Not again.......! Feral Hog Control in East Texas


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Ballistic Mule
August 3, 2010, 02:24 AM
Well done. Looks like a sweet rig there. Do you hunt'em every night Flint?

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pikid89
August 3, 2010, 02:34 AM
killed a 190lb Bar Hog in swfl with a Glock 19 to the head this evening

FLAvalanche
August 3, 2010, 11:06 AM
Nice shootin Flint.

Lightninstrike
August 3, 2010, 07:52 PM
Damn. Now I want a .458 SOCOM upper for my AR platform......

Flintknapper
August 3, 2010, 09:27 PM
Before building the SOCOM....I was mainly using a 7mm-08. It did fine...but I always felt concerned when less than ideal shot angles (steep raking shots) were presented. Normally, I'd just wait for a better shot.

The SOCOM puts 'em down hard, RIGHT THERE, RIGHT NOW, ONE SHOT!

I haven't yet had any weird angles to shoot from with this rifle....but I am confident that with a proper bullet (Barnes TTSX, Banded Solid, etc), I could shoot them from ANY angle (coming to me, going away, hard quartering) and still reach the vitals.

Another bonus, even with some of my hotter loads....recoil is very manageable.

FLAvalanche
August 4, 2010, 09:51 AM
Went up and checked my camera and they were all turned off...Interesting.

Flintknapper
August 6, 2010, 10:41 AM
Another example of coons and hogs feeding and interacting. We talked about this recently.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Boar852010a.jpg

As previously stated...I most often see this associated with a lone boar.

I truly believe boars (and other hogs)...will utilize "coon trails" as a tool to locate food and water when they first enter unfamiliar territory. (But don't depend on them...of course)

They seem to know that coons will be the first to find water and food in any given area.

I've seen this much too often for it to be mere coincidence (but I could be wrong :rolleyes:)


Flint.

336A
August 6, 2010, 10:50 AM
Pardon me if this question has already been asked but I don't have the time to read through all 21 pages. Due to my job I'll be going to Georgia next year and plan on getting in some hog hunting. My question is this. I have a Marlin 1894SS in .44 mag that I would like to use. I load it with handloads which consist of a Speer 240gr JSP over 24gr of H110 for about 1750fps. Will this combo be effective on wild pigs?

308win
August 6, 2010, 10:57 AM
Went up and checked my camera and they were all turned off...Interesting.

Pigs are getting smarter:D

longdayjake
August 6, 2010, 11:45 AM
Went up and checked my camera and they were all turned off...Interesting.

Sounds like a vegan has been hiking there. Just curious but what pictures did it get before it was turned off? My dad has pictures of a guy that turned his deer cameras off. All I know is he had better not ever run into someone with long hair and tie dye bandana while he is out setting up cameras or there will be trouble.

Sky
August 6, 2010, 01:54 PM
My gun range guy has pigs that act like dogs. They seem to be smart enough to stay away from targets and really active ranges. Anyway Larry the gun range owner has no boars. He waits until the the females go into heat and sits on his front porch and pops the Boars as they try to mount the sows...He has more pork and sausage than a regular meat packing plant. You might try a cheap bow set up and really have some fun..would get a 40 or 45 pound re-curve and some arrows all for less than $200 bucks and you can pretty much shoot anytime anywhere. The shorter the bow the more finger pinch so prolly anything less than 60" might not work for you. The pigs in the pictures were small but I highly recommend do not expect them to just lay down and die when shot; protect yourself in case one gets pissed and comes after you. Many years ago I gave up my guns cause in my demented way I thought they were unfair (point and shoot they die etc etc) and got into archery. A normal guy can get plenty good with a bow out to fifty yrds in a short time. Longer shots up to 100yrds are certainly not impossible. You can go spend big bucks on the compound super pulley 12 cam mo-moes and you can reach out and touch a pig with an arrow traveling over 300ft + per second. Sounds kinda wimpy when an AR is going 3250ft per but more than adequate for Oinkers.

FLAvalanche
August 6, 2010, 02:26 PM
Sounds like a vegan has been hiking there. Just curious but what pictures did it get before it was turned off? My dad has pictures of a guy that turned his deer cameras off. All I know is he had better not ever run into someone with long hair and tie dye bandana while he is out setting up cameras or there will be trouble.
There weren't any pictures on the cameras at all. They are the cheap WalMart Bushnell Trail Scouts and are absolute garbage and have turned themselves off before.

But all three in one night? I don't think so. Once is an occurance, twice is a coincidence, three times is a problem.

I have gotten pictures of people carrying what appeared to be tubing through the field at 4 am and one of the neighbors stopped me to see who I was because he's convinced people are growing drugs further on it because he's had people walking through his property in the middle of the night carrying stuff also.

Flintknapper
August 6, 2010, 03:40 PM
O.K. guys.....lets keep it hog related and not turn this into a "chat room" for every game-camera/other story you can come up with.

You can start a new thread for that.

Thanks,

Flint.

Ike R
August 6, 2010, 03:51 PM
This is One of the most interesting and infomative hog threads on the entire internet.

For those interested in Hog Hunts near Houston,Texas there is a former farmer here in Winnie that does them at the price of $50 an evening, it was Bowhunt only but have heard rumors that he has gone to guns. He does not promise a kill, however before I fell into my hunting area I made a kill 90% of the time with my bow. Largest boar I have seen off the place was near the 550 mark, they are corn fed and clean to eat. he gave up farming because he couldn't get rid of them fast enough and began raising deer, bison, and released russian strain boars (at least thats the rumor) to make the hogs more marketable.
PM Me if you want any more information.

I now hunt over 3000 acres belonging to a local ricefarmer, of which 1000 of them are not available to hunt from september to feb as those are the main hunting season's around here and that land is leased to other hunters dureing that time. That fact there makes it hard to control the hogs on said property, we can however trap them still. We exterminate nutria rats, coons (on the land with crawfish farms), coyotes, and, my favorite, hogs.

We spotlight at night with a tika 7mm 08 and me on my AR in 5.56, we don't use night vision, infrared ect ect, just 2 spotlights and 2 guns. I shoot the smaller hogs, useing the neck shot Flint uses while my hunting partner drops the larger ones, our record for one night is 25 hogs from 60 to 300 pounds. Largest hog we have shot was an out of the blue sow that walked up on our coyote setup she was in the 600 range, i took her with a triple tap to the chest area useing 2 55 grain ball ammo and one 63 grain tracer round. She was running at me and she was very upset lol, most likely the closest call I will ever have while hunting here in the States.

Best time we have found to catch them at night is on a full or near full moon, dureing the day we search for shallow water sources in deep cover. If its been a hot afternoon and a sudden Texas T Storm rolls in, we roll out as that will make them move early and often they can be caught in wide open ground. At one point and time we could drive a Mule within 15 feet of them and slaughter indescriminatly if it was raining and thundering, now however thats impossible.

A local rice farmer rented a chopper out of Beaumont a few months ago (600 dollars for 4 hours) and killed 78 before he ran out of ammo, his weapon of choice was a Saiga 12 gauge shooting slugs, had a high capacity drum mag on it. Largest 2 hogs he shot where 2 sows that weighed in at 737 and 786. As he made kills he dropped Helium filled aluminum ballons with weights tied on the bottem of them so that his workers could come drag them out of the ricefield. These particular sounders, aprox 5 of them, where destroying up to 10 acres of crop a NIGHT!, most of it merely from them moveing from one point to another. Another farmer here in Town hunts them out of a para sail useing a saiga, their record is 25 in 4 hours. These two farmers are STILL haveing hog trouble,

Me and my partner give our meat to anyone who is needy and asks, failing that the local state trapper takes it and uses it for cyanide traps for coyotes, other hunters may want to consider doing the same as the state does not pay for the trappers bait, game wardens may have a use for it too as on more than one occasion I have been asked by them if we had any fresh kills in the field.

Flintknapper
August 6, 2010, 04:07 PM
Sky wrote:

You might try a cheap bow set up and really have some fun..would get a 40 or 45 pound re-curve and some arrows all for less than $200 bucks and you can pretty much shoot anytime anywhere. The shorter the bow the more finger pinch so prolly anything less than 60" might not work for you.

You mean something like this: ;)
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/longbows1.jpg
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Three custom made Acadian Woods longbows and one “Tree-Stick”.

I make my own strings, arrows and flint arrowheads to hunt with.
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/pileofrocks1.jpg
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/arrow_2.jpg
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/arrow_1.jpg

I have been a traditional bow-hunter for 40 yrs now. I have many more kills with a bow than with my rifles.

Archery has always been my first love…..but it is not the most efficient way to control Feral Hogs, so when “push comes to shove” concerning hogs, out come the firearms….now than I’m getting older. :(

FLAvalanche
August 6, 2010, 10:29 PM
How do those hand made serrated edge broadheads penetrate? I've had problems with serrated edge broadheads penetrating. They seem to get slowed down heavily by the thick skin and fat of hogs.

My bow is shooting near 300 fps and three blade G5 Montecs or 2/4 blade Magnus Stingers penetrate well. I have an older 150 grain 3 blade serrated broadhead and I've tried Magnus Stinger Buzzcuts and neither one penetrate hogs to my liking.

Flintknapper
August 7, 2010, 02:00 AM
FLAvalanche wrote:

How do those hand made serrated edge broadheads penetrate?
Very well. In fact... I have tested them against some of my steel broadheads (Zwickey Deltas and Black Diamonds) and they consistently out penetrate them in both foam targets and in the field on game.

The reason is simple, "properly" made points are thinner at tip than at the base and the cross section is lenticular. In layman's terms: You have a very sharp "wedge" that "parts" the hide and tissue.



I've had problems with serrated edge broadheads penetrating. They seem to get slowed down heavily by the thick skin and fat of hogs.
A serrated edge will tend to "snag" on certain things (long hair, tendons, sinew) especially if those items are perpendicular to the cutting edge upon impact.

If you're shooting a heavy enough arrow....it really shouldn't present a problem for you. Also, some folks consider anything less than a "pass through" to be poor penetration. If your broadhead reaches the "off-side" of the animal, it has done its job.

Yes, I like an exit hole...and pass throughs (better blood trail)....but I don't think my arrow has failed...if it does not skip through the animal and into the next county. ;)

I nearly always get pass throughs on deer, often times on hogs as well (except for big ones hit near the shoulder), but... I shoot a 70 lb. bow and my hunting arrows weigh well over 700 grs.

FLAvalanche
August 7, 2010, 06:41 PM
If you're shooting a heavy enough arrow....

That may be the problem with the hogs. I'm shooting carbon arrows. I may try some aluminum arrows and see how they work.

336A
August 7, 2010, 06:58 PM
So what is the general opinion on using a Marlin rifle chambered in .44 mag on wild pigs? Will it do the job well enough?

SciFiJim
August 7, 2010, 08:15 PM
I think a .44 mag lever rifle will do a pig just fine. A cast wide flat point bullet at under 100 yards should leave a hole on both sides. A jacketed hollow point will work well as well.

Sky
August 8, 2010, 03:43 PM
Holly Moley I not worthy!!!! Those are some truly works of art..Forgive me great master for I knew not........

Flintknapper
August 8, 2010, 06:56 PM
Sky wrote:

Holly Moley I not worthy!!!! Those are some truly works of art..Forgive me great master for I knew not........

Da Nada! ;)


Now.......grasshopper, try to snatch the pebble from my hand. :D

FLAvalanche
August 8, 2010, 09:16 PM
Yeah, a .44 Mag lever action will do just fine. I originally thought about just that with a good red dot for a pig gun until I found the .50 Beowulf. The .50 just out-cools the .44.

awtCZ
August 10, 2010, 05:46 PM
Great thread Flintknapper.

I had a friend of mine email this to me yesterday titled "interesting read" and he was right!

A little while back my BIL had some hogs tearing up his yard (he's got a creek that runs thru his woods) and we baited them up close to the house and wired a motion detector to a radio by his bed, they showed up that night and he got the biggest sow and another smaller one out his window with his Mini14. :D

Lightninstrike
August 10, 2010, 08:31 PM
I think we know where the THR moniker came from now. :)

Flintknapper
August 10, 2010, 10:53 PM
Lightninstrike wrote:

I think we know where the THR moniker came from now.

You guessed it! ;)

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/IMG_0829.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/pick_a_point.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Spearpoint.jpg


Flintknapping is a sometimes hobby of mine.

I use many of the points I make to hunt with….but mostly hunt whitetail deer with wooden arrows and flint/obsidian/bloodstone/etc….tips.

I will occasionally kill a hog with the same set-up….but normally I use aluminum arrows with metal broad-heads on them. Not because the primitive stuff won’t kill them…its just because hogs ALWAYS break your arrow (unless you get a pass-through).

With deer….I almost always get a pass-through…but if not, I still usually find the entire arrow somewhere along the blood trail (still intact).

Its harder to get pass-throughs on hogs…lots of times there will be 10”-16” of arrow sticking out the “far side”.

Sometimes a hog will reach back and bite the arrow off…but usually they just take off like a freight train through the trees, brush and greenbriar. :(

With hogs…the arrows never survive, NEVER! With aluminum arrows…it’s no big deal, I can make them up in minutes. Wooden arrows take hours…sometimes days (depending upon how fancy I make them).

Lightninstrike
August 12, 2010, 08:33 PM
That is incredibly impressive. Simply incredible. I wouldn't know where to start to do something like this. But your point is good. Feral hogs don't need artistry, they just need killing. This thread and my own recent hog hunt in Texas have taught me that.

tinygnat219
August 13, 2010, 10:20 AM
Anything new on the Hog front?

Flintknapper
August 13, 2010, 09:17 PM
tinygnat219 wrote:

Anything new on the Hog front?

Nothing worth reporting. The group I had been working on have changed their habits (very random now). The boar (amazingly) still shows every couple of nights...but always at 2-3 a.m.

We have had nothing but South West winds here for the last week or so...and that simply won't work for the area these are hogs are in. Better to be patient..and let them return to some type of reliable pattern... when visiting the bait site.

All activity around the trap has ceased. The lead sow has already taught the little ones to avoid it...or she is "woofing" a warning and taking them away if they go near it.

I may set out a few snares sometime in the next week, but I want to give them a chance to settle down and maybe get a crack at the boar.

I moved my Daughter's deer stand to a corner in the fence line...near where the hogs come to feed. I can pull an "all nighter" in the box stand if need be.

Its large enough that I can lay down for awhile if I get tired. It is carpeted, has 12 v. lighting, 12 v fan, heating (don't need that), lexan windows I can close.. if the skeeters get too bad.:(

So.......we'll just wait and see what develops. Right now...the hogs are not tearing up any of the pastures, so they are fairly safe as long as they don't provoke me. ;)

Flint.

308win
August 14, 2010, 12:00 PM
Too late to plant turnips - well maybe not where you are - but hogs love turnips. They would be a different bait and might make them react differently.

fishhawk
August 14, 2010, 12:11 PM
here on our place in louisiana ,if we see em we shoot em.

KodiakBeer
August 14, 2010, 01:45 PM
Flintknapper, you're an artist!

Flintknapper
August 14, 2010, 05:08 PM
KodiakBeer wrote:

Flintknapper, you're an artist!


Mehhh............they're just rocks.

SciFiJim
August 14, 2010, 05:32 PM
"Just rocks" is easy. Its the knowing how to make them into something usable that makes you an artist. I tried my had a flintknapping a few years ago and know how difficult it is to acquire the skill to do what you do.

Readyrod
August 20, 2010, 10:56 AM
Flint, those arrowheads are beautiful. I have a small collection of obsidian (arrowheads, knife blades, and an obsidian tool kit) that I picked up searching some corn fields in Mexico. But they aren't even close to as nice as your stuff.
Sweet.

Flintknapper
August 24, 2010, 01:11 AM
Been after this “lead sow” for awhile now.
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/MDGC0013.jpg

Finally caught up with her tonight.
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Lead_Sow_a.jpg

Not an old or large sow…but very smart nonetheless. I’ve been whittling down the herd over the last couple of weeks…but she has always managed to escape (by the skin of her teeth) each time.

It was extremely hot here today (106 F.)…..so I figured the hogs would be out early (6-8 p.m.) headed for water, and then feed briefly. Sure enough…about 8:15, here comes what is left of the herd.

They settle down on the corn placed in the road… and are feeding calmly. I am specifically after the sow…so I was looking for any good shot opportunity, but the hogs stayed bunched together despite the corn being spread out in a 20’ circle.

The sow wouldn’t come to the front of the pack, she just lagged along at the rear…not giving me any kind of a clear shot. This goes on for about 15 minutes….and now the hogs have just about cleaned up all the corn.

Then….just for a second…she moves to the edge of the herd. The sow was quartering away slightly…but that’s no problem for the SOCOM (405 gr. @ 1670 fps). I hurry to press the trigger before things change….and I’ll be danged if one of the other pigs doesn’t walk right in front of her….just as the trigger breaks.

KaaaaBoom……! Both hogs go down. The hog that walked in front of the sow is on its side spinning around. The sow is just laying there…. not moving at all (DRT).

Now… the first pig drags itself off the road and into the brush. I don’t hear anything else from it….so I assume its dead. (IT’S NOT). :(

I give the rest of the group about an hour to come back (sometimes they do), but nothing shows. I got down to go remove the two hogs from the area…but the one hog is not there (well rats..!) I find a blood trail, follow it for about 100 yds…but I can hear the hog staying just out ahead of me in the thick brush.

Decided to just back out…wait until morning (not push the animal) and see what I can find (if the Coyotes don’t find it first).

Everyone knows….I truly hate hogs…and will kill them on sight, but I dislike having one wounded. It was just a matter of bad “timing” for the bugger. I’ll track it down tomorrow.

Flint.

Flintknapper
August 24, 2010, 10:08 AM
Edit: Update….didn’t have to follow last nights blood trail too much farther to find the second hog. Coyotes made it easy for me to drag the carcass out.

They had eaten the entire rear portion….up to the rib cage.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/hog_recovered.jpg

They must not have found it until late last night; usually there would be nothing left by morning.

Now…if I can just trap the remaining six shoats….this group will be gone.

Pesky hogs!

MattTheHat
August 24, 2010, 10:51 AM
See, coyote's must like bacon too!


-Matt

FLAvalanche
August 24, 2010, 11:52 AM
What you should have said was that while the SOCOM didn't kill the first pig it did run away in two different directions. You just haven't located the back half yet...

DesmoDucRob
August 24, 2010, 12:00 PM
I can see it now: "Not again........!: the coyote thread."

Flintknapper
August 24, 2010, 01:52 PM
FLAvalanche wrote:


What you should have said was that while the SOCOM didn't kill the first pig it did run away in two different directions. You just haven't located the back half yet...

:D

Funny, but in the interest of keeping things honest (though the humor is not lost on me), I'll just have to tell the truth. ;)

As it is....I find that hog hunters are second only to fishermen...in their willingness to "embellish" the weight of hogs....and tell wild stories.

The story above...would make a good one though. Made me chuckle.


Flint.

Cobrageezer
August 25, 2010, 01:21 PM
I feel like I'm watching an endless loop of starship troopers. These things really are giant cockroches aren't they! A plauge upon them named Flint. I wish you continued sucess.

BRad704
August 25, 2010, 04:27 PM
I love this thread... :) And those handmade bows and arrows are simply amazing! I started researching how to do it a while back, and it seemed like a much more intestive and long-running project than I cared to get into...

Sebastian the Ibis
August 25, 2010, 11:52 PM
Do the Coyote's hunt hogs/piglets too, or do they just scavenge?

Those arrows are beautiful!!!

FLAvalanche
August 26, 2010, 07:14 AM
Coyotes will take a stray piglet if it's separated from the mother. They usually aren't dumb enough to take them while the mother is with them.

SuperNaut
August 26, 2010, 06:43 PM
How did I not know this thread existed?

Great stuff Flint, I hate to say I'm entertained by your misfortune, but I am. I spent a lot of time on a hog farm and people never understand when I tell them that hogs are cunning and devious and nothing at all like Wilbur. It's nice to find others who do understand.

DasFriek
August 28, 2010, 11:20 PM
I too found this in a link in another thread and im amazed at what im seeing.
I have known of the feral hog issue in the south on TV, But the size of the one taking up the whole bucket in the front end loader about made me spit out my drink. That thing is HUGE!
I love pork chops as well as the next guy, But a man needs a big Beef steak once in a while also. Too bad not much else cant be done with the excess carcasses. A pest is a pest and if it cant be used due to so many factors you gotta do what you have to at that point even if it means wasting meat.

Id love to shoot a 458 SoCom, Well even holding one would be cool. But taking a few of these pests down would be fun with that round.

You see the show "Swamp People" on one of the cable channels that follows alligator hunters who shoot them with .22lr's?
I know if i had such a dangerous animal on the other end of a rope it wouldn't be a .22lr id be pointing at it.

Any chance you've taken a few hogs with a .22? Not that i would, But hey everyone is different.
The show i watched about the hogs they used dogs to track the hogs, Mostly pit bulls for obvious reasons. But i had a hard time watching that as the dogs were getting hurt and even killed by the tusks. So im glad to see no dogs are being harmed by you using them for hunting the hogs.

How i can show sympathy for one animal and none for another is odd, But so is life i guess. I have some family in WV that would love for these hogs to show up there as they really live off the land ALOT. Plus isnt to much crops or pastures to destroy either so mainly would just be a good food source.

SSG B
September 1, 2010, 10:25 AM
Flint-

I created a log in name and password just for this thread, it has been both informative and great fun to read! Thank you.

This fall/winter we are planning a trip to somewhere to take care of these critters. There are a few questiosns that I have not seen/read the answers to through out the 22 pages. I see that you have a flashlight mounted to the hog hammer, however it appears that you have other electronic itmes mounted as well? Laser? I have read that a red lens filter on the light is less likely to "spook" them, with your experience is this something you have found to be true?

I plan on bringing an AR in .308, however the ammo has not been purchased/loaded yet. I see that you recommend a high quality projectile, is penetration preferred over expansion, or are the hogs dense enough to expand even a non-hollow point or expanding bullet? Are heavier projectiles preferred over higher velocity?

We plan on rougly a 7 day trip (which includes a whole lot of time driving south). Are there any tips you could provide on locations, or setting up that could improve our odds? Scents to both cover our own or used to attact them?

Locations? I do not know anyone personnally who has an infestation of them, and you have made it clear that your family's land is off limits to strangers, are their locations available that are not through a "hunting service"? Do land owners post their names on the state/county websites that are willing to have people hunt their land?

Thank you in advance.

EDIT- By the way the arrows, bows, and points are amazing! I could not hit the floor I am standing on with an arrow, my hat is off to those that can.

Flintknapper
September 2, 2010, 11:47 AM
SSG B wrote:

Flint-

I created a log in name and password just for this thread, it has been both informative and great fun to read! Thank you.
Welcome to THR....we are glad to have you.


I see that you have a flashlight mounted to the hog hammer, however it appears that you have other electronic itmes mounted as well? Laser?
25mW green laser and 250 lumen tactical flashlight are ALWAYS on my rifle.

When I anticipate having hogs 75 yds. or under....I will also mount another device that I have (red LED spotlight with momentary switch).

Keep in mind....all that I have mounted on my rifle is NOT necessary, it just lets me "cover all the bases" when I go out after hogs.


I have read that a red lens filter on the light is less likely to "spook" them, with your experience is this something you have found to be true?
You will find varying opinions about lens colors and hogs spooking, but yes...IMO red is the least likely to cause a reaction. Light intensity...and angle of incidence have more to do with spooking hogs than anything else.

How hogs react (or not) to light is a very involved subject and best addressed in another thread, but I would recommend that you use a light that is NOT "filtered"....but starts as a pure color/wavelength (such as Cree LED's).


I plan on bringing an AR in .308, however the ammo has not been purchased/loaded yet.
.308 is more than enough for any hog (assuming proper shot placement).


I see that you recommend a high quality projectile, is penetration preferred over expansion, or are the hogs dense enough to expand even a non-hollow point or expanding bullet?
Ideally....you want both. Any modern bullet designed for hunting medium to large game will give you adequate performance. Stay away from FMJ (full metal jacket) rounds.


Are heavier projectiles preferred over higher velocity?
Conventional wisdom when hunting hogs....is to lean towards the heavier side of bullet weight for any given cartridge. The reason for this...is that you don't know what size hog you will encounter.

Where I hunt, I am just as likely to see a 250+ lb. boar as a 100 lb. sow.
Also, you might not be presented with a perfectly broadside shot. Heavier bullets (of like construction) tend to penetrate deeper and hold their energy better.

The importance of this (to me) is that it affords you more options in terms of shot angles....while still being ethical.

We plan on rougly a 7 day trip (which includes a whole lot of time driving south). Are there any tips you could provide on locations, or setting up that could improve our odds?
Depending upon where you go....baiting hogs might be legal and if possible to have someone put out bait a couple of days before your arrival...it should make a difference. Just depends upon where you go and how you intend to hunt them.

Scents to both cover our own or used to attact them?
I am not adverse to using certain scents to attract hogs (sow in heat for boars), but you can save your money on "cover up" scents.

Odor eliminating products are worthwhile....but forget about "covering" your scent. It just isn't going happen. Hogs have the best nose in the business and can literally detect several parts per million of scent. Just do what you can to remain as scent free as possible...and use the wind to your advantage (always stay downwind of where you expect to see hogs).


Do land owners post their names on the state/county websites that are willing to have people hunt their land?
In Texas....nearly all land is privately owned. I am sure there are persons somewhere....willing to let "responsible" hunters enter their property to hunt hogs....but I do not have any lists.

It is sad, but in these litigious times....it has become increasingly difficult to find a landowner who will permit a person he does not know... onto his property (for any reason).

If you know the region you wish to hunt, then checking with game officials from that area, county extension agents or the owners of local feed stores "might" turn up a lead for you.

Otherwise, you will be relegated to paying for a hunt somewhere (probably your best bet anyway).

Good luck to you.


Flint.

TuckerNielson
September 2, 2010, 04:19 PM
Thanks for the hours of entertainment Flint. Keep up the posts and the pictures. this is absolutely fascinating for me. Here in Utah we have some BIG feral hogs but to my knowledge they aren't the problem that they are in other areas of the country.

Thanks again.

azar
September 2, 2010, 06:11 PM
I've never heard of feral hogs in Utah. Are they isolated escapees or is there a stable population? I thought I'd like to have hogs to hunt until I read through this thread (great read, btw!). Now, I just want to keep them as far from the elk, mule deer, pronghorn, moose, bison, and sheep habitat as I can!

I'd do my part to go a shoot one though... Just sayin'. :D

Thatguy686
September 7, 2010, 11:29 AM
Flint any updates on this whole ordeal I been following it and am interested pls don't let this thread die

Flintknapper
September 7, 2010, 04:30 PM
I'll update as I can, been busy putting away hay....and rebuilding the auto trans in my old Ranch Truck (yee-hah........). :(


Flint

Delta Wing
September 10, 2010, 11:56 AM
Hi Flint,

Been reading this thread for a while and to me its just like an adventure book or kinda TV series to be followed and see what comes up next. You see where I live(Geneva, Switzerland) hunting is totally banned(but not on owning how many number of guns you may have), although, on some parts of Switzerland it is allowed. Unfortunately, as one firing range buddy told me that you have to earn the license by studying it out for a full year(you have to attend one session each week) to be able to get one(license). You guys (Stateside) are pretty darn lucky to be able to hunt by just purchasing a license(I presume) and being able to hunt all sorts of game and the whole year round(for feral hogs)for that matter. Here, I'd just have to be contented on just shooting target sheets. I have cousins there in Texas('think near Houston) and hopefully would be able to go there with my family for a vacation next year. Planning to be left behind and stay a bit to have an experience in feral hog hunting and taste how good its meat for barbecue with beer.

Hope your truck gets fixed real soon so you can start again to update this thread.

More power to you and good hunting.


Best regards,

Robert

Flintknapper
September 10, 2010, 05:51 PM
Robert....I hope you get the chance to visit your family here.

Let me be the first to extend a warm welcome and I hope your time spent in Texas will be enjoyable for you and your family.

Thank you...also for your post. It is a good reminder for we Americans of the Freedoms and liberties we enjoy.... (that are often times taken for granted).


Take care Sir,

Flint.

ColdDeadHand
September 19, 2010, 07:21 PM
I had to google this. Just had to. I'll also have to name a heavy metal band after it. "Judas Sow"


http://www.agpub.on.ca/pork/apr98/div1.htm
"Judas pig
Australian officials are using an old farm ploy to control a spiraling wild pig population that is threatening farmers' crops and livestock herd health.
The age-old practice of using a "Judas" member of the herd to lead the rest to slaughter has been adapted with some success by Australian wildlife officials trying to control wild pig herds, reports the Western Producer.
Wild pigs are captured, coddled, fitted with radio transmitters and released back into the wild, where they lead hunters to the wild herds. The method, which takes advantage of the animals' socializing behaviour, also works in controlling wild buffalo, cattle, donkeys and goats.
As well as inflicting up to $100 million in damages to crops, fences, water supplies and even lambs, the wild pigs are potential carriers of devastating diseases such as hoof and mouth.
While each Judas sow makes contact with up to eight other pigs in a week, Aussie eradication programs have had at best an 85-per cent success rate, not high enough to control epidemics, say officials."

Flintknapper
September 20, 2010, 12:03 AM
They need to "fit them" with a pound of C-4 and a remote detonator.

Set it off when they rejoin the herd. ;)

But with hogs....new ones would somehow sprout from the pieces, you just can't get rid of them once they are established. :(

ranger_ric
September 22, 2010, 11:11 AM
NOW That is a "pig BOMB"!


Flintknapper I too have truly enjoyed your posts in this hogwild drama.

Be Blessed

Flynt
October 8, 2010, 03:06 PM
Delta Wing wrote,

You see where I live(Geneva, Switzerland) hunting is totally banned(but not on owning how many number of guns you may have), although, on some parts of Switzerland it is allowed. Unfortunately, as one firing range buddy told me that you have to earn the license by studying it out for a full year(you have to attend one session each week) to be able to get one(license).

Robert, that's interesting. My wife and I were just in Switzerland a couple of weeks ago. My impression was that guns and hunting were roughly similar to the U.S. I found a nice gun store in alte stadt Luzern. We took the cog wheel train up to Mt. Pilatus. On the way up we noticed the descending train pick up a couple of hunters with rifles. I guess hunting and firearms laws vary enourmously from canton to canton. Is the French-speaking portion of Switzerland more anti-hunting than the rest?

tommyintx
October 9, 2010, 05:08 PM
Flint, do you load your own .458? or reload?

Flintknapper
October 9, 2010, 09:15 PM
Hi Tommy,

I'm a reloader of many years....so I "brew up" my own for the SOCOM as well.

The main advantage (besides cost savings) is that I can load anything from a 100 gr. pill (yes 100 gr.) up to 600 gr. sledgehammers.

There is a very good choice of bullet weights/types in .458 caliber.

CaliforniaDreamin
October 12, 2010, 08:39 PM
This was an amazing thread...

I was born in Oklahoma and the only thing worse than an Okie is a Texan... Texans are just stubborn. Im glad im in California.

I currently live in California, California has no feral hog problem because owners charge people $400 a day per person to hunt feral hogs on their property. The $400 dollars I am sure covers their Insurance, their Boat and their Lamborghini payments. The business has grown to the point that private landowners are leasing government lands just so that they can further control the amount of hogs that are killed, so they can keep their businesses thriving.

The military bases here let you hunt for free but there are so many hunters that we kill most of the hogs on the bases, in addition The hogs usually run over to privately leased land, where the property leasors tend to keep them fed. Basically the state of california issues 56,000 Hog Tags a year and we are currently only killing between 3k to 4K hogs.

As long as the person signs an unconditional release of liability, you should have no problem letting hunters on your land to solve your problem. If you Texans really wanted to solve this problem people from California would come to Texas by the bus loads and do it for you. if you would let us on your Property.

Its amazing with all of the knowleged that Flintknapper has you would not have people sign a simple release and allow them to hunt on your land. In my opinion you enjoy it, you like killing. killing is fun, you are a true soldier, so go and kill them critters.:fire:

If you decide that you do not want to KILL EM... then just put em in a VERY BIG TRUCK and dump them off over at any army or Air Force base... We'll take care of the rest. Just understand that you will be making MANY MANY young men and women happy. The future of our country depends on it.:D

I would like to add one more thing.... BOOMER SOONER!! :neener: We got you guys this year... Yea Baby.

Flintknapper
October 13, 2010, 08:39 PM
CD, I really don't know what to say....except: I will PAY YOU to stay in California.

Just let me know what it will take. ;) :neener:




Flint.

countertop
October 13, 2010, 11:14 PM
I'd happily throw in a few bucks too.

Lightninstrike
October 14, 2010, 07:20 PM
Hi Tommy,

I'm a reloader of many years....so I "brew up" my own for the SOCOM as well.

The main advantage (besides cost savings) is that I can load anything from a 100 gr. pill (yes 100 gr.) up to 600 gr. sledgehammers.

There is a very good choice of bullet weights/types in .458 caliber.
Okay, I have just got to ask. Flint, what do you shoot with a 100 grain bullet in a .458 Socom? Varmints?

tommyintx
October 19, 2010, 01:22 AM
a 100 grain in a .458 socom would destroy just about anything on the planet inside of 200 yards. Bullet weight is just one factor. You have to realize with that light of a bullet the velocity advantage.

Flint, i found about 25 pcs once fired .458 brass when i posted that. I found about another 25-30 today, and remembered to check back and see if you needed it. Once i get a few hundred, i'll send it your way, if you'd like. Nobody around here shoots it, so it'd just end up in the buckets that get sold for scrap..

Flintknapper
October 19, 2010, 09:42 AM
tommyintx wrote:


a 100 grain in a .458 socom would destroy just about anything on the planet inside of 200 yards. Bullet weight is just one factor. You have to realize with that light of a bullet the velocity advantage.
It makes for a pretty explosive round. As you point out, velocity is "right up there".... with some folks reporting 3,000 fps from a 16" barrel.

The projectile is aluminum (hard alloy) with a generous hollow point. Its actually not a small bullet, just lightweight.
http://lehighbullets.com/products.asp?cat=19

Flint, i found about 25 pcs once fired .458 brass when i posted that. I found about another 25-30 today, and remembered to check back and see if you needed it. Once i get a few hundred, i'll send it your way, if you'd like. Nobody around here shoots it, so it'd just end up in the buckets that get sold for scrap

You have PM.

stsimons
October 19, 2010, 05:16 PM
http://lehighbullets.com/products.asp?cat=19

Wow! a 10ft muzzle flash!!! I suppose if you snuck up on a hog not only would you turn him into sausage but you could grill him at the same time!!! I bet that is spectacular to witness in person.

Lancel
October 20, 2010, 12:14 AM
Flint, those bullets look great but they make me paranoid because

"to eliminate the potential for aluminum oxide formation, the bullets are coated with a dry film lube ..."

Aluminum oxide is very, very hard.
Since aluminum yearns to make that oxide instantly on exposure to air, I would be afraid of the lube rubbing off in a spot or two. Then I would be sending material that sharpens knives down my rifling. :(

Just sayin',
Larry

seal
October 20, 2010, 12:42 PM
i cant seem to find the hogs around here. So not all of texas is as overrun as id like. but we do have a deer or 6 on property. but ill be if i cant find a hog to shoot and cook before nov 2nd!

Delta Wing
October 24, 2010, 10:09 AM
Flynt wrote:

Robert, that's interesting. My wife and I were just in Switzerland a couple of weeks ago. My impression was that guns and hunting were roughly similar to the U.S. I found a nice gun store in alte stadt Luzern. We took the cog wheel train up to Mt. Pilatus. On the way up we noticed the descending train pick up a couple of hunters with rifles. I guess hunting and firearms laws vary enourmously from canton to canton. Is the French-speaking portion of Switzerland more anti-hunting than the rest?


Hi Flynt,

Sorry for the late reply. How did you find Switzerland,especially, Luzerne? 'Was busy with the research for the guns listed in a catalog sent to me by a local auction gunhouse. So many guns at a very much attractive price. Hundreds of guns to choose from but hundreds more short of buns(doe) to have them. Hahaha! PM me if you want to know the website just to checkout what they are offering.

Seriously speaking, well your impressions with guns are right on being roughly similar with the U.S. IMHO, even much more better and liberal. Where can you find a country which subsidizes the ammo (applies to 7.5 x55mm, 5.56 Nato and 9mmP) for the civilians to shoot their(Swiss military type issued) weapons at a military range. Except on owning full autos and CCW which can be discussed on other threads. Almost the same gun rules apply here to all cantons as far as I know unlike in your states like NY, NJ CA etc. where you have a more stricter and varied rules.

As to hunting, yes the rules differ from canton to canton but its not generally speaking that the French-speaking cantons of Switzerland are anti-hunting. It is only here in Geneva where I heard of such total ban on hunting. Perhaps, its just the small size and geography of the canton. FYI, Geneva has not much forest around thus wildlife barely exist where hikers could very much occasionally actually encounter or see game animals. As for the other cantons where hunting are allowed, wild boars and deers are the usual fare, although, 'haven't heard of such infestations of wild boars in this part of Europe. If there was, perhaps, I might have tasted its meat with their excesses. Have heard from friends who works in the household with hunters as masters that they bring in such games when the season is up. Unfortunate for me, haven't tried seeing or even tasting these wild games.

Tell me something about your hunting experience there in your part of the country for I am hungry for such stories since I have none to tell you back.

Best regards and happy hunting,

Robert:D

P.S.

@ Flintnapper: Been missing your pix. Hope you're already done with the hay stacking and the auto trans of your truck. Best regards too!

Double Naught Spy
October 24, 2010, 03:38 PM
I currently live in California, California has no feral hog problem because owners charge people $400 a day per person to hunt feral hogs on their property.
You transplanted Okie's are naive. California doesn't have a feral hog problem? Are you kidding? Your feral hog population is both growing in numbers and expanding in geographical range.
http://westernfarmpress.com/california-wild-pig-population-far-larger-imagined
http://www.sibr.com/mammals/M176.html
http://www.gilroydispatch.com/lifestyles/contentview.asp?c=135544
http://www.trailcenter.org/newsletter/2000/spring2000/spring2000-05.htm
http://www.berkeleydailyplanet.com/issue/2001-05-21/article/5038?headline=Burgeoning-wild-pigs-force-parks-to-hire-trappers&status=301
http://www.almanacnews.com/morgue/2002/2002_09_04.pvpigs.html
http://www.almanacnews.com/morgue/2000/2000_03_15.pigs1.html
http://www.pigs4ever.com/news/rooting_for_relief.htm

As long as the person signs an unconditional release of liability, you should have no problem letting hunters on your land to solve your problem. If you Texans really wanted to solve this problem people from California would come to Texas by the bus loads and do it for you. if you would let us on your Property.

Funny how people who don't have land in Texas are so fond of saying this and it is incorrect, but if you believe feral hogs aren't a problem in CA, then you will likely believe anything.

Problem is, such releases of liability do not free the landowner of liability if the hunter kills a 3rd party not included on the liability release, such as a person on the next property, out on the road, coming to visit, etc.

Unconditional liability releases don't stop lawsuits.

It does not happen often, but when it does, the landowner can be saddled with losses that s/he can't afford and hence risk losing all or part of the property in question if s/he can't pay.
http://www.totalinjury.com/news/articles/state-personal-injury-laws/pennsylvania-shuts-down-hunters.aspx

This incident didn't have the hunter on private land, but it very well could have. The result is the same. He screwed up and shot a person on a different property.
http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/New-York-Deer-Hunter-Kills-Toddler-Man-Shot-Girl-With-Rifle-By-Mistake/Article/200811315153759

tommyintx
October 30, 2010, 09:27 PM
Alright, not only is flint slacking, but i'm tired of him getting to have all the fun.

My little trap (8' x 4' x 4') just isnt' cutting it anymore.

So out came the cutting torch, old fencing material, hog panels, some metal grating, some square tubing, etc..

A little engineering..

A little welding.. And she's almost done.

tommyintx
October 30, 2010, 09:28 PM
Forgot the picture. :)

sargas23
November 2, 2010, 08:56 AM
CaliforniaDreamin,

Please stay in **********. The last thing we need is a bunch of yahoos who know NOTHING about feral hog control coming onto our private property and shooting the place up. Since this was your one and only post, I strongly suspect you are some sort of a troll, especially due to the comments you made to Flint about killing, etc. I have you on permanent "ignore" status now.

Buck Snort
November 3, 2010, 08:05 AM
CaliforniaDreamin,

Please stay in **********. The last thing we need is a bunch of yahoos who know NOTHING about feral hog control coming onto our private property and shooting the place up. Since this was your one and only post, I strongly suspect you are some sort of a troll, especially due to the comments you made to Flint about killing, etc. I have you on permanent "ignore" status now.
You took his post WAY too seriously. He was just pull'n yer layg.

sargas23
November 4, 2010, 07:57 AM
Buck,

Maybe so, but I still think that person is a troll.:barf:

acoop101
November 15, 2010, 01:33 AM
I hope you don't hold this against all of us, I was born in California but I am trying to get out. I have enjoyed reading this thread and it pisses me off how california dreaming adds to the california steriotype. Good luck and I hope your hog problem doesn't get too too out of hand.

Flintknapper
November 15, 2010, 06:47 AM
Welcome to the forum acoop.

No....I would never let the rants of one person...color my opinion of other people (let alone an entire State).

There are many fine people in California (and elsewhere).

Flint.

Buck Snort
November 16, 2010, 02:13 PM
welcome to the forum acoop. No....i would never let the rants of one person...color my opinion of other people (let alone an entire state). There are many fine people in california (and elsewhere).

Flint.
That's me!!

RedNeck99
December 1, 2010, 12:16 PM
i got a 12 gage, 30-06, .22, and a 44 super black hawk. when and where

harryheadshot
December 13, 2010, 07:09 PM
Flint, You are one bad mutha, this entire thread was better than most hunting shows on the boob tube, thanx for the effort and the pics man.

harryheadshot
December 13, 2010, 07:17 PM
I agree Flint, yhis entire thread was better than most of the hunting shows on these days, maybe someone should just pay you GOOD and film your day to day indeavers. Keep 'em comin brother.

Flintknapper
December 13, 2010, 09:39 PM
harryheadshot

this entire thread was better than most hunting shows on the boob tube, thanx for the effort and the pics man

Welcome to the forum HHS and Thank You for your kind words.

Once Deer Season is over here...I will be back to slaying pigs (as they appear).

It is not anything I relish, just something done out of necessity.

But, if sharing my experiences will in any way help someone else, then I am glad to do it.

Flint.

Erik M
December 19, 2010, 09:32 PM
I don't know how I have been on THR for so long and missed out on this incredible thread. Flint, I admire both your commitment and penmanship, your thread is much appreciated. Now you've got me looking up the regulations on hunting wild boar in Kentucky, which I have found to be year round.

45-70 Ranger
December 20, 2010, 12:07 PM
Flintknapper,

Love the work you're doing. Both the primitive archery (a passion of mine as well) and the whackin' of hogs. After I retired from the P.D., like most of my peers, I moved away from the city I worked in and went to quieter locations.

Ended up in East Texas and found a job supervising a small security unit at a semi-inactive power station out in the woods. There are several sq. miles of woods and pasture infested with hogs! The mgr. of the site has a guy that sets traps all over the place and they do haul out several hogs a week. But, they're still destroying stuff right and left......

So the mgr., knowing I'm a hunter, requested me to go out and kill as many of these beasties as possible. So not being one to sit on my backside, I ventured out with my trusty .45-70 (Marlin Guide Gun) loaded up with 340 gr. LRNFP's at a modest 1350 FPS, and started blastin' piggies. Even smacked 3 with a Remington .44 C&B revolver. It is a blast.

This started in June. To date, going out only on Fri. of each week, I was able to do in two dozen hogs up to late Oct. then the hogs were not moving as much in the day. Most were out beyond my range and not easy to reach. But as winter is approaching, these large rodents have taken to the woods and are nowhere to be seen. See, only on Fri. there is no others on the site and that is the only day I have to go out, but still work the site as well. I'm limited to driving on the dirt roads that go through the area and then stop and get out to pop 'em. No night hunts as my midnight officer is a little "squirrely" and likely to do something stupid and get us both hurt.

But back to you and your continuing saga, it is something else. You sure have your hands full and at the same time are having a time of it whackin those little fur covered tanks. Have they receeded back into the deep woods on you as well?

Your flint work is great. My stuff is actually I guess "Iron Age" as I dowel out my own shafts and forage my broadheads from iron and such. Longbows and recurves are the only thing in my area all with Flemish strings. My son is allowed to shoot his....ah...compound,( Yetch, I said the "C" word!)...sometimes....if he is a good lad when he and the grandkids come to visit and shoot. But, yes, you have a real talent for the rocks! Salute!!

Well, I'd better get back to work...might just have a visitor today. Maybe not, but I'll go anyway. Have fun with those pesky piggies!

Wade

Flintknapper
December 20, 2010, 03:19 PM
45-70 Ranger wrote:


Ended up in East Texas and found a job supervising a small security unit at a semi-inactive power station out in the woods. There are several sq. miles of woods and pasture infested with hogs! The mgr. of the site has a guy that sets traps all over the place and they do haul out several hogs a week. But, they're still destroying stuff right and left......
Hello Wade, welcome to the THR forum.

Yes, sounds like typical hogs. They are capable of doing a lot of damage in a short period of time. I am all too familiar with that.


So the mgr., knowing I'm a hunter, requested me to go out and kill as many of these beasties as possible. I ventured out with my trusty .45-70 (Marlin Guide Gun) loaded up with 340 gr. LRNFP's at a modest 1350 FPS, and started blastin' piggies.
Smart manager...and I like your choice of cartridge (.45-70). If you reload... there is a plethora of bullets to choose from these days. My dedicated hog gun is a .458 SOCOM built on an AR platform. So we use the same diameter/type bullets.


I'm limited to driving on the dirt roads that go through the area and then stop and get out to pop 'em. No night hunts
Well....I'd say you are doing pretty good...considering the circumstances. Your hog control is confined to targets of opportunity only.


Have they receeded back into the deep woods on you as well?
Presently yes. It is still Deer Season here and hunting pressure affects how many hogs we see. Also, there is a lot activity going on...with a Natural Gas pipeline going in on the property and seismograph work being done. But they'll be back, they always come back. :(

Good luck with your pigs Sir!


Flint.

Harley Quinn
December 24, 2010, 01:56 PM
Flint,
Great thread, have viewed its entirety this morn...Thanks for the education and all your effort...

I was wondering as I read this thread, how you came up with your handle, found out in the bow and arrows section about 20 pages in:D Old Bowman myself early 60's with Tom Jennings pre compound, nice group of bows/arrows/heads etc...

Sorry about the guy from CA coming in and mucking it up at the end of the read...:( Maybe someone ought to ask a mod to delete him;)

Thank you very much...

Hope you have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year, I am looking to read more, as time goes on...

Sure made my day :)

Regards

Flintknapper
December 28, 2010, 07:46 PM
A question I often get:

How do I know if I have hogs?

For the benefit of those just getting started, some examples of common Hog Sign.

First, it is important to recognize that “hog sign” can appear differently in different parts of the country. The photos I have posted represent what you might expect to see in Deep East Texas (Mesic Upland).

I have tried to provide examples of “sign” that would be readily apparent to the casual observer. Hogs do leave other sign…less obvious and more difficult to discern, but we’ll leave that for another time.

We can begin with tracks. Hog tracks are generally fairly small (2” to 3-1/2”) since their hooves tend to be small in relation to body size.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/front_hooves.jpg

But, can be larger… as in this pic.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/bigtrack1.jpg


In soft soil or mud…the print of the “dew claw” often appears as in the pic above. Hog tracks differ from deer tracks significantly…in that they exhibit a more rounded “toe” (tip of hoof) and the overall geometry is roughly 2/3rds width per length. Once you’ve seen a few…they are easy to recognize.

Another common “sign” left by hogs are “rootings”. These will vary greatly in size and depth depending upon terrain and the food source sought out. Hog rootings range from the nearly unnoticeable (leaves and debris gently pushed up), to an entire field being damaged with pot holes as deep as 18”.

These small rootings are about average for this part of the country:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Rootings.jpg


If the property you hunt is fenced (barbed wire), search the bottom strands for evidence of hog hair that is sometimes caught in the fence where they go under:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Hog_Hair.jpg


Hogs tend to be creatures of habit and will use the same trail repeatedly. Trails that lead to and from water/food sources or bedding areas… are often well worn and easily noticed:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Hog_Trail.jpg

Look for hog tracks in these trails to confirm the presence of pigs…(Remember, other animals make trails too).



One of the more noticeable and reliable indicators of hog presence are “rubs”. Rubs are objects that hogs “rub” against after “wallowing” in mud in order to remove parasites.

Most often this will be a tree, but hogs also LOVE fence posts and telephone poles that are treated with creosote. In any case, you will notice the mud left behind… and can tell the frequency in which they use the area by how “worn” the tree/post/object is. Examples:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Hog_Rub.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/kreso_tree.jpg

Continued Below:

Flintknapper
December 28, 2010, 07:48 PM
“Wallows” can take many forms. Basically, any place that provides a wet muddy environment can be used…but hogs do have preferred areas.

This pond has low banks (easily accessed), is fairly open (allows hog to see what is coming) and is in close proximity to cover…so they use it most often:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Pond_2.jpg


But, they will use something as small as a depression in a pasture…in order to soothe themselves:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Field_Damage.jpg



You can also “listen” for hogs. A group of hogs (a sounder)…can be quite vocal if not alarmed and going about their normal routine. Grunting and squealing is commonly heard, but they do make other sounds depending upon circumstance.

Juvenile boars in a group are fond of sparring and competing for food. They are responsible for much of the “squealing” you will hear as they engage one another:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/boarsfight1.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/boarsfight2.jpg

Continued Below:

Flintknapper
December 28, 2010, 07:52 PM
A couple of things to look for when pursuing “mature boars” are beds and “boar cuts”.

Mature boars are solitary animals and do NOT travel with the group (sounder) unless estrous sows are present. They will then briefly join the group…or hang around the periphery…until the sows have been covered.

Often times… a boar will bed down near (but not with) the group. This “bed” is usually nothing more than a cleared off spot (unless grassy) next to some type of structure/cover. Example:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Boar_Bed.jpg


Mature boars are very territorial…and will “mark” their territory with urine (not unlike male dogs and cats) but they also make “visual” markings that other boars can see and smell.

“Boar Cuts” are made when a boar uses his tusks to “rake/cut” a tree. Often… the tree selected will be one that oozes a resin (pine and cedar around here).

The resulting wound is easily seen and smelled by other boars in the area.

Clearly, not all areas of the country have trees that can be assaulted, but for those that do, watch for them.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Fresh_Cut_1.jpg

Closer look:
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Fresh_Cut_2.jpg


Of course the most telling of sign is: “Tracks with the hogs still in them” ;)

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/tall_athletic.jpg



Flint.

BigRobT
January 1, 2011, 06:29 PM
I moved back to North Central Texas a couple of years ago. I can't seem to find any place that will let me come hunt these little beasties without having to pay far more than they're worth. Have gun, will hunt....

JTH
January 1, 2011, 06:41 PM
Flintknapper,
I've live in various areas of East Texas from Lake Fork down to Huntsville over the last 15 years. All rural areas have a feral hog problems. Where were those pics taken, if you don't mind? The problem is bad even in Cental Texas. Had friends up in NE Tx.(Atlanta, Tx. area) that would let trappers come in and set their traps to remove feral hogs from their land. Don't know if they charged them or not. If you get pics of Hogzilla, post them.

I had to go back and start reading through the posts. What great pics and information, I'm not much of a hunter but I know of the problems in East Texas. Lived a year East of Austin and they have the same problems with feral hogs. Seen a special on the feral hog problems all the way to Georgia in the U.S. and the study they were doing comparing this species to the wild hogs of Europe.
JT

thexrayboy
January 2, 2011, 12:16 AM
This thread was linked over at another forum, I just finished reading the entire
thing and found it very informative and entertaining. It's probably been two years
since I last posted here at THR but this thread is a definite gem.

Makes me glad we don't have hogs here in the Great Basin desert....at least not yet.
I have had the occasional run in with black bears here and while they are probably
as smart as hogs and can with adequate incentive be amazingly destructive they
just don't seem to pose the problems that hogs do. Probably because they are fewer
in numbers and simply cannot breed as fast as hogs. Guess I'll just have to content
myself with thinning the coyote population from time to time.

JShirley
January 2, 2011, 09:21 AM
Wow, great thread. Sorry I missed this previously.

Your arrows and arrowheads are works of art~ beautiful.

John

Flintknapper
January 2, 2011, 07:20 PM
Noticed about 30 "Pot-Holes" in one of the pastures yesterday.

Got a pic this morning of a medium sized Boar in the same area (probably the culprit).

I'm hoping he'll just move on....but if he wants to stick around and "play", I just finished loading a bunch of bullets for my SOCOM. His choice...... ;)

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/med_boar_4.jpg


Flint.

thralldad
January 2, 2011, 08:37 PM
Hi Flint;
New to this forum. I grew up in DET, Newton to be exact. I remember when the stock laws of the early 70s were put into place to try to control the feral hog population. Unfortunately hogs don't follow the rules!

6.5swede
January 3, 2011, 07:15 PM
This is how we hunt them in FL! :D

RudeMood
January 4, 2011, 07:42 AM
The "hog sign" posts were very informative Flint. Being Texas born and grown I knew what a Hog Footprint looked like, but not the other signs that make perfect sense in your pictures. I appreciate you helping me track these buggers, as I have made it my own personal crusade to clear as many out as I can when I visit the lease in South Texas.

Cheers sir, good luck, and good work.

Flintknapper
January 4, 2011, 07:53 AM
Looks relaxing Swede……….. but, this is how we do it TEXAS STYLE: ;)

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Stack_O_Hogs.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Hog_Buggy.jpg

Harley Quinn
January 4, 2011, 08:14 AM
Flint...
That is some serious killing of hogs:what:

:)

Flintknapper
January 4, 2011, 04:23 PM
Harley,

I don't know the origin of either photo. I have seen both posted other places on-line, I don't think the two are even related.

I post it here only in "jest"... (it is not me, just want to be clear).

I don't know the circumstances under which the "pile" of hogs were dispatched, but it is consistent with the numbers taken during Helicopter excursions.

Some ranches (primarily in South Texas) employ the use of a Helicopter and a "shooter" to fly over semi-open terrain and shoot as many of the pests as can be found.

I have heard reports of upwards of 150 hogs being taken in a couple hours of flying time.

It is not a viable technique for the thick woods where I live (Deep East Texas).


Flint.

Shadow 7D
January 4, 2011, 04:30 PM
Flint
just wanted to let you know, that after reading this thread, I actually consider getting an AR, even though after I got out of the army, I said I was done with them. I wish I had relatives in that part of the TX, so I could visit them and 'help out'...

rogn
January 4, 2011, 07:59 PM
Mr Flint, now that you have served us up a spendid, free feast of hog lure, and weaponry, I have one request - can you put your manied talents to creating a book on these many aspects of HOG. I would stand in line out in the snow for a copy. !!! The depth of your knapery(?) is very impressive also. I realize youve worked with the stones and followed what the art dictated. THe question I have is there any literature that you would recommend to someone wishing to read of the art and perhaps wishing to dabble in it. Thank You for all the information, enlightenment and entertainment. Best of luck with this plague of rooting cock roaches.

MidWestDisappearance
January 4, 2011, 10:50 PM
flint,
I must say you have reached guru status. hog control is tricky enough, but firearm knowledge and lets not forget the years of practice needed to become proficient at skills like flintknapping and arrow building. i half expect a bit on home building white water canoes,lol.
anyway, thanks for the entertainment, the information, and the committment it takes to keep a thread going this long.
S.

Chainsaw2
January 5, 2011, 09:44 PM
I haven't read the entire thread, but does anyone poison hogs? As prolific as they are, it would seem to be a good idea even if it is a nasty way to do things. Normally, I don't hold with poison, but if your place is being ruined...

jim

Shadow 7D
January 5, 2011, 10:47 PM
question is where the hogs end up, and what else the poison would work on
add to it that hogs are damn resistant, in California, my neighbor used to be in the land business (his family holds/held a huge amount of land. A number of the ranchers would turn their pigs loose to clear out the rattlesnakes, the pigs blood was more toxic, and they resistant to the snake venom than the snake was to the pigs.

Flintknapper
January 5, 2011, 10:57 PM
Chainsaw2 wrote:


I haven't read the entire thread, but does anyone poison hogs?
No doubt, someone has tried....but it is ILLEGAL in the State of Texas to do so.


As prolific as they are, it would seem to be a good idea even if it is a nasty way to do things.
Sterilization might be a more viable means. Poisoning has the potential to create many problems. But, neither method will be developed/practiced by the State any time soon (if ever).


Normally, I don't hold with poison, but if your place is being ruined..

Conventional methods...(Shooting, Trapping, Snaring, Aerial, Dogs) can be somewhat effective IF the landowner can devote the time and monetary resources to it.

At some point, it must be determined WHO'S problem the hogs are: The landowner or the State's.

At present...the landowner bears the burden, with no significant help from the State (save for literature and information).

Shadow 7D
January 6, 2011, 04:51 PM
Flint, maybe someone will do to the hogs what happened in Europe with rabbits, Myxomatosis, a virus (used in Australia in the 60's) was released by a french scientist who was annoyed at the bunnies eating the shrubbery on his estate, it has decimated the rabbit populations in Europe and Great Brittan and wiped out many a rabbitry.

Maybe someone could give the wild pigs a nice case of super swine flu, but remember I'm a vegetarian and don't eat bacon.....

Cougfan2
January 7, 2011, 12:58 PM
I saw this interesting article about Texas considering using a special poison and bait holders to poison feral hogs.

http://www.kens5.com/news/Wildlife-Services-experimenting-with-new-safe-way-to-poison-feral-hogs--113037454.html

Harley Quinn
January 7, 2011, 01:36 PM
Regarding the time frame of fatality...If it is to soon the other hogs will see dead and put two and two togeather and not eat from the hopper IMHO...

Then you have dead hogs that will be eaten by other hogs and so on...Other animals that eat the hogs will be involved also I would think:confused:

I am sure all the above will be researched, but how well can only be found out in a test run or two in the more infested area of TX you would think:uhoh:

Cougfan2
January 7, 2011, 01:41 PM
I too will be interested to see the test results. While I am sure they are desperate for a solution, putting poison into the food chain can have some really nasty unintended consequences.

Flintknapper
January 7, 2011, 03:41 PM
I am certainly not trying to discourage efforts to reduce Feral Hog populations, but I don't see the method posted above as having much potential.

IMO, the delivery system (the hopper)...is as least 50% of the problem. The toxin itself (probably Sodium Nitrite) could also be problematic...depending upon how it is encapsulated.

Sodium Nitrite is highly toxic to pigs (and in sufficient amounts...to other vertebrates as well).

Problem is: It is very soluble, extremely hygroscopic, and is biodegradable.

So...unless it is encapsulated in some type of paraffin base (or other water resistant bait body)...then it won't last long if exposed to the elements.

There are other hazards associated with it...as well, but most could be "worked around".

It is the delivery system ( proposed hopper) that I see as the biggest stumbling block. The design too heavily relies on a hog's instinct to "root" and ignores the MANY other factors involved in getting them to consistently feed at the station. The list is long!

Cost and application are other areas of concern. If the program were not State sponsored or subsidized...I wouldn't expect to see it implemented to a degree likely to have much effect.

IMO, (as currently proposed)....this is more an effort to create a money making "industry" than it is a practical solution to the problem.

Just my .02 on it.

Flint.

pacpiper
January 7, 2011, 03:49 PM
14 or so Boars @ $500 a head and you'd be making out like......er,.....flint!

Flintknapper
January 11, 2011, 02:51 PM
Shadow 7D wrote:

Flint
just wanted to let you know, that after reading this thread, I actually consider getting an AR, even though after I got out of the army, I said I was done with them


Not necessary to have an AR to hunt hogs. A rifle on an AR platform works for me and suits my situation....but any decent rifle will work. Just get out there and help reduce the population.

P.S., Thank you for your service Sir!


Flint

FLAvalanche
January 13, 2011, 08:58 PM
14 or so Boars @ $500 a head and you'd be making out like......er,.....flint!
If there was a $500 bounty on every hogs head we wouldn't have a hog problem...

Flintknapper
January 13, 2011, 11:09 PM
FLAvalanche wrote:

If there was a $500 bounty on every hogs head we wouldn't have a hog problem...

True.

Though we'd probably swap a hog problem for a poaching problem.... folks would be in the woods day and night chasing after hogs.

I'd wager a significant dent could be put in the population at $50.00 a head.

Johnny_Come_Lately
January 17, 2011, 06:13 AM
Flint

Never before have so enjoyed a thread as I have enjoyed this one!

Thanks

CrotKlauberi
January 17, 2011, 06:19 PM
Pics from Arizona. I dont know if anyone on here has experience hunting them out here...they are not nearly as abundant and seem to be very localized around permanent water. This spot is a ways out in the wilderness. I saw 3 pigs (or asses of pigs) when i hiked through the canyon but it seems like baiting is going to have to be the way to get them.

How fast do pigs usually respond to bait?

how long will say 50 pounds of buried corn and spread around last?

any suggestions?

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y185/Crotklauberi/CIMG0039.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y185/Crotklauberi/CIMG0040.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y185/Crotklauberi/CIMG0041.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y185/Crotklauberi/CIMG0054.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y185/Crotklauberi/CIMG0055.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y185/Crotklauberi/CIMG0056.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y185/Crotklauberi/CIMG0059.jpg

-Brandon-

Flintknapper
January 18, 2011, 12:55 AM
Brandon Wrote:

Pics from Arizona. I dont know if anyone on here has experience hunting them out here...they are not nearly as abundant and seem to be very localized around permanent water.
Hi Brandon,

No matter where you find Feral Hogs, their basic needs are the same:

Food, Water, Shelter from the elements.

If sources for water are limited in that area, then... you can use that to your advantage. Concentrate your efforts around the water.


This spot is a ways out in the wilderness.
Do you have unfettered access to it? Is it private or public land?


seems like baiting is going to have to be the way to get them.
Possibly. Depends on what kind of food sources are in the area and how often you can keep it baited.

How fast do pigs usually respond to bait?
If by "respond"...you mean (how fast will they find it), it can vary.

I have had pigs find a bait site literally overnight, but more often it is some number of days before they find it.

They will begin to feed on the bait immediately (once found), and usually continue to do so... (if undisturbed/bait is sufficient).

how long will say 50 pounds of buried corn and spread around last?
Not long....if you have a group of hogs. If they have free access to the bait (no action taken to meter the amount) they can easily clean up 50 lbs. in one visit.

The key to keeping hogs coming to a bait site is: A regular (daily) source of something palatable (read corn). You do NOT have to put out a truck load, it just needs to be there each day.

If you can not set up a feeder/pig pipe/post holes... to make the corn last longer, then broadcast it over a large area (100 ft. circle). That will serve to make them hunt for it.

If your plan is to put out corn (free access) and then return a week later to hunt, I would not expect any success. Birds and other animals (along with the hogs) will quickly pick it up.

If you can provide a little more information, we might be able to help you devise a strategy for your situation.

Good luck Sir,

Flint.

Ruark
January 18, 2011, 11:33 AM
I think one thing people don't realize is that you will NOT get rid of feral hogs with guns, dogs, helicopters or any kind of shooting or hunting activity. A Texas wildlife biologist wrote last year that just to keep a population of hogs level, you would have to kill 70% of the population per year. So if there are 1,000 hogs in a given area, you would have to kill or trap 700 a year just to MAINTAIN that population. It's NOT going to happen.

The only way to really impact hog populations is poisoning, which is illegal in Texas. You can certainly understand the concern; we've all heard the stories of people putting out highly toxic poisons and killing every whitetail deer in the county, along with the hogs. But they should allow responsible, controlled poisoning. They should allow using some small amount of bait that you could stay near and monitor, then retrieve it after it's eaten, something of that nature. But I think in banning ANY poisoning of ANY kind or method, they threw the baby out with the bathwater. Nothing else is going to work.

Moderator note: Best not to speak of a dangerous methodology, given that it could be attempted by the incompetent or irresponsible.

CrotKlauberi
January 18, 2011, 01:51 PM
Flint,

The land is open to public access. Its a pretty small area where the real heavy sign is...I would say less than a miles worth of the wash system. I was thinking that the Tubes filled with corn would be the best way, how long will that system last as I can only make it up to bait maybe once or twice a week. I have weekends off so I can hunt for 2 days back to back. Im sure that they have been hunted before as they seem to be very skidish. Im not really sure what to do as this is not a very common hunt out here in AZ so im just trying to come up with a plan that fits my time constraints.

-Brandon-

Flintknapper
January 20, 2011, 07:12 PM
delete duplicate

Flintknapper
January 20, 2011, 07:14 PM
Brandon, baiting with "pig pipes" or setting up feeding tubes... sounds like your best bet, I agree.

How long they will last is anyone's guess. Visitation to the bait site by hogs and raccoons will determine that, but in any case...it remains your best shot at attracting and holding hogs in the area until you can go back.

If you have a game camera and can set it up (inconspicuously), you'd have a good idea of how many hogs you were dealing with and when they are coming in.

If they are coming in only at night and your State does not allow hunting them under those conditions, then you'd just be wasting your time (except for the fun of being out there).

Kentuckiana rifleman
January 25, 2011, 01:53 AM
Does anybody have this problem near the Austin area?

Deaf Smith
January 28, 2011, 11:08 PM
I'm very impressed with this thread.

My brother-in-law lives near Laneville Texas, and having nearly 400+ acres of land he to is quite pestered with wild hogs.

But look on the bright side gents!!!

IF THERE IS A DEPRESSION THOSE HOGS WILL COME IN HANDY!

I hope it don't happen but it might! And that's my 'hope and change'.

Deaf

sixgunner455
January 29, 2011, 12:20 AM
Pics from Arizona. I dont know if anyone on here has experience hunting them out here...they are not nearly as abundant and seem to be very localized around permanent water. This spot is a ways out in the wilderness. I saw 3 pigs (or asses of pigs) when i hiked through the canyon but it seems like baiting is going to have to be the way to get them.

How fast do pigs usually respond to bait?

how long will say 50 pounds of buried corn and spread around last?

any suggestions?


I suggest that you be careful. In AZ, we have a lot more javelina than true pigs, and the javelina are a protected game species with seasons and you have to draw out for a tag to hunt them. If you kill javelina out of season and without a tag, and get caught, you will not be happy.

FYI, I do not see hogs on the AZ Game and Fish website, so ... I wonder if we really have any of them to speak of. I've hunted in southern AZ for years, and while I see javelina regularly, I've never seen a hog here outside of a pig farm.

Flint - this is a great thread. I've enjoyed it, and am very impressed with your bows and stone work.

MattTheHat
February 3, 2011, 06:22 PM
Hey Flint,

We're having a real cold snap up here in northeast Texas. It's been getting down as low as 10 degrees at my place in the country. How the heck do the hogs survive that? I assume they just bed down as they normally would (not like they're going to break out the electric blankets). Is it just a matter of thick hide and plenty of fat? I also assume they don't wander around as much when it gets this cold, but never thought much about how the cold affects them.

I haven't been up to the farm for a few weeks until last weekend. The filthy critters have really rooted up several areas pretty badly. In one area they'd rooted up nearly an acre of land and it appears they bedded down in the area once they were done rooting through it. Lots of round depressions in the torn up ground about a foot deep, and say, 2 feet in diameter. Probably a couple dozen of those depressions in various sizes.

Just trying to figure out what the nasty critters are up to and where. I've got about 500 acres and there's plenty of areas that have been rooted up, plenty of wallows and other signs, but I rarely see them, even at night. I know poachers have been hunting them off and on over the past couple of years until we posted some signs and secured the gates a little better. I've got a buddy or two who hunt them from time to time. I'm sure they realize they're better off when humans don't see them.


-Matt

Flintknapper
February 3, 2011, 06:51 PM
Hi Matt,

Yes, the hogs can tolerate extreme weather for short periods of time (several days), before they begin to suffer from it.

The average Feral Hog in Texas is not equipped for extremely cold weather (as are Russian Boar or other European pigs), but they can survive by finding places to get out of the wind, bedding down and riding it out.

Depending upon the terrain and severity of weather, the results might range from a minor nuisance, to mild stress for the hogs. They are pretty hardy animals.

Look for an explosion of movement once the weather clears and temperatures swing back toward normal wintertime lows.

Wind and rain seem to send them scurrying for cover...more than just low temps.

Good luck with them.

Flint.

MattTheHat
February 13, 2011, 09:41 AM
My "hog gun" arrived yesterday. A fellow here was re-homing his .450 Bushmaster, and I simply couldn't resist. :)


-Matt

Flintknapper
February 13, 2011, 05:04 PM
Excellent Matt!

The "Bushy" will make a fine big bore hog gun!

If you reload for it... you can take .458 caliber bullets and swage them down for use in the Bushy. You get much more bullet selection that way.

Silverado6x6
February 14, 2011, 12:40 AM
Wow what a thread, its like reading a novel! First time I paid attention to it and I have been a lurker here for years. I noticed you liked using the Barnes, its all I buy and reload, I even have a load for my .45auto using the Barnes Tactical M/LE 185gr using 7.7 grains of Longshot. Its only .7gr more than the Barnes MAX load of the .45auto. Technically its a +P and is what I feel very close to duplicating the same bullet in the Corbon DPX.

For my .308 I load the Barnes Triple Shocks in 150gr. Cabelas sells a green laser powered long range spotlight, comes in 30,40 and 50mm sizes for out to I believe 600 yards. I have plans to have one in the future.

I might go with the .450 Bushmaster as well on one of my AR's but what I want for now is to set up my M1A for wolf control up here in Alaska. We have had villages terrorized by packs of them.

I'm glad we don't have wild pig problems up here and even if for some odd chance some were even introduced I doubt they would make it through the first winter.

Did you hear about some yahoos that had several Benelli auto shotguns wired into a remote video camera? I think it was somewhere in the SE.

I think I know your area, I used to live in Carthage TX, never had any time to hunt as I was a drilling rig mechanic there around 1984. But I also don't miss the summer heat and humidity as well, I'm totally cold blooded acclimated now!;)

If you need advice about setting up any LED lights don't hesitate to ask, I use to have a business making LED lights ten years ago, now I gunsmith, reload and fabricate.

PS: Sorry about all that cold weather down your way, I think it got lost looking for Alaska this year.:D

HarcyPervin
February 24, 2011, 05:27 PM
I don't know if I'm speaking for everybody here, but this thread is a great read! Can't wait for updates flint! Keep up the good work, and if you see long haired pigs, shoot them first, lets keep em out of the cold and out of MN!

Flintknapper
February 24, 2011, 07:01 PM
"Long Haired" pigs it is! Makes no difference to me. :D

Coincidentally, I just got back from looking at a pasture on the NW part of the ranch. Lots of new pot holes (rootings), so I'm going to have to get out there and see whats going on.

From the looks of it, I'd say a single Boar (probably long haired). ;)


Flint.

chbrow10
February 28, 2011, 10:02 PM
The local Wildlife Management Area is full of hogs, but will only let you use a .22LR or bow (arrowhead must be "without points") unless it is deer season. The wardens say that a 22LR shot to the ear will kill a hog, I guess that is a brain shot..?

You can't use a tree stand either, nor a ground blind. And no nighttime hunting or baiting. So you basically are stalking.

There is lots of hog sign, but with all these restrictions, is it worth my time?

jjjjeremy
February 28, 2011, 10:38 PM
Don't use a .22. It's just inhumane. I thought Flint posted here about what happens when you shoot a pig with a .22, but I might be wrong. It's pretty disgusting.

Can you find the post, Flint?

swampboss
February 28, 2011, 10:55 PM
Don't use a .22. It's just inhumane. I thought Flint posted here about what happens when you shoot a pig with a .22, but I might be wrong. It's pretty disgusting.

Can you find the post, Flint?
The 22 is not usually the weapon of choice, but will do the job if you make head shots( base of the ear ) under 80 yards. Ive killed dozens.... only because that was the gun in my hands at the time.

jjjjeremy
February 28, 2011, 11:38 PM
I don't doubt that the shot can be made, I just don't think that I would take it.

DammitBoy
February 28, 2011, 11:45 PM
We kill them all the time with .22's out here. Not my preference, but it can do the job.

Flintknapper
February 28, 2011, 11:58 PM
jjjjeremy wrote:


Don't use a .22. It's just inhumane. I thought Flint posted here about what happens when you shoot a pig with a .22, but I might be wrong. It's pretty disgusting.

Can you find the post, Flint

I don't recall ever having said "don't use a .22 rimfire" (or any other cartridge). I have killed many, many.... hogs with a .22 (under controlled conditions/in a trap).

I DO suggest that each person know the limitations of their firearm...then use it accordingly.

Yes, I have found .22 bullets in hogs that I have killed, but I have also found large bullet fragments, birdshot and even one broadhead.

If you use a .22 rimfire (even the .22 magnum), a CNS (Central Nervous System) shot is desirable. When dispatching hogs captured in a trap...this is easily done (by being patient and picking your shot).

Under field conditions...the same shot opportunity can be more difficult to get. As much as I loath Feral Hogs....my personal ethics dictate I pass on any shot that has a high probability of wounding. I am similarly bound when choosing a weapon to use.

I will not use a .22 rimfire under field conditions, but I do not hold others to that same standard.

For longer precision shots....I use a 7mm-08 and am mindful of shot angles.

When I don't want to worry about shot angles, I drag out the .458 SOCOM. ;)

DammitBoy
March 1, 2011, 10:09 AM
Flint, what is your opinion of the .450 bushmaster?

Flintknapper
March 1, 2011, 10:31 AM
DammitBoy wrote:


Flint, what is your opinion of the .450 bushmaster?

I'll assume the question is in the form of: As for a hog gun.

In which case...I would rate it excellent. Factory ammo for it...(presently) is somewhat limited in terms of choice. If you hand-load....your choices are much greater. Even so...most bullets for it are .451-.452 pistol bullets, so choose carefully.

IF you hand-load...a way to increase your bullet selection is to take any of the .458 caliber rifle bullets (tons of them) and swage them down to use in your Bushmaster. Some of the Bushy guys have been doing this for awhile.

Its a couple of extra steps....but worth it.

Any of the three (popular) big bores...built on an AR platform (450 Bushmaster, 50 Beowulf, .458 SOCOM) will put hogs down with authority, but they are limited by trajectory as to the practical ranges you should use them for (generally under 200 yds.)

jjjjeremy
March 1, 2011, 05:50 PM
Flint,

I wasn't trying to put words in your mouth. I was just looking for the post with the cyst, to show what can go wrong if the shot isn't placed properly.

If one is confident that the humane .22 shot can be made, take it. I don't think that I've ever been confident enough (or brave enough) to take the shot.

Flintknapper
March 1, 2011, 07:36 PM
Jeremy,

I think you'll find the pics in the thread below:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=572323&highlight=hog+shield

Should be on the second page...but read the entire thread, pretty interesting IMO.

jjjjeremy
March 1, 2011, 07:38 PM
That's it! Thanks!

Flintknapper
March 1, 2011, 08:40 PM
^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Da Nada!

Hope you weren't eating though, those are pretty nasty pics. (puking smiley)

Screamin'Eagle
March 2, 2011, 03:51 PM
Hope you weren't eating though, those are pretty nasty pics.

In the picture of the .22 bullet that's still intact you get focused detail on that stuff and that's when my stomach almost turned! UGH!

tarosean
March 2, 2011, 06:10 PM
great read

Im lucky enough to have none on my property... yet have helped a number of farmers in my area with eradication. They are a serious PITA!

chbrow10
March 2, 2011, 09:24 PM
Does the behavoir of the hog change in the rain or a thunderstorm? I am trying to go hog hunting Saturday and it is scheduled to rain. If the animal's behavoir doesn't change, then maybe the rain will help hide our scent and noise?

Flintknapper
March 2, 2011, 09:52 PM
chbrow10 wrote:

Does the behavoir of the hog change in the rain or a thunderstorm? I am trying to go hog hunting Saturday and it is scheduled to rain.
Light rain or intermittent rain, no...not much effect on their patterns.

Thunderstorm/heavy rain is another story. Hogs tend to "hole up" until bad weather has passed. But...prior to bad weather (and again when it clears off), you might actually see increased movement/activity.


If the animal's behavoir doesn't change, then maybe the rain will help hide our scent and noise?
Yes, rain tends to carry air borne scent to the ground and also mask noise (to some extent).

Just the same....try to stay downwind of any area you expect to see hogs, they have the best nose in the business!

Best of luck to you. Post pics of any success.

Flint.

NOLAEMT
March 3, 2011, 01:23 AM
now that bullets for the 460 S&W are available, i would think they would make excellent 450 bushmaster projectiles, the velocities are about the same.

HelterSkelter
March 5, 2011, 03:54 AM
get yourself a m18 claymore mine and hide it in a pile of corn. problem solved.

SSG B
March 8, 2011, 01:24 PM
An M19 automatic grenade launcher would be WAY more fun!

SSG B
March 8, 2011, 01:31 PM
Mr. Flintknapper

I never did make the trip down south this fall/winter as hoped. It will still happen, just not this year. It did allow me the opportunity to mount a quad rail on my DMPS .308.

I wanted to mention again that this is still the best thread I have read. It is very imformative, entertaining, and just plain awesome!

Do you have a "day job" as well? Or where do you find the time to make bows and arrows, reload powder actuated projectiles, and deliver an education to the folks on THR as well? :confused:

Flintknapper
March 8, 2011, 08:39 PM
Everyone has the same 24 hrs. in a day, its all a matter of what you do with them. ;) :D

WALKERs210
March 15, 2011, 12:54 AM
Flintknapper, thanks so much for your posting here on the subject of Wild Hogs. In Alabama or at least in my area we never had this much of a problem. Well I thought we didn't, last few weeks I started noticing tracks that looked like one or two deer roaming close to the house. But after closer examining it looks more like Piggies are here. I walked to the back of my property and more and more tracks everywhere, health as it is I didn't venture out into the wooded area to see if and what is going on there. My son had buried a dog several months ago and something had dug it up and scattered the bones all over. Don't know if a hog would do that or not so thought I'd ask someone with more experience. Going out tomorrow for a Game Camera to see what turns up

DammitBoy
March 15, 2011, 02:31 AM
Walker - that's hogs alright.

I hunt hogs all the time around Butler, AL and the hogs are as thick as ticks round there.

Flintknapper
March 15, 2011, 07:47 AM
Hi Walker,

Yes...hogs will root up carcasses....but coyotes will also dig things up.

Based only on that information...I am not ready to say you have hogs.

However, a "game-cam" and perhaps putting out a bit of corn....would be an excellent idea. So you are on the right track (no pun intended).

WALKERs210
March 15, 2011, 09:54 AM
Coyotes have been in area before but luckily they are moving out. I did think that it could have been Coyotes at first until all the tracks around premiter , and the depth of prints. For a long time we had a heard of white tails that would litterly come to the back door and eat the flowers from garden. One really nice buck but he never came into the open area. I should have picked up that something was outside sooner, but when you get old you start overlooking and forgetting things to look for. Anyway tonight will have a game camera in place just to see what we can see. thanks

DammitBoy
March 15, 2011, 01:05 PM
What part of Alabama Walkers210? Game management in your area ought to know about a pig problem.

Harley Quinn
March 15, 2011, 02:21 PM
Hogs leave tracks, and so do Coyotes:) Not easily confused:what:

Baiting the location is a good idea...:)

Anyway tonight will have a game camera in place just to see what we can see. thanks

Looking forward to your find;)

WALKERs210
March 15, 2011, 02:55 PM
DammitBoy I am in WALKER county, tried to talk with the Wildlife management dept this morning. Don't know who pissed in there cheerios but they were of no help what so ever. Woman just plainly said, legal to kill them on "YOUR PROPERTY" during daylight hours only and trapping them is illegal. Basically I can kill them or ignore them.

tazbigdog
March 16, 2011, 09:23 PM
Flintknapper,

Thank you so much for your informative and graphic depiction of your hog problem. I sat down here for the last 2 hours and read the 27 pages of it. I can certainly get a sense of the destructiveness of these feral hogs and the tenacity of the species to reproduce.

I applaud your efforts and humanity of not turning this into a pig fest. I learned alot from you and your methods.

Keep up the good work.

Jeff

kcmarine
March 26, 2011, 11:21 PM
Would an 7.62x39mm Saiga work for that kind of work? I've got a bunch of ammo and no job over the summer lined up... and need a reason to justify my firearms purchases...so... if anyone needs someone to come in over the summer to help clear it out, I'd be interested. Pay would be even better, if there are those opportunities out there.

Admittedly, I've never done it before, but hey, it's worth a shot... literally.

Glockhead
March 27, 2011, 10:06 PM
It seems like poisons would be pretty effective to eliminate hogs if the delivery system was designed to weed out the smaller critters.

kcmarine
March 28, 2011, 03:56 PM
Poisons aren't as... targetable. The hogs will eat it, and so will the deer and turkeys and everything else. That's the big problem.

Cob
April 11, 2011, 05:51 PM
I started reading this string, but did not finish it...if it's already been posted, forgive me... when you set the trap, build a small pen on the back side of it, and keep a couple live hogs fed and watered inside the pen as part of the trap set-up... results will increase capture rate.
if duplicate, forgive the repost... it's important

hirundo82
April 11, 2011, 10:43 PM
when you set the trap, build a small pen on the back side of it, and keep a couple live hogs fed and watered inside the pen as part of the trap set-up

The "Judas sow" technique was mentioned early in the thread (http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=5673009&postcount=70)

Hard to believe this thread has been going for almost two years. Don't think I've posted in this thread before, but I've really enjoyed following it. Keep up the good work, Flintknapper.

Flintknapper
April 13, 2011, 09:42 PM
hirundo82 wrote:

Hard to believe this thread has been going for almost two years. Don't think I've posted in this thread before, but I've really enjoyed following it.

Yes, administration/mods have been gracious to make it a sticky and to leave it up this long. I hope it will continue, only because the information here might help someone else with what is a growing problem in many states (Feral Hogs).

I have pointed quite a few people to this thread and I see (currently) it has about 125,000 "hits", so someone is at least looking at it.

I haven't had much time this year to mount an assault on the hogs...but I promise...I will get back after them as soon as I can.

I will try to find time to add some more information here soon. I realize some folks read this thread only for the stories and there is nothing wrong with that. I like to read the stories of others and live vicariously through them, its fun, but that is not the real purpose of this thread.

Sharing ideas, techniques, successes and failures...all help to make us better hunters.

"Better Hunters"= More dead pigs. (a good thing IMO).

bbuddtec
April 13, 2011, 09:44 PM
Well, I just recently found this post and spent the last few days chipping at it when time allowed...

Flint, you are a model American.

Your bow and arrow work are priceless.

A hunter of the highest degree.

Gifted writer.

Great teacher.

That being said, I dig your SOCOM, your attitude, and your style!

ROCK ON!


PS- IH8HOGS!!! <----

IllHunter
May 6, 2011, 12:55 AM
inside information from shipmates on Vinson, (posted here as a new use for those feral, infernal porcine pests) after OBL was waxed by ST6, he was prepped for burial and placed inside a body bag. After dumping garbage astern for 30 minutes, OBL's bag was weighted with 16 frozen hams and the slide board was greased with bacon. When the bastard hit the waves, sharks were seen choosing the hams.:D

Art Eatman
May 6, 2011, 02:03 PM
Okay, okay, I'll leave it, but no more OBL comments will survive the Delete key.

Flintknapper
May 6, 2011, 11:24 PM
^^^^^^^^^^

Yes, this really isn't the proper thread for OBL discussion.

Thanks for leaving the thread intact as well, I continue to direct folks here in hopes they might glean something from the information provided.

Much appreciated!

Flint.

mtnjrm
May 9, 2011, 12:02 PM
One of the best hog stories I have read. So good I going to read it again.

AKTexas
May 9, 2011, 06:00 PM
Simply amazing!No hogs on our place. Plenty of goats ruining our feeders. We put up fence around our feeders recently the cameras tell us it has been successful in keep them out but still allowing the deer to get to the corn.

Flintknapper
May 9, 2011, 06:40 PM
Yes, goats can be nearly as much a problem as hogs (if they are overstocked on the land). Goats tend to overgraze pasture land, then turn to other "browse" such as low hanging limbs.

Goats with long horns (especially Angora's) are constantly getting caught in fences, forks of bushes, etc....

Then...if we consider that goats are not exactly at the "top of the heap" for intelligence, its a wonder any of them survive.

I am happy to hear you don't have hogs though, I wouldn't wish them upon anyone.

Double Naught Spy
May 9, 2011, 06:54 PM
Goats are very good at being goats. The natural habitats of goats generally are not cluttered with the likes of lots of trees and wire fences, their preferences generally being to the open country, rocky, and often desert environs.

Domestication and return to being feral hasn't helped them either in the IQ department.

Lots of animals aren't very bright, but they are very good at doing what they do and as such have survived a very long time. Some just adapt better to new circumstances than others. Pigs seem to fall into that category. Armadillos and opossums do not.

AKTexas
May 9, 2011, 10:58 PM
The land we hunt is located in Del Rio just over 2k with access to a section of a 10k ranch. We have two kinds of turkeys,axis, whitetails, and any predators and varmints open for hunting. There are about 300 goats that is after they pulled over 900 of the little bastards off the place. These goats are feral for the most part and there are a few smart ones.

We had one of feeders get demolished by this smart female. She would rear up and head butt the feeder to shake corn out. She would do this over and over until the goats ate their fill or ran the feeder out. The worst part of what they did was the digging out under the feeder. They created a hole that eventually shook the feeder anchors loose.

The turkeys do not mind the goats in fact they scare them off when they fly in to eat. Forgot to mention the raccoons too. Those suckers are smartasses.

Here are some pics I took of some of the wildlife on the lease plus some from the game cameras.

http://i803.photobucket.com/albums/yy315/AKTexas1973/Deer%20Lease/PICT0026.jpg

http://i803.photobucket.com/albums/yy315/AKTexas1973/Deer%20Lease/PICT0255.jpg

http://i803.photobucket.com/albums/yy315/AKTexas1973/Deer%20Lease/PICT0202.jpg

http://i803.photobucket.com/albums/yy315/AKTexas1973/Deer%20Lease/100_0552.jpg

http://i803.photobucket.com/albums/yy315/AKTexas1973/Deer%20Lease/100_0518.jpg

http://i803.photobucket.com/albums/yy315/AKTexas1973/Deer%20Lease/100_0403.jpg

http://i803.photobucket.com/albums/yy315/AKTexas1973/Deer%20Lease/100_0400.jpg

http://i803.photobucket.com/albums/yy315/AKTexas1973/Deer%20Lease/100_0498.jpg

http://i803.photobucket.com/albums/yy315/AKTexas1973/Deer%20Lease/100_0485.jpg

http://i803.photobucket.com/albums/yy315/AKTexas1973/Deer%20Lease/100_0418.jpg

spyder882001
May 10, 2011, 03:13 AM
Flint, excellent thread just read the whole thing. Good luck with your Hogs and great job with the arrow heads, I hope mine look that nice one day. Just recently moved to Southeast Texas and am hoping to help put a dent in the piggie population.

tommyintx
May 27, 2011, 08:10 AM
Flint, how do you feel about this drought we are having? How is it affecting your hog problems? I STILL have not done any maintenance to unused pastures damaged from the hogs last year. Too busy with other things, but i have seen no fresh damage. The trinity is down VERY low, and the property I am on, which borders Clayton Bayou (In liberty, texas), is DRY. Clayton bayou which normally is a pretty good little catfish/crawfish hole, is solid mud. There is no water left, and i can't even get through it with a Longtail mud motor. Only way i was able to get through it last weekend was a friend's air boat. Do you think they're moving north towards you/lake livingston? Since there is no water source here? Our ponds are just solid dirt now..

Also, how'd you like that storm the other night? We got baseball sized hail down here.

Flintknapper
May 27, 2011, 10:02 PM
Hi Tommy,

Good to hear from you.

Drought conditions will cause hogs to move (seeking water) if it severe or long lasting. The conditions you describe (mud holes) will definitely put hogs in search of a reasonable water source.

Hogs depend on water for so much more than just drinking.

Our ponds are getting low...but I still have hog sign around them. Just haven't had time to get out and kill any of them. :(

That storm system...was wicked, lots of damage for a lot of folks, fortunately it missed us.

Take care Tommy,

Flint.

CathieC
May 28, 2011, 05:44 PM
Last night my husband and I pulled into the drive and our headlights scanned the front pasture.... where we saw at least 12 hogs. We have seen increasing signs they were around, but we had never seen them. I googled this afternoon and have been totally enthralled by your thread! So informative! So well written! And... entertaining as well. Just want to say thank you!

Flintknapper
May 29, 2011, 01:38 AM
Sorry to hear you have hogs Cathie.

Welcome to the forum. I have relatives in Pollock and live a bit outside of "Nac" myself, so we probably share the same hogs. ;) :D Maybe that didn't come out quite right (I mean the animals).


Flint.

tommyintx
June 22, 2011, 08:25 PM
well we've had rain the past two days in a row, flint. maybe this drought is finally over. about how soon you 'figger 'till i see some activity?

Or do you think the rain won't have enough effect?

like i said a while back, i haven't seen any hogs in a long time now.. and since that last post, i still haven't seen any.

Flintknapper
June 23, 2011, 12:27 AM
Tommy... I think the drought conditions are pretty much the trend right now.

We got some much needed rain as well....but hog activity around here has been very limited. It has been wicked hot and dry. They are not moving any more than have to...in order to survive (at least around here).

I have noticed in years past that the bulk of the hogs will move from our property (dotted with farm ponds) to the River Bottom (about 2 miles away) when we have an extended drought.

The overall condition there is just better and sows still have piglets/shoats to provide for.

Not to worry though, they'll be back, they always come back! :banghead:

Nimrod2
June 23, 2011, 09:25 AM
Flint: I am glad to see that you guys got some rain. Last Sunday I was traveling from Dallas to Houston when they shut down I-45 at Madisonville due to the wildfires. After wading through a massive traffic jam, I got to see some nice east Texas countryside. I hope you guys got enough rain to help with the wildfires.
The hog situation in Louisiana is so bad that the governor signed a bill last week to allow hog hunting with suppressed rifles. I will be looking into that idea since it would seem to be a big help with night hunting. I would think it would allow additional shots into a sounder before they can scatter.
Have really been enjoying this thread. Good luck when the hogs return.

tx_packmule
June 23, 2011, 04:18 PM
The drought is changing their usual routines, but after the recent rains they are sure to target a few pastures.

bdickens409
June 24, 2011, 01:17 PM
Flint thanks so much the very cool thread, I also live in East Texas on about 50 acre farm with 220 more leased from the timber company adjoining us. The hogs around us come and go. It seems that they show up for 1-2 weeks then gone for 6 months or so. Is this normal? I do a lot of reading on THR but almost never post but I had to let you and the staff of THR know much I like this thread. They should put you on the payroll. I have learned so much from you and THR in general.

Flintknapper
June 24, 2011, 07:20 PM
bdickens409 wrote:

Flint thanks so much the very cool thread, I also live in East Texas on about 50 acre farm with 220 more leased from the timber company adjoining us. The hogs around us come and go. It seems that they show up for 1-2 weeks then gone for 6 months or so. Is this normal?

Hi BD,

Welcome to the forum and thanks for your participation.

In regards to your question, yes...Feral Hogs are known to be quite transient. So... even on large parcels of land (with good habitat) it is not unusual to see them relocate from time to time.

On smaller pieces of property (such as yours) ...the tendency for them to 'move around' seems to be more frequent simply by virtue of boundaries.

The hogs probably move onto neighboring land and might not really go all that far (1-2 miles).

Of course, all of this assumes there is suitable habitat for them and no other influences such as heavy hunting pressure. Hogs can (and will) move many miles to escape human pressure or when seeking out better conditions.

It is just impossible to keep up with them on small parcels of land....except to put out game-cams...which allow you to pattern them when they ARE there.

Good luck with yours. ANY... that you can take off of your property helps the overall situation.

Flint.

deanp100
June 28, 2011, 07:33 AM
Hi Flint, Just read this from beginning to end. Great read. Very interesting the differences between pig hunting in Australia and Texas. Same problem, different techniques. Your pigs on a whole tend to be in better condition but that may relate to your local conditions. I found it interesting that people spend weeks hunting on 120 acre properties. We couldn't feed 2 sheep of 120 acres in a lot of the hard pig country and properties need to be 120 000 acres to survive. We have a thriving export industry in wild pig to germany and hunting pressure in some areas is extreme. We tend not to see the same pigs all that often and there is lots of spotighting done over crop paddocks. Dogs are used a lot and lots of trapping by the professionals. And absolutely no AR based weapons which is a crying shame. The hunting days of the 80's has largely stopped where you just shot everything and properties welocmed you with open arms. These days a lot of properties let the pro hunters have the run of the place and keep the amateurs out. Too many idiots or incompetents.
cheers
Deano

AKElroy
June 29, 2011, 07:09 PM
Even with this extreme drought, we are not seeing a reduction in the hogs on our San Saba county lease. I am training the youngster to have a healthy desire to render them immobile, however!! He is not quite old enough to swing that 94, but next year he likely will have his opportunity.

nortexeric
July 1, 2011, 01:34 PM
Flintknapper,

I just recently joined this forum and stumbled upon this gem right off the bat. What an outstanding read! Thank you for your time and effort providing this info. A few friends and I are trying to take care of our local hog problem. One is on 270 acres and the other is on 500+. After reading this, I believe I have a better understanding of what we are going up against and what we need to do to be more efficient in this task. Should I have any questions, I know who I'm going to ask.

-Eric

tommyintx
July 3, 2011, 04:20 AM
Welcome to THR nortexeric!

You've come to the right place for hog hunting intel.

Hope to see you around in the future.


Hey AKTexas, just now noticed your post and pictures.
I hunt out of dryden on a 30k acre ranch lease. Some great pictures you have there.
I've seen pretty much all that, including coyotes and javelinas too, but no turkeys. Is there anything your doing to attract them to the property? I've been on this lease for two years now, but i haven't seen any turkeys yet, and I've never been able to take one, and would like to this year.
Thanks,
Tommy

nortexeric
July 5, 2011, 08:12 AM
Thanks Tommy!

Well, I went out to gather more intel on the group of hogs on my buddy's property Sunday night, and it seem they have relocated. As mentioned earlier by someone else, my guess would be due to water. The creek has pretty much dried up, and the pond is starting to really take a hit.

On another note though, we were able to observe 2 bucks, and 3 doe as they grazed the edge of a field about 200m from our position. It was pretty cool just to watch them, but sadly Grayson County is still bow only, so even when season does come around, we won't be hunting those particular deer. This does however make me realize I need to bring a camera with me.

-Eric

Flintknapper
July 24, 2011, 01:05 PM
Really frustrating hog!

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/hog7-24-11.jpg

Not even a big hog, but very cautious. I’ve been trying to bait this hog up out of a wet weather creek bed for about 3 weeks now.

The banks of the creek are about 8’-10’ high most places …so it is difficult to set up a stand where you can see the hog.

This animal will eat corn right up to a trail that leads out of the creek bed, but no farther.

It doesn’t go to the Fish Pond, which has a good water supply and is only about 400 yds. away, but instead…. prefers to drink and wallow in a nasty little mud hole (see pic) in the creek bed.

Hog is definitely camera shy, I’ll get a single pic (like the one above)….always in the wee hours….then the hog doesn’t come back for two or three days. I had to mount the camera down in the creek bed about 20’ from the water/mud hole.

Even though I covered it well with brush, it stills gives off an IR signature and makes a very slight sound when the shutter trips. That’s all it takes for this hog to spook.

I went ahead and set up a stand today and put up a hog light that will shine down onto the water hole, so we’ll see if the hog will tolerate that or not. I dread having to put in an “all nighter” for a single hog (not even a big one), but the only other practical method would be to snare it. With this hog…I don’t think I could get in and out of the creek without leaving too much scent behind (thus spooking it away).

In years past….only big mature Boars….or the Alpha Sow in a sounder…were this wary, I honestly believe hogs (as a whole) are getting smarter….with respect to being hunted.

Anyway, we’ll see how it plays out, only one of three things can happen.

1. I’ll get lucky and will get a shot at the hog before it detects me. (Flint wins).

2. The hog will come in and circle downwind, detect me and slip away quietly. (Hog wins).

3. The hog will wait until about 4:00 a.m. to come in, by which time…the mosquitoes will have sucked the last drop of blood from my body. Then…when my dead, dried up carcass falls from the stand….the hog will come and eat me…in a final act of triumph! (Hog wins).


Why do I do this? :confused:

41
July 24, 2011, 01:17 PM
Is that the only hog that you are getting pictures of right now?

SciFiJim
July 24, 2011, 01:56 PM
Flintknapper,
As the incautious hogs are hunted out, the wild hogs are being selectively bred for intelligence and caution. Only the smart ones survive.

Flintknapper
July 24, 2011, 02:26 PM
SciFiJim wrote:


Flintknapper,
As the incautious hogs are hunted out, the wild hogs are being selectively bred for intelligence and caution. Only the smart ones survive.

No question about it Jim.

In fact, I hold that to be the primary reason we don't often see what is known around here as a "Piney Woods Rooter". Not that it is a different species (ALL feral hogs are genetically the same), but the Feral Hogs we see now... do have a slightly different physical appearance, but more importantly...they RUN (if given a chance)!

The old PWR's would just as soon stand and fight as run away. As a consequence...they are few(er) in number now. Largely replaced with a Feral Hog that is ever learning and becoming a better survivalist than it's predecessor.

mod60rimfire
July 24, 2011, 02:31 PM
I would give anything to go inna woods with my saiga rifle and hunt pigs all day.
damn IL!

Nimrod2
July 24, 2011, 09:25 PM
Flint, you are starting to get me a little concerned. You seem to be insinuating that a new "super" pig is emerging in East Texas.
Dare I even think that this new pig may be "Flint proof"?
No...NO...that is not possible. We (your fans) expect you to get out there and uphold truth, justice, and the American way.
Now quit whining about the skeeters and go get that pig! ;)

Flintknapper
July 25, 2011, 06:20 AM
Nimrod2 wrote:

Ain't no Kryptonite in East Texas!
Dat True!


Flint, you are starting to get me a little concerned. You seem to be insinuating that a new "super" pig is emerging in East Texas.

No...not super pigs (yet)...but they do seem to be adjusting to efforts made to exterminate them.

Dare I even think that this new pig may be "Flint proof"?
Perish the thought! However...I concede that some of these pigs are certainly worthy adversaries.


Now quit whining about the skeeters and go get that pig
Yeah...you're right, I guess I'm getting to be a bit of a Nancy now that I am almost 60. :(

I'll keep an eye on this hog, as soon as the wind is right for the stand I put up...I'll go have a crack at him.

Flintknapper
July 25, 2011, 07:43 AM
Well….the good news is the hog didn’t seem bothered by the Hog Light I set up and he stayed in the area for about 30 minutes last night.

Bad news is.... he continues to come in about 3-4 a.m. each time. Normally, when I get a hog (or group of hogs) interested in eating the corn (put out daily)…they almost always start coming in earlier to get it.

Not this guy! Oh well……..at least he’s “punctual”. :rolleyes:


http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Hog-7-25-11-a.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Hog-7-25-11-b.jpg

308win
July 25, 2011, 08:04 AM
Flintknapper - Perhaps you should do everything you can to leave scent, sign, etc. in the waterhole he is using and move him out of his comfort area so you have a chance to take him out in circumstances in which he isn't as comfortable or illusive.

Worst case might be the neighbors will inherit him for a while.

Flintknapper
July 25, 2011, 09:04 AM
Hi 308,

I am not against trying something unconventional when it comes to hunting hogs, but generally speaking "comfortable" is precisely what you want a hog to be. That's when they are most vulnerable.

I haven't yet attempted to kill this hog....been biding my time trying to get him to enter an area more favorable to me.

It is apparent...he's not going to "play nice" so I went ahead and set up a stand that allows me a view of the water hole he frequents. Its not ideal because the terrain slopes steeply down to the creek bed.

The reason that is bad...is that once the air temperature cools at night (read early morning), that cooler air settles and creates a thermal that flows right down to the area he is feeding in. That makes it hard to avoid being "scented". Good for him, bad for me.

If I can get him to come up out of the creek bed, then I can back off a hundred yards and better control the situation.

This dilemma would seem to support your suggested strategy, but it would force me to find the hog again and re-pattern him. If I only manage to move him off of my property, then regrettably, I have done my neighbor a disservice and there is really no point in us "swapping hogs".

This is a young boar...probably looking to establish some small amount of territory he can call his own. A larger more mature boar...would have already moved on...looking for sows.

Hopefully, I'll soon get a night where we have a Southerly wind, that will allow me to sit on the stand without much danger of being scented (unless he circles downwind before coming in).

We'll see. I don't get them ALL, but I get most of them.

mrbro
July 27, 2011, 09:28 PM
I am not a hunter, but this thread has made me more interested in hunting than anything I've ever read. Not because of the abundance of game, or the unending open season. But for the method being used by Flint. The study of the animals habits and the stalking of the animals based on these habits, the adaptation required when the animal changes it's habits, it all appeals to me on an intellectual level. It is a constantly changing challenge that requires some intelligence to win. Combine that with the fact that these animals are a plague on the local environment and it becomes a battle with a foe that is often underestimated. It really is a war against an alien invader.

Bravo Flintknapper.

Nimrod2
July 28, 2011, 12:58 PM
" It is a constantly changing challenge that requires some intelligence to win. Combine that with the fact that these animals are a plague on the local environment and it becomes a battle with a foe that is often underestimated. It really is a war against an alien invader."

I have been a hunter of other game for many years but I never understood the challenge of hog hunting until I read Flint's thread. He has really opened my eyes.
I am not alone. I read somewhere that hog hunting is one of the fastest growing sports- at least in the south. You know it is getting more popular when chain stores such as Academy start stocking items for nighttime hunting such as the LED lights with solar chargers.

Flintknapper
July 29, 2011, 08:19 AM
Hog is slowly “backing up” the time at which he comes in (much earlier now), note the dates and times.

Pretty much on his normal schedule here:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Hog-7-26-11b.jpg

About 3 hours earlier in this pic:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Hog-7-28-11-a.jpg

Less than 12 hrs. have passed since his previous visit.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Hog-7-28-11h.jpg


If the date/time in the last two pics seem confusing (date the same)…here is the explanation:

The hog came in the night of the 27th but wasn’t photographed until just after midnight (making it the 28th), then… later that same day (night), he revisited the bait site a bit after 10:00 p.m.

Something between Ten to Twelve is much more to my liking! Though there is no guarantee that he will show up early tonight (or at ALL), I plan to go sit the stand until the hog shows up, my butt goes numb or the mosquitoes kill me.

With any luck (O.K. with a lot of luck), we will be rid of this guy soon. But, you never know with hogs….especially a lone boar. They are apt to do anything.

Anyway….. my next post will either contain pics of the deceased, or will begin with the famous quote: “The best laid plans of mice and men……..” :confused:

Flintknapper
July 29, 2011, 12:31 PM
A common question (usually resulting in a wild guess) concerns the weight of a hog. I am not sure why this is important to folks...except maybe a "heavy" hog is considered more of a trophy than a smaller one.

In my years of hog hunting...I have witnessed many folks estimate the weight of a hog much higher than what it would actually weigh if put on scales. Since it is not always convenient to have a set of scales with you, a "Heart Girth Measurement" system can be used to get pretty darn close.

Below is the formula for estimating the live weight (undressed) of Feral Hogs.

Also, I have put together a remedial chart (read left to right, then drop down a column and repeat).

Pig Heart Girth Weights

Heart girth is measured in inches using a cloth measuring tape. The tape is placed directly behind the front legs, wrapped snugly around the heart girth, and read directly behind the shoulders.

Pig Weight = 10.1709 x Heart girth (inches) minus 205.7492.

Found to be 95% accurate to within 10 lbs.

Using the above formula, we get the following:

25 inches= 49 lbs. 26 inches= 59 lbs. 27 inches= 69 lbs.
28 inches= 79 lbs. 29 inches= 89 lbs. 30 inches= 99 lbs.
31 inches = 110 lbs. 32 inches= 120 lbs. 33 inches= 130 lbs.
34 inches= 140 lbs. 35 inches= 150 lbs. 36 inches= 160 lbs.
37 inches= 171 lbs. 38 inches= 181 lbs. 39 inches= 191 lbs.
40 inches = 200 lbs. 42 inches = 220 lbs. 43 inches = 230 lbs.
44 inches = 240 lbs. 45 inches = 250 lbs. 46 inches = 260 lbs.
47 inches = 270 lbs. 48 inches = 280 lbs. 49 inches = 290 lbs.
50 inches = 300 lbs. 51 inches = 310 lbs. 52 inches= 325 lbs.

55 inches needed to get approximately 350 lbs.
60 inches needed to get approximately 400 lbs.


Another way to keep this formula handy is to store it (as a note) on your cell phone.
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Pig-HG1.jpg

Then you can use the calculator function to "do the math" afield.
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Pig-HG2.jpg

A cloth tape is easily taken afield and the Heart Girth measurement can be recorded (or remembered) for later comparison to the chart.

DammitBoy
July 29, 2011, 08:58 PM
http://images.cabelas.com/is/image/cabelas/s7_420304_999_01?

We just use this. If they're over 550 lbs - we'll take them to the cotton gin and weigh them...

Flintknapper
July 30, 2011, 05:47 AM
DONE DEAL!

Pics and story later today. Have to get some sleep now.

------------------------------


Edit:

O.K. just a couple of “Quickies”……….

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/DoneDeal7.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/DoneDeal4.jpg

tazbigdog
July 30, 2011, 11:43 AM
Awesome! And the weight is...?

Flintknapper
July 30, 2011, 12:35 PM
290 even.

Flintknapper
July 30, 2011, 12:43 PM
Was doing a "Post Mortem" on the hog earlier today (also wanting to recover my bullet to check performance) and while I was at it...these two Coyote Pups came wandering out of the brush.

No doubt, they had smelled the hog and were looking for a meal. Both pups were pretty emaciated and one had been in a scuffle with something. It's wounds were fairly serious. The other pup looked fine (just thin).

I suspect something happened to the pups Mother before she could fully teach them to hunt on their own. Anyway...they were very much unafraid...but still kept about 25 feet between us. I hurried my chore and left.....so they could eat.

I have other pics (now) of the hog and can recite the events of the hunt if anyone is interested.

Coyote Pups:


http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Pair-O-Pups1.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Pair-O-Pups2.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Pair-O-Pups3.jpg

Mike1234567
July 30, 2011, 01:13 PM
I respect that you only kill what you must and leave other critters alone. Too many folks just like to kill.

Dallas Jack
July 30, 2011, 03:22 PM
Well done Flint. As to the pups I have heard that because of the drought many does are kicking their fawns out. Could this be happening with coyotes as well?
Keep up the good work.
Dallas Jack

41
July 30, 2011, 04:59 PM
and can recite the events of the hunt if anyone is interested.

I would like to hear the story when ever you get a minute to type it (I'm sure that everyone else would like to also).

Flintknapper
July 30, 2011, 11:42 PM
Decided that yesterday evening might be a good time to go and “sit” the hog stand I put along the creek bed.

The lay of the land (steep banks of creek) required that I put the stand almost parallel with the creek and only 40 yds. distance from the bait site.

As mentioned in a previous post…the location of the stand makes playing the wind (and thermals) critical. A late afternoon storm was brewing and along with it…South Easterly winds. Those conditions were advantageous on two accounts.


1. The wind direction would be blowing (slightly quartering) toward me….giving me the “downwind” advantage.

2. The cooler (than normal) air would help me reach my stand without working up a soaking sweat. I park about ¼ mile from the stand and walk in.


Got on stand about 7:30 p.m. roughly an hour before sunset. My hope was that the storm would quickly pass through (which it did) and the cooler temperature would encourage hogs to move earlier than normal.

While that may have been good strategy…. it didn’t play out that way in “real life”.


My last game-cam pics showed the hog had been coming in earlier each day (the last two sessions). I knew that by the time it got dark (after 9:00 p.m.) the storm would have passed and the winds settled, making conditions ideal.

I fully expected the hog to show up about 10 p.m. Figured I would take the shot and be back home before midnight. You know where this one is going….right?


I managed to make it to the stand without sweating, settled in and waited until dark before actually watching the area with any seriousness. I admit…..I was feeling a bit smug, the entire “set up” very much to my liking. :D


Not long after dark….the mosquitoes found me, how they do that so quickly is a mystery to me. Carbon Dioxide in your breath….I am told, but personally…I think they have perfected Social Networking because one mosquito turns into three and from there… their numbers grow exponentially. Anyway, they will take the smugness right out of you! :(



10 p.m. came and went, no hog. O.K. no big deal….its early and I still have a couple of pints of blood left.

12 midnight comes and goes, have enjoyed watching a raccoon eating the corn, but still no hog.

2 a.m. arrives and passes, no hog….but the mosquitoes have left.

3 a.m. and I am pretty sure I’ve become paralyzed from the waist down. Sitting in that hard seat has left my Gluteus Maximus and my legs mostly numb! BUT…….I think I see movement just beyond the hog light.


Sure enough…I can just make out the head of a hog slowly approaching the bait site. I turn on the lighted recticle on my scope, move my rifle up onto the rail on my stand and wait to see what the hog is going to do.


To my horror… the hog turns around and starts walking straight away (like it has decided not to come in after all), I find the hog in my scope and put the cross-hairs at the base of its tail. If this hog takes two more steps I am going to have to either let him go….or break him down and finish him with a quick follow up shot.


Thankfully….he turns around again and presents a shot quartering to me. I prefer broadside shots…but the whole reason I have a purpose built hog gun is so I can have shot angle options. The SOCOM (with proper bullets) will shoot through a hog stem to stern.

At the shot…the hog went down (CNS shot), he was dead before he hit the ground.


The movement was enough to trigger the game-cam and it recorded the event at precisely 3:00 a.m. (long night).

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/DoneDeal1.jpg

I immediately flipped on my white light, placed my laser on him and watched for movement…..but there was none.

I was able to pull the hog through the mud hole by hand…but had to use a rope and my truck to get him up out of the creek bed.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/DoneDeal3.jpg

Took a Heart Girth measurement (have been comparing for accuracy), it was 49 inches (not able to hold the tape tight and take pic at same time)

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/DoneDeal5.jpg

Hoisted the hog on analog scale (see pic in previous post) and it closely matched the formula @ 290 lbs.



Hauled the hog off this morning….for “recycling” (Buzzards and Coyotes mostly).

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/DoneDeal9.jpg



This boar had a fairly thick “shield” at the point the bullet entered, (about 1-1/2” thick). Though nowhere near as thick as some I have seen…. it was tough nonetheless.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/DoneDeal15.jpg


I won’t post pics of the wound channel or discuss bullet performance here…as I don’t think this thread is an appropriate venue for it. But…suffice to say, it was extensive.

But… no matter what you use, one thing to remember when hunting hogs is: Shot Placement is key!

countertop
July 31, 2011, 01:34 AM
Flint,

If this thread isn't appropriate, perhaps we can start a new thread for posting of wound channel pics and discussions of bullet performance.

Flintknapper
July 31, 2011, 09:28 AM
That would be fine Countertop.

I certainly don't mean that the discussion itself is inappropriate (I know you understand that). After all...this is a Hunting thread and a certain amount of carnage is to be expected.

Just saying....this particular thread is aimed primarily at exchanging "tactics" and techniques for controlling Feral Hogs and there is no need for gratuitous blood and gore.

I am happy to talk about bullet placement, performance, etc...if someone wants to start a separate thread on the subject.

Thanks!

Flint.

Mike1234567
July 31, 2011, 10:27 AM
Wow... I wish I had your focus and discipline, Flintknapper.

HarcyPervin
August 1, 2011, 05:48 PM
Still my favorite thread on this site. Entertaining and educational. I have to admit I'm throroughly impressed with how much work you've not only put into fighting this epidemic on your property, but also have taken the time to field questions to help others. I daresay that the lessons you're giving here may be directly related to many, many more hogs being nuetralized. Keep up the good work, and as always, shoot the long haired hogs first (the snow is still holding them off up here....for now)

Flintknapper
August 2, 2011, 04:40 AM
I don’t know if this subject has been discussed at any length before of not.

If so, Mods… please feel free to delete.

I have on more than one occasion ….heard folks refer to a Hogs skull as a steel vault of some sort.

Replete with many accounts of bullets failing to penetrate or “skipping off” the skull when frontal shots are taken.

I have no reason to question the accuracy of such accounts, but I don’t attribute these events to the thickness or toughness of a pig’s skull.

I believe the bulk of such happenstance can be explained by the angle at which the shot was taken (or how it ultimately impacted for any reason).

The following applies only to frontal shots. Ideally, we would like to have the projectile impact the skull as close to perpendicular as possible. See pic below.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull1.jpg

The target area should be the Brain Pan which is located roughly from the middle of the eye socket…rearward to just short of the Crest of the skull (not a large target).



As angles become shallower…. the chances of deflection (or inadequate penetration) increase.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull2.jpg

Even at the angle above…(though still good), some bullets (.22 rim-fire for example), can be redirected enough by hide and flesh … that they follow the slope of the skull instead of penetrating.

It often shows up as a “white mark or streak along the skull”. More than a few people have witnessed or experienced this.




“Worst Case Scenario” occurs when a pig lifts its head at the same time you press the trigger!

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull3.jpg

A shot that impacts at this angle has a high probability of glancing off the skull. It doesn’t mean you won’t kill the hog, but I’ve seen many hogs take a shot like that and just “shake it off”. Some will be knocked unconscious…only to get up a few seconds later.

But again, this is not because the Hogs skull is particularly hard or thick…most places, it just has to do with the shot angle. We have all seen how a bullet will skip off a body of water at shallow angles.

I think the best way to illustrate the anatomy of a hogs skull (Feral Hogs in this case) is to simply Transect and Bisect one and let you see for yourself. They are nothing like the “steel anvil” some folks claim!

See next post………

Flintknapper
August 2, 2011, 04:42 AM
Let’s start with the skull from a medium sized hog. I will transect it at several spots and show you how the skull is constructed (as viewed from the front).

When referring to any particular “area” I will use layman’s terms only (I.E. crest of skull instead of terms such as formed by the supraoccipital and parietal bones). We’ll just keep it simple. ;)

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull4.jpg



The first cut was made from what would be the end of the snout to about midway up the nasal cavity:

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull5.jpg



As viewed from the front….you can readily see there are no thick bones in this part of the skull. In fact, this area is especially fragile in its skeletal make up and only has what strength it does…owing to the tough snout, hide and connective tissues.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull6.jpg

Continued next post………

Flintknapper
August 2, 2011, 04:43 AM
The next cut was made just in front of the eye sockets. (compare to intact skull on the right).

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull7.jpg



This area gets into the Sinus Region and although there is more bone mass here, you would be hard pressed to find anything that was thicker than 3/16” (most about 1/8”). You will note that the majority of the hog’s skull is comprised of webbed/bridged openings and chambers.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull8.jpg


Continued next post…………

Flintknapper
August 2, 2011, 04:44 AM
The last transected cut was made a bit behind the eye sockets and includes a point about midway into the length of the Brain Pan.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull9.jpg



You can see in this frontal view…the Brain Pan (in the center) and the webbed areas over the B/P that help protect it.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull10.jpg



Let’s take good close look here…because I want you to note, that while there is some “distance” from the outer skull…down to the B/P, none of the bone is particularly thick.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull11.jpg


Continued next post……

Flintknapper
August 2, 2011, 04:45 AM
In order for us to have the best understanding of the skull, it is important to see it Bisected as well.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull12.jpg


We are not able to see the many chambers of the skull this way (as we could when Transected), but this view lets us look at the entire length of the skull and better shows the Brain Pan, its relatively small size and the relationship to the Sinus and Nasal cavity.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull13.jpg



And last, a closer view clearly showing…the only area with an appreciable thickness of bone is at the Crest of the skull (rear, top).

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/Skull14.jpg

I find more thickness and a hardier construction in the lower jaw (mandible) than any other place on the skull.

Hopefully, this will help someone “understand” what might have happened…. the next time a bullet fails to drop a headshot hog. Personally, I recommend taking headshots only from the side, (and only then….IF you are a good marksman and confident of your abilities).

There is much room for error when attempting a “brain shot” on a wild hog, but it can be done. A much better shot IMO… is a neck shot, (circumstance permitting).

Double Naught Spy
August 2, 2011, 07:01 AM
And last, a closer view clearly showing…the only area with an appreciable thickness of bone is at the Crest of the skull (rear, top).

Very nice!

Even the thick part is NOT composed of dense bone. The only reason you see such a buildup of bone near the rear of the skull is to provide structure supportion for the neck muscle attachment.

The Termite
August 3, 2011, 03:14 AM
This is an excellent thread. I just discovered it, and it has made the night shifts go by quicker. It's also been a very good tutorial.

Our family is also fighting a hog war on the farm. Since last October we have killed 12-14 hogs. The latest was a really big "bar"(castrated boar) that we think weighed 375-400 lbs. This estimate was based on our past experience raising hogs for slaughter, and the opinion of an elderly gentleman(89 yrs old) who has killed hundreds of deer and hogs. I wish we had known about the heart girth measurement method.
However, I have since purchased a Moultrie analog scale that goes up to 440 lbs. If that maxs out on a hog in the future, we'll just have to rely on Flintknapper's formula.

Flintknapper, our place is located west of Nacogdoches's "sister city" in Louisiana. You've heard The Legend of the Two Brothers, yes? http://wikitravel.org/en/Nacogdoches

Flintknapper
August 3, 2011, 07:33 AM
Yes, Termite.

Very familiar with the legend of how the two cities got their names.

Although it can not be substantiated 100%, the account makes sense to me and I choose to accept it as such. Beautiful and unique cities both.

I wish you good luck with your hog problem, hunt SMART...and keep after them.


Flint.

The Termite
August 3, 2011, 07:20 PM
Flint,

Your arrows are works of art. You should consider selling them at craft fairs.

PM incoming to you.

thralldad
August 4, 2011, 01:37 PM
Nac is one of my favorite towns in Tx.

Flintknapper
August 7, 2011, 04:50 PM
A couple of days ago…I went to check the water level of a small “stock tank” on my property. Normally, I don’t drive right up to this one or get out and check for hog tracks or wallows…. since I have NEVER seen evidence of hogs having visited this small water source.

The stock tank is only 200 yds. from my back door and in an open part of the pasture. Since it isn’t large, isn’t secluded and is close to my home …..it has never been attractive to Feral Hogs. However, I noticed what appeared to be a small wallow in the shallow end… and upon further inspection… concluded that at least one hog had indeed visited.

I checked the bottom strand of barb wire on a fence between pastures and found hair and mud at one particular spot. Put out a camera last night and lightly baited the area with corn where I found the fence crossing.

I dribbled out a trail of corn that would lead the hog(s) right along some utility panels that block off the levy of the stock tank. Figured I could pretty much force the hogs to walk by the camera that way.

Checked the camera this morning and saw that a small boar, a sow and 5 shoats had come in.


Boar:
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/STHogs1.jpg

Sow and shoats:
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/STHogs3.jpg

Sow and Boar (boar in back):
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/STHogs4.jpg

Shoats (2 spots, 2 black, 1 Red):
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/STHogs5.jpg

Don't know yet if these will continue to come in, but if they do...I will have formulate a plan to get rid of them. Several complications with this one.

Mike1234567
August 7, 2011, 05:11 PM
"Special complications"? Due to their proximity to your house?

Flintknapper
August 8, 2011, 12:16 AM
Yes,

Several challenges Mike, (and a few decisions to make).

The short distance from my home may (or may not)…present a problem depending upon how comfortable these hogs are with dwellings and associated noises.

The same night those game-cam pics were taken, two of my Brothers were here visiting and we were up all evening reloading cartridges.

We made no effort to be quiet and certainly made a lot of noise while walking/talking between the house and my shop. We loaded up steel targets and other items into the truck…for the next day’s shooting session and didn’t settle down back at the house until after midnight (well after the hogs had shown up). So, that is encouraging.


My hope is that THESE hogs are used to foraging in close proximity to dwellings and that normal sounds (at normal distances) simply do not alarm them. My “concern” though…is that if I leave the house to hunt (or sit) on the bait site, my dogs will take notice and start barking/whining. They are free to roam my fenced in back yard and are quick to notice anything out of the ordinary in the pasture behind the house.

Although, they can’t get out….they DO bark if they see something….or if I leave them behind. Dogs barking at such a close distance might be something the hogs would spook from. BUT, I have witnessed both hogs and deer that seemed completely unconcerned with the dogs as long as they were not advancing their position (the dogs).


We frequently have deer feed close to the house and I’ve shot hogs in my pasture from as little as 125 yds. away (dogs barking the whole time). Conversely, hogs that have been “run” by dogs will usually vacate the area at the first sound of a dog, a truck door closing, a trailer rattling, a four-wheeler cranking up, you just never know.

Another potential problem (though solvable) involves livestock. I have 9 heifers and two horses in that pasture and they like to “loaf” around the stock tank until well after dark. Most hogs are not particularly bothered by livestock, but the cattle prefer to hang out in the same small corner the hogs are entering. I can pen the heifers up….if need be, but prefer not to do that every day.

My last “concern” involves the structure of this group. We have a single sow w/litter (not part of a sounder) and a young boar in attendance. Anytime I see a lone sow with little ones….I assume her to be more transient than sows in a sounder.

Sounders tend to have a home range (though it might be fairly large) and they claim the best habitat possible. It is not unusual to see the same sounder over and over again, whereas…I rarely see a lone sow more than once… unless she is trying to join another group.

This sow appears to have weaned her young….so will now be receptive to a boar and should breed again soon. I am really quite surprised to see this young boar tagging along with her instead of a dominant boar.

I suspect she is not yet in estrous or she’d likely have a larger, older suitor in tow.

What that means to me…is that time is fleeting if I want to catch the entire group and the odds of them staying in this area long enough for me to put up a trap and get them used to it…is slim.

So, my choices in this case seem to be:

1. Continue to feed at bait-site (while moving them about 75 yds. to a more open area), put up a trap and hope they stick around a few more days, then set the trap when they’ve become used to entering it.

2. Set up a stand, shoot the sow and immediately remove the carcass. Attempt to trap the shoats in the following few days (they will most often return to the spot the sow was), and just write off the boar.

3. Shoot the boar and hope that the sow and shoats will return to the bait site later for trapping (possibly with a larger boar attending her).

Risks:

Risk of scenario #1…would be that the entire group moves off before I can get the trap in place and get them “conditioned”. But, the small pigs work in my favor…since they will readily enter the trap (unless the sow happens to be trap shy and warns them). The boar is always a “maybe”… unless the sow is in estrous (or about to be)… in which case he would be more inclined to follow her.

In this instance, I would prefer to manually trip the release (when the greatest number of hogs are in the trap), rather than let them set it off themselves (one little pig might do that). But, putting up a stand close enough that I can trigger the doors… presents an additional risk I will be detected.


Risk of scenario #2 ….is simply… the shoats choose not to return. It’s a given that you’ll lose the boar but it’s a pretty good bet the shoats will come back for one or two days. The chances of getting a good clean shot on the sow are good, the chances of the shoats returning are decent…but they still have to be trapped.


Risk of scenario #3….. is the sow and shoats leave and don’t come back. Although this scenario potentially has the highest return (and would allow me more time to put up the trap), it also carries a high risk factor.

Decisions, decisions………………..!

Twmaster
August 8, 2011, 12:25 AM
Flint,

I've been reading this thread for a few weeks now as I have an interest in hunting hogs and coyotes here in Oklahoma.

It's enthralling to read your explanations surrounding your tactics and field craft.

Thank you. This is both educational and entertaining.

Flintknapper
August 8, 2011, 09:09 AM
This is encouraging. Hogs came in to the bait site right at dark and stayed until after midnight, had many pics of fairly relaxed hogs on the game-cam this morning. (Boar is on other side of panel next to the stock tank)

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/STHogs6.jpg

The amount of time spent there (3-1/2 hrs.) is a good indicator they are comfortable with the area. I am not surprised… since they are only a hop and a skip from some REALLY thick cover.

Mike1234567
August 8, 2011, 10:43 AM
@ Flintknapper: I'm very impressed with your immense practical experience and common sense approach to trapping/hunting.

Twmaster
August 8, 2011, 09:23 PM
Flint, have you decided how you are going to pursue this bunch?

From what you say it almost sounds like you can shoot at them from the kitchen window while sipping iced tea! ;)

Flintknapper
August 8, 2011, 10:06 PM
TW,

I think I will try and trap these first.

Shooting from a window is possible, but that practice got “nixed” about 10 years ago when my Daughter shot a buck from her bedroom window about 7:00 a.m. one Saturday. Atta Girl! (Just 14 yrs. old at the time)

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/bedroombuckSmall.jpg

Startled my wife in no small way…. so shooting from the house has been strictly “Verboten” ever since! :(

sixgunner455
August 11, 2011, 01:28 AM
Flint, it sounds like you need to send your wife to visit her mother, and stake out that waterhole from your kitchen with your daughter and her 7mm!

Golden Knights Karate
August 12, 2011, 09:34 AM
well I almost made it to the end of the thread without posting...

first, FK...good grief this is easily the best thread I've ever read on any forum

second, i thought I was a hunter until I read this thread...I see that I am not and have much to learn

third...I hope this thread continues so I have something to read each night after I go back to AF

and fourth...I see spotted hogs in those pics...is that one of the complications? are Spot's offspring off-limits as well?

regards,
Mark

Mike1234567
August 12, 2011, 10:39 AM
I fully agree with GKK and others. I don't hunt but this thread has taught me quite a bit regarding how to deal with feral hogs which is pertinent to my area. MUCH APPRECIATED FK!! BTW, I'd really like to see you start a "How To Hunt & Trap Feral Hogs" thread that can be stickied.

Flintknapper
August 12, 2011, 11:33 AM
Update:

Hogs are so frustrating! :(

Just when I have the group of hogs (Sow, Five Shoats and Black Boar) coming in regularly, something changes.

I decided it would be best to attempt to trap this group…so I set up a trap, set up a light, set up a stand nearby….then continued to bait them past the camera and toward the trap. All is going pretty well (hogs not entering trap yet, but probably will soon) when this spotted boar shows up.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/STHogs11.jpg


He ran the other Boar away and this one is either “trap smart” or has just kept the Sow and Shoats too busy for them get past the bait site at the camera. All feeding beyond the camera came to a halt.

Here… you can see the Boar with the Sow on the pond side of the fence and the shoats feeding on the bait/trap side but they did not feed past the camera.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/STHogs16.jpg


Camera goes on the blink the next night, so I have no clue what took place except that the corn continued to be eaten at the bait site only. Worked on camera the next night (found a cold solder joint on the PC board) got it up and running again.


Well…wouldn’t you know it, last night’s pictures show only the spotted Boar (about 20 pics over a 2 hr. period) and no Sow or Shoats. I did notice in the background of most pics…. there was a definite “eyeshine” signature just the other side of the fenceline. Something back there…but no way of knowing what.

Either the Boar has covered the Sow, run her away from the bait site….or she has left of her own accord.

This Boar will not hang around very long…..so I will have to try something pretty quick.

The Boar seems to use one spot at the fenceline to enter or leave, so that would be a good place to set a snare. Only problem is…this hog doesn’t have a very prominent jaw, which means the snare is much less likely to stay in place.


I don’t use Cam-Locks on my snares in case I catch something other than the target animal. A Berkshire lock can loosen enough to let an animal escape if they will stop pulling, slowly back up and the jaw-line or ear-bases don’t prevent it from slipping off.

Of course, THIS pig has a real straight neck (top and bottom) and a head the shape of a funnel, almost snare proof (with Berkshire locks).

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/STHogs18.jpg

Shooting him is probably not going to happen since I can’t get a stand near enough to the bait site to see him. Also, it doesn’t appear that he is using the pond to cool off in.

All of the pictures of have of him…when he is wetted, show no evidence of any mud on his feet or legs. My guess is… this pig is lying down in the water of a spring fed branch located about 75 yds. below the pond. It is impossibly thick back there, no way to intercept him.

Well….I need to go set up a “Hail Mary” snare and re-scout the area before it gets up to 100+ degrees out there.

Hogs! Be prepared to change “plans” often when dealing with these pests.:evil:

texas chase
August 12, 2011, 03:47 PM
looking forward to seeing the results!

Flintknapper
August 12, 2011, 06:41 PM
^^^^^^^^^

Yeah….me too.

I just got this pic in an email from an anonymous source.

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/STHogs18a.jpg

Somewhat curious, I searched the IP address and it came back with the hostname “SHUT-UP”. :confused:

Further investigation revealed that to be an Acronym for the group:

Spotted Hogs United To Uplift Porcine.

Now…..tell me hogs aren’t smart! ;)

Golden Knights Karate
August 12, 2011, 09:13 PM
I find it somewhat amusing that not only are the Hogs intelligent, but somehow Spot's offspring has access to email.

Flintknapper
August 12, 2011, 11:10 PM
Well....seriously, some hogs ARE really smart...others not so much (but learning).

We'll just see how this turns out. The best you can do is scrutinize each situation, apply what you know and hope for the best. If you can manage to keep a sense of humor along the way...all the better. :D

I'll report back....when/if I have significant results (one way or the other).


Flint.

Flintknapper
August 14, 2011, 02:46 AM
http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/STHogs21a.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/NoMas3.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/NoMas4.jpg

http://i110.photobucket.com/albums/n92/flintknapper/NoMas4-1.jpg

:)

Golden Knights Karate
August 14, 2011, 06:23 AM
:D
nicely done
:)

Harley Quinn
August 14, 2011, 08:45 AM
Good job... :) Warm nights, do you grow tomatoes???

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