Does more Velocity equate to longer accurate range?


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bigalexe
May 17, 2009, 12:33 AM
Im curious as to whether people have found that an increase in Velocity in the same rifle automatically equates to a longer accurate range.

It seems in theory that adding more velocity behind a bullet (all else being equal) would make that bullet fly further on a straighter trajectory. Is this true or is it more true that rifles have a Maximum at which the velocity is so great the bullet just flies all over the place.

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Ridgerunner665
May 17, 2009, 12:40 AM
No...not exactly.

Blackpowder rifles can be just as accurate at long range as the Super Duper Hang To Your Hat magnums...

But there are 2 different trains of though following them.

matrem
May 17, 2009, 12:52 AM
Given equally accurate rifles:
More velocity only means that you can get away with a bit more error in range estimating.

Runningman
May 17, 2009, 12:53 AM
Im curious as to whether people have found that an increase in Velocity in the same rifle automatically equates to a longer accurate range.
Nope, Unfortunately its not that simple. You have to find the sweet spot with a combination of many things such as bullet type, bullet weight, powder charge, powder type, primers, and overall length to name a few.

P.B.Walsh
May 17, 2009, 12:54 AM
So would that mean you could get a 20" .308 barrel out to 1000? Just very precise estimation.

General Geoff
May 17, 2009, 02:00 AM
All else being equal, higher velocity makes for a flatter trajectory and thus long distance shots easier.

R.W.Dale
May 17, 2009, 02:14 AM
if velocity ONLY effected external ballistics the the answer would be YES

but as we all know the flies in the ointment are things such as barrel harmonics, bullet stabilization, recoil pulse, pressure curves and many many other factors. All of which velocity changes can effect dramatically thus effecting accuracy as well

JohnKSa
May 17, 2009, 02:17 AM
More velocity only means that you can get away with a bit more error in range estimating.It also tends to reduce wind drift since wind drift is affected by TOF which goes down as velocity goes up.

Ridgerunner665
May 17, 2009, 02:29 AM
So would that mean you could get a 20" .308 barrel out to 1000? Just very precise estimation.

Yes...you can get a 20" 308 out to 1000 yards. And no matter if it has a 32 inch barrel...with the 308, precise range estimation is a must.

But there is more to it than that when you're talking 308's @1000 yards.

Bullet selection
You particular barrel's behavior (fast, slow)
Rate of twist

FlyinBryan
May 17, 2009, 02:30 AM
So would that mean you could get a 20" .308 barrel out to 1000? Just very precise estimation.

yes, you could shoot 1000yds with the right 20" barrel.

the most accurate ar barrel ive ever seen shoot 600 yds was 18" long.

the guy could hit a piece of notebook paper about 9 out of ten times.

different caliber, same use of physics and ideal weather conditions.

Jed Carter
May 17, 2009, 04:53 PM
Sir Isaac Newton says all objects fall at the same rate, in the first second 16 feet. From a level muzzel 4 feet from the ground it will take 1/4 second to hit the ground. How far the round travels in that time is determined by the velocity, due to inertia a heavier projectile will sustain speed longer and travel further traveling at the same muzzel velocity as a lighter one. For instance .223 match ammunition tends to be heavier bullets, averaging around 75 grains.

USSR
May 17, 2009, 05:12 PM
The problem you run into at LR with highpower rifles, is that at some point the bullet goes transonic. When this happens, accuracy usually goes out the window. As long as you are shooting at a distance where this doesn't happen, the velocity doesn't impact accuracy directly, other than the fact that higher velocities make you look better on missed wind calls.;)

Don

benEzra
May 17, 2009, 08:17 PM
Most definitely yes, and here's why.

When a bullet is comfortably supersonic, the trajectory is predictable. When a bullet is comfortably subsonic, the trajectory is predictable. But when a bullet is decelerating through the speed of sound (transonic), the trajectory is unpredictable, opening up the groups considerably.

Generally speaking, for modern spitzer bullets, the usable accuracy extends out as far as the bullet stays comfortably supersonic. A higher initial velocity pushes the transonic transition out further, giving you more usable range (assuming identical ballistic coefficient).

Also, higher velocity and flatter trajectory makes precise range estimation less critical, but it does not affect group size per se; the supersonic-transonic-subsonic transition does.

Titan6
May 17, 2009, 09:50 PM
Not to mention that if the bullet flies much too fast your range will actually be much shorter as the bullet will disintegrate. You have to understand that the bullet flies through the air which is not a vacuum but full of, well, air and other things.

jim in Anchorage
May 17, 2009, 10:01 PM
The problem you run into at LR with highpower rifles, is that at some point the bullet goes transonic. When this happens, accuracy usually goes out the window. As long as you are shooting at a distance where this doesn't happen, the velocity doesn't impact accuracy directly, other than the fact that higher velocities make you look better on missed wind calls.


I thought BT bullets where supposed to cure that.

USSR
May 17, 2009, 10:07 PM
I thought BT bullets where supposed to cure that.


Nope. The Sierra 168gr MatchKing bullet is one of the worst. Designed for 300 meter competition, the angle of the boattail is all wrong for LR use. When this bullet goes transonic, it gets REAL ugly. I was teamed up once with a guy using them at 1k. We had to continually call down to the pits to have them check his target for a hole.

Don

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