bow over at ''The Possibles Shop''


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BHP FAN
May 12, 2009, 02:58 PM
I usually look for cap and ball flash cups,nipples and powder horns at this site but I noticed a ''archery'' section,and clicked on ''wooden bows''...and found this:


Plains Indian Bow
This powerful bow is made from solid Red Oak backed with linen and pulls about 45 pounds at 20 inches. It is similar to the bows used by Plains Indians for warfare and hunting buffalo. The bow is only 56 inches long and is easy to maneuver from the back of a horse or wooded areas. Both arrows and bow handle are gripped together and with practice the bow can be loaded and shot in 5 seconds. This is an extremely powerful weapon accurate up to 10 yards or so. It includes three arrows which are lashed to the back of the bow but can be quickly removed and loaded as the situation requires. This is NOT A TOY. The bow is permanently finished and needs no maintenance. Instructions are included with the bow.
Key Benefits:
Great bow for Survival, Hunting, or Reenactment
Strong bow (50 pound draw) in a compact length (only 48 inches long)
Full One Year Warranty from date of purchase
A great handmade bow for a great price

Description Order No. Price Order Now
Plains Indian Bow
With 3 Arrows 91-3010
$105.00

is this a good price?I haven't played around much with bows since I discovered firearms at about age fourteen,but I am fairly strong.Is fifty pounds too much pull for a non-compound bow?

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James T Thomas
May 12, 2009, 03:19 PM
That bow is similar in description to the ones at Rudderbowarchery; sorry I don't know the address precisely.

With the one year warranty; I would say it is quality.

However, as a survival bow, the fiberglass "Traditional" bow has a much longer uselfull life. Even with finished wood, that is, sealed, etc.,the wood will warp or dry rot some. This can be slowed, but not prevented by regular maintenance and correct care. -Storage.

That 50 pound force draw weight will decrease with time, but even so, would be adequate to take game or defend yourself. You will have to adjust your shooting as it occurs.
I've had some powerfull "pow wows" here on THR about the "stopping power" of an arrow embedded in your chest versus a hand gun bullet, and I still
"feel" that I would rather be shot with a gun!
That shaft and barbed metal blades would ruin you whole weekend. And if you bump the protruding feather end while you are thrashing about, you will have a "stimulus."

There is one other site that produces the backed, wooden bows that I'm aware of.
If you are still contemplating; post here and I will find and add it for you.

BHP FAN
May 12, 2009, 04:15 PM
I'm still contemplating,and in fact,after reading your advice,darn near have myself talked into it. How long do you think the effective lifespan of the bow I'm looking at is? I'm fifty,so if it lasts twenty years,that would be plenty.Any more than that , and I'll be passing it along to my son,anyways.

Nightrunner
May 12, 2009, 07:29 PM
For a sturdy, well-crafted handmade wooden bow, $105 is a great price. I'm sure if you weren't interested in the authenticity of a real wooden bow you would just stick to the synthetic. A 50lb draw is not too awful much. If you practice with it, you'll get a feel for it.

James T Thomas
May 12, 2009, 07:37 PM
I'm sorry "BHP," but I cannot state any expected life span.

I just do not have experience with them, but hopefully, many here on THR do.

And there are sites for the "Traditional Archer" that certainly can quote what to expect.

I did have self bows of Osage Orange wood my grandfather made; they were of the rounded or D shape, and lasted into my lifetime. That would have been a span of thirty years. My mother had a yew bow of that shape too, and it had lasted perhaps fifteen years until my friend mistakenly strung it backward.

Those wood bows do have an attraction that the new fangled contraptions just don't have.

Or I suppose some of my own viewpoint colors my perception.
I have a wooden canoe in my garage that I admire greatly.
But then, I am not ageing gracefully, as you can tell.

mole
May 12, 2009, 08:17 PM
The lifespan will vary on many conditions such as storage, maintance, way of bracing, and tiller among other things. Remember, if it is made to be drawn only 20 inches then all it takes is an overly enthusastic person to overdraw and ruin it.

Red oak isn't the most durable bow wood, but it makes good bows and I use it a lot.

The decriptions and prices of the other bows seem to be the same as those from Philip Silva's website http://www.woodbows.com/products.html , so they might be a dealer of his bows (the one you mention isn't listed on Silva's website but may still be made by his family and it wouldn't hurt to inquire). I've never seen one of his products, however, I hear that his linen backed red oak bows are well made and work well.

Hope that helps,
mole

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
May 12, 2009, 08:31 PM
For a sturdy, well-crafted handmade wooden bow, $105 is a great price.

That's what I'm thinking - I paid over twice that for a handmade slippery elm longbow which is only 25 lbs @ 28", and no arrows.

Ditto; I'm interested if you're not.

Drawback to that bow is that it's designed for quick snapshots with its short draw length, so holding and aiming well is going to be difficult at that shortened draw length. Good for horseback or defense; not so great for hunting.

vicdotcom
May 12, 2009, 08:52 PM
I would have to say that for $105 for a handcrafted (correctly) wood bow sounds a little Too Good To Be True.

It might be enough to have fun with and to even hunt with from time to time. But it would be skeptical that it would last 20 years or so.

But if you only plan on shooting once a month or less, it might be a good starter bow. If you are looking into getting into primitive bow shooting, I would recommend getting something better and better fit for you.

PT1911
May 12, 2009, 09:04 PM
how is it both 56 and 48 inches long? magic bow..

BHP FAN
May 12, 2009, 10:15 PM
Well,I'm going to call them tommorow.Dr Tad,I'm sure they have more than one.We should both get 'em.I probably will if I have any money left after the gunshow this weekend...

BHP FAN
May 12, 2009, 10:18 PM
''But if you only plan on shooting once a month or less, it might be a good starter bow. If you are looking into getting into primitive bow shooting, I would recommend getting something better and better fit for you...''
vicdot com,a starter bow to take to the occasional Rendezvous is what I'm after,so this should do just fine.If I end up with it,I'll give a range report...

Searcher1970
May 12, 2009, 11:09 PM
Generally shorter bows are harder to shoot plus they dont hold up as well as longer bows. I've been shooting primitive bows for about 20 years now. I shoot primarily short bows, 52 inches and under, but I have a pretty short draw length. Shorter bows also seem harder to draw do to stacking. Depending on your draw length I'd recommend a 60+ inch bow.

BHP FAN
May 12, 2009, 11:23 PM
Well,I live near pretty dense brushy woods is why I was leaning toward the short bow,plus I collect black powder and Indian stuff in general,so this seemed like a natural...mostly this one will live hung below my Trapdoor Carbine,and my genuine Sioux tomahawk.

Searcher1970
May 12, 2009, 11:34 PM
Areas like that are where short bows really shine.

BHP FAN
May 12, 2009, 11:47 PM
I'm hopeing I have some money left after the gunshow.

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