyway, the "hot-spot" measured about 2 in. (size of a golfball) & will burn a hole in a piece of paper almost instantly!! Try it!!

I also have some Peach tea (w/o sugar) in case someone w/ me is Diabetic. 6 packets @ 1/2gal ea. = 3gal. It tastes better than plain water & will hide any foul "treated" water tastes. Plus, the container for the tea packets can double as a drinking glass. You can find it next to the Crystal-lite powder mixes @ the store.

And what about a signal mirror or a couple of US Coast Guard 12ga. marine signal flares? (for those of you that might carry a shottie or flare gun)

Just a couple of things I carry in my bag that I didn't see anyone post. :)

Cannonball888
May 9, 2009, 06:59 PM
I only pack a chewing gum wrapper for survival. I call it the McGyver Lite Kit.

Leanwolf
May 9, 2009, 08:19 PM
Where's the toilet paper???

L.W.

bigfatdave
May 9, 2009, 09:15 PM
Where's the toilet paper??
I told you those bandannas were versatile!

I'm liking the inclusion of baby wipes, get a bunch of the travel-size packs so one rupturing won't mess up much gear, and also won't leave you with only dry baby wipes.

Extra boot or shoe laces is also a great idea, and if your daily footwear isn't sturdy, I'd include a set of boots in your size and broken in (use old work-boots?).

If you were seriously setting up a B.O.B., a .22 pistol might be in order, or a break-down .22 rifle. It is easier to carry spare ammunition, and shooting a bunny for dinner with a defensive centerfire round may result in a spectacular hit ... and not much to eat.

heron
May 9, 2009, 09:36 PM
Like this Cold Steel Trail Hawk?Nice. Mine's an Estwing; maybe a bit heavier, but prettier (if you need looks) -- and the handle can't break.

Readyrod
May 14, 2009, 10:23 PM
I live in Tokyo. My biggest worry is the next big earthquake. They hit this place about every 70 yrs and the last one was in 1923. We haven't had any of the usual small earthquakes recently and that makes me nervous.(I just upgraded my home emergency bag, that Katrina guy has really good suggestions) I worry about getting back home from work to the family. I have a mini compass, an Ark AAA premium, a small SAK, and a small whistle on my keychain,(bulky but manageable) about $200 emergency cash in my wallet, and a jacket, poncho, led flasher, and small leatherman in my bag. The gameplan is to head north to the Arakawa river, about 15km, get across the river somehow, and head East about 10km to the evacuation point where I will meet my family.

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