CZ 550 Safari Magnum .375


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jim in Anchorage
May 28, 2009, 08:57 PM
Any experiences/thoughts on it? I have never handled one but they look sharp in the pictures. The reason I am thinking about this is I am tired of the"wood" on my old ZKK 602[some sort of European fence post] and was thinking of upgrading it. Since the CZ is essentially the same Action as the ZKK[I have been told] and I have always liked the 602,aside from the wood,I wonder if a new CZ would be a easier route than restocking the gun I have.

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usmc1371
May 29, 2009, 12:23 AM
I won a cz 550 safari mag 375 last summer and so far I have only a couple boxes of shells through it but it is a great shooting and accurate rifle. Mine has a plain nothing special wood stock but its nice and fit and finish is not bad at all. The factory open sights are fast to aquire and built tough. Haven't killed anything with it but I am taking it deer hunting this fall and I have no doubt it will drop a mule deer. Recoil not any worse than my ruger M77 all weather 300wm.

usmc1371
May 29, 2009, 12:26 AM
it also feeds very smooth and ejects empties sevral feet

jim in Anchorage
May 29, 2009, 01:13 AM
Thanks. I will have to see if I can find one in stock to look at. I like the long Mauser extractor,which is why I bought the 602 in the first place. Won it huh? All I ever win is a upgrade on the Fry's in my Happy meal.:rolleyes:

benzy2
May 29, 2009, 01:17 AM
The 550 in .375 is one of my "dream" rifles. Its inexpensive enough to become reality but is far enough down the line that its still just a dream. One day, hopefully sooner than later, I will have one in the safe and out in the field.

Gordon
May 29, 2009, 01:19 AM
How much for the 602 ?

freakshow10mm
May 29, 2009, 01:19 AM
So far I've got a barrel and a stock. Saving up for an action from Brownells and then I can finish my .375 Holland.

jim in Anchorage
May 29, 2009, 01:38 AM
How much for the 602 ?
Not really selling right now,but it seems like someone asks every time I mention it. Why is there so much interest with the 550 available? When I first bought it[1990] it was the only true Magnum length Mauser available,so I could understand it. I guess what I am getting at is their some reason the 602 is perceived as better then the CZ?

TehK1w1
May 29, 2009, 02:07 AM
Because they tend to be difficult to find around here, and have an excellent reputation. I've looked for one myself without success. What is yours chambered in?

jim in Anchorage
May 29, 2009, 02:39 AM
.375. The reason they are hard to come by is because they where prohibited from US import most of their production lives[1965-1992? not sure of exact dates] being from a communist country. I think there was a short envelope[two-three] years that they could be imported,then they were discontinued. They seem to be much more numerous in the"Commonwealth country's" Canada,Australia, New Zealand[and Africa] that had no import restrictions.

wickedsprint
May 29, 2009, 11:30 AM
This rifle is also on my list of ones I want..especially since they started making a Kevlar stocked version.

http://www.cz-usa.com/data/productimg/main083.png

jsl3170
May 29, 2009, 11:50 AM
I have one of the first 25 LH CZ 550s in 375. It's a lot of machine but can be made into a hell of a rifle. I have mine at the gunsmith's as we speak.

For some addi info google Boatman and rifle to see a wonderful blog by Steve Boatman where he discusses the rifle and the action in various posts. These rifles are not preferred by African PHs and game rangers for nothing!

SaxonPig
May 29, 2009, 03:57 PM
When I got my 602 around 1987 I had to go through a Canadian importer and I paid through the nose.

Mine is not for sale.

The reason folks will chase a 602 when the 550 is readily available is because of human nature. We want something most when it's no longer available.

jim in Anchorage
May 29, 2009, 09:38 PM
Yeah I recall I paid somewhere between $600-$700 for mine,and that was 20 years ago. Probably could have bought 2 Rem. 700s

shinz
June 1, 2009, 07:58 AM
IMHO, I reckon that the wooden stocks on the 602s as shown by Geologist's one in this thread http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=5636009#post5636009 synthetic are some of the nicest & most comfortable around. Having said that, I would certainly like one to that design in a nice comfortable synthetic. Possibly handle recoil better than walnut, however well they look. BUT, I can't go the latest CZ stocks, Am I the only one that thinks they stuffed up the angle of the grip cap?
Steve

Reid73
June 1, 2009, 09:08 PM
For some addi info google Boatman and rifle to see a wonderful blog by Steve Boatman where he discusses the rifle and the action in various postsThis sample issue of Big Bore Journal (http://www.bigbore.org/images/Big%20Bore%20Journal%2023%20LR.pdf) has two articles re the CZ 550s.

If you believe Boatman's puff piece at pages 10-13, they are the best rifles going.

If you believe the comments on pages 17 and 18, the actions' very rough finish cause lots of feeding problems, and the stocks frequently split.

I suspect the average 550 magnum falls somewhere in between.

dubbleA
June 2, 2009, 02:14 PM
The actions on the 550's are a bit rough from the box but a little elbow grease and some compound help that greatly. I have heard/read about the stocks cracking myself but havent had any issues with this one in 416 Rigby.I think the latest versions have double recoil crossbolts installed from the factory to help with this. I'll go with a composite if and when I have troubel.

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f268/dubbleA/IMG_7549650.jpg

Deutsche Schuetzen
June 2, 2009, 02:44 PM
I purchased a .375 Brno (CZ ) now called the American Safari series .Mine has the upgraded wood.I topped it off with a Swarovski 4x36 scope with Talley QD rings .It shoots everything I feed it into a 1" group .Because it is so heavy the recoil is not noticeable.The weapon is very well balanced .If you do not mind the weight this is the best .375 around.I did not like the set trigger so I adjusted the "set " out of it and has a nice 3 lb. pull.My last time in Afrika I took a Whitworth .375 mauser and a Waffenfabrik Mauser .275 (7x57) I used the.275 mostly but if I return I will bring the CZ .375

win71
June 2, 2009, 03:25 PM
The older Czech Brno's, and that generally would have been prior communist block, were a higher grade rifle than todays CZ's. Importation during the communist days was close to zero.
CZK 602, 458
http://i175.photobucket.com/albums/w140/win71/ZKK602-458Win-a.jpg

Brno Mod 21, 7m/m
http://i175.photobucket.com/albums/w140/win71/Mod21-7mm-c.jpg

jkingrph
June 2, 2009, 06:08 PM
I purchased a 550 Safari Classic in .375 last summer. The local Gander Mountain had it and two others in stock, one a .458 Lott the other a .416 Rigby. I thought about it a couple of days, called and had them hold the .375 for me , primarily because it is a better choice for me just for shooting, and the wood looks as good as some of the upgrade wood. The other two were just not as pretty. Had the .416 been there when I picked mine up , it would have came home with me also.

Accuraccy, about 1.25MOA. It is a little heavy but I like that plus it fits me like a glove. I have a Leupold 2x7 scope in Talley QD rings .

The action when new is a bit stiff and the bolt tends to catch in a few places when cycling it. I removed magazine follower, and applied some Flitz to bolt and cycled it a couple of hundred times over the course of a few nights, cleaned well, lubed and still periodicly sit down and cycle it a bit. It is now very smooth, although not as good as some of the military or commercial Mausers with the anti bind guide.

Now if I ever run across a .416 with good wood!!

Maverick223
June 2, 2009, 06:59 PM
Nice rifle win71...I love that .458, is it WM or Lott? I plan to eventually get a CZ 550 in .458Lott. Almost ordered one but fell in love with a 45-70 first.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
June 2, 2009, 08:20 PM
I wonder if the Kevlar stocks would hold up to the big boomers better than the wood ones? I'd guess yes.

Are the laminated better or worse than the solid wood stocks at not splitting?

Also, sidebar, what are the pros & cons of these - .505 Gibbs, .458 Lott, .404 Jeffrey, and .416 Rigby - as a big game caliber choice, in terms of ballistics, ammo cost, ammo availability, felt recoil impulse, etc.?

Those are the African calibers offered in the CZs, besides the .458 winmag & .375 HH mag. Thanks.

Maverick223
June 2, 2009, 09:32 PM
First let me state my big game credentials...I have none, so the following is just my opinion and heresay...
The Kevlar stock was developed for Dangerous African game for the benefit of durability in humid environments, light weight, and strength. So, it is ideal for the big boys.

The pros/cons of the rounds that you mentioned are...
1. .505 Gibbs-big proven stopper but expensive rifle and costly to shoot and big on recoil
2. .458Lott-based upon an earlier cartridge, the .458Watts, proven stopper at relatively low cost, but big on recoil
3. .404Jeff.-pretty good stopper, expensive rifles and costly to shoot, less punishing recoil
4. .416Rigby-good stopper, expensive rifles and pretty costly to shoot, less punishing recoil
5. Don't forget about .470NE, 9.3mm, .500A-Square, .458WM, .600NE, .700NE, .577TRex, .375H&H, and countless others that I have missed.

Are you considering one? My pick will be the .458Lott (probably the most popular) due to the less expensive rifle, ability to shoot .458WM/.458Watts cartridges and load with 45-70 bullets (not cartridges...just the bullet), and because it is a proven stopper. FWIW if you go with a CZ Safari in .458 caliber get the .458Lott not the .458WM because the cost is slight, the .458WM has a tarnished reputation (in Africa at least), and most importantly the ability to shoot both Lott and WM ammo. But it is a Lott of rifle. :D

Gordon
June 3, 2009, 12:44 AM
After buying my first Kevlar stock from Chet Brown in 1979, his 4th I believe, I can say that they kinda suck on a heavy recoil rifle. The Kevlar fiber does not suck up the epoxy like fiberglass does. It creates a very brittle shell that is prone to catasrophic cracking. Like even in .308 I had one break at the wrist in cold weather. My .375 H&H 700 is now stocked in hand laid up Mc Millan fiberglass as the prior Kevlar custom shop one went tits up in a 100 rounds.
Good Laminated wood is the hardest thing of all to crack but is really heavy. which on any thing bigger than a .375 H&H is a good thing.A .505 Gibbs should weigh close to 11 pounds IMHO to be usefull.A .458 Lott at least 10, a .458 or a .416 about 9.5 and a .404 or .378 Weatherby 9 pounds, a .375H&H , well I have a Whitworth Custom one that weighs 8lb 13 with a S&B scope and Bastogne exihibition grade WR styled stock. My 700 Remington Stainless .375 in a Mcmillan sporter fiberglass stock weighs 7 lbs 12 oz with a !.75-6 VX3. Because it has a Gentry Quiet brake it has less recoil than the pound heavier Whitworth with no brake .
I have a .470 Nitro SxS in it's case which I won't shoot anymore as I HAVE been there and done that and don't want to crack the old 1930s dried out stock. Also have a Shultz and Larsen Action .378 Weatherby that is HUGE and a nasty kicker so it looks good in my Old Weatherby collection as does the German Made .460 Weatherby Mark V which I only have shot about 18 times in 20 years! That sucker has a Mestique (Desert Ironwood)stock and weighs about 10.5 pounds and I wished it weighed 20!

Maverick223
June 3, 2009, 01:03 AM
It creates a very brittle shell that is prone to catasrophic cracking.I imagine (but do not know for certain) that they have gotten better over the last few decades. I do know that there has been a lot of reviews where they were praised as being light (like you said not something I really want, but many do) and strong. Funny that you mention the .460 and desired weight...I was going to ask you what you would want in that beast, as I have heard that they are brutal. I have no desire for such a beast, I think I will do fine with a .458Lott or the like.

As a side note...I have shot a .375H&H, .416Rigby, and a .458WM. Having never shot a .458Lott how does it compare to the Winny (I know it's more...but is it substantial)? I have shied away from the .416Rigby due to the reduced magazine capacity, less ammo available, and additional cost of factory loads; I am starting to wonder if this was a good call...what do you think? Should I give the .416 a second look? Do you think it is my best option (Keep in mind I want a "cheap" big game rifle like the CZ)?

Reid73
June 3, 2009, 10:07 AM
Don't forget about .470NE, 9.3mm, .500A-Square, .458WM, .600NE, .700NE, .577TRex, .375H&H, and countless others that I have missed.Add .416 Rem Mag. to that list. It essentially duplicates the .416 Rigby's original ballistics, and ammunition costs less and is much more readily available, in North America at least.

Because the cartridge is shorter and slimmer, the pressure is significantly higher. That of course is not a selling feature, but neither is it a 'show stopper' for most purposes.

Tad, if you're seriously interested in buying a rifle in any of the calibres you list, you should consider joining the Big Bore Association (http://www.bigbore.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=18&Itemid=36).

Maverick223
June 3, 2009, 12:20 PM
Add .416 Rem Mag. to that list. If that is the only on I missed, I think I did good. :P

I checked out the Big Bore Association and they require too much information for me. They ask for everything except a Social Security No.

sahunter
June 4, 2009, 08:54 PM
There is always talk about wood stocks not handling the changes in temperature and humidity. Even if you are hunting in Africa the changes in temp and humidity can be severe even from dawn to midday. But if are going to shoot anything with a 458Lott or big 500 you are going to get up close. Most dangerous game is shot at close range, less than 50 yards. Elephants are sometimes less than 50 feet. There has to be a HUGE distortion of the stock to affect the flight of a 500 gr solid at dangerous game distances.

Also the target can be measured in "minute of buffalo" instead of MOA. This is why you use open sights, there is more margin for error although I must say that the stakes are much higher.
Most big game rifles have sights with flip up leaves for 75 yards. This shows how much the bullet will drop in 100 yards. So any possible distortion from the stock will be negligible.

Finally you really want the weight of wood to tame recoil. I have a friend who filled the butt of his Win70 Lott with lead shot to help out with the recoil. I can't imagine shooting a light synthetic in 458Lott unless I also filled the butt with lead.

I have a 375 brno with wood stock. It is steel bedded and has NO reinforcing screws. I have shot so many rounds through it i can't remember how many and there is no sign of any movement or cracking in the stock. I do think that the bedding helps a great deal though and the spacing between the tang and the pistol grip keeps the action from banging the stock where it would likely crack.

I would not want to go on a classic hunt with a synthetic stocked rifle. Where is the nostalgia. Every nick and scratch adds to the "value" of my hunting rifle.
Just my 2c.

Maverick223
June 4, 2009, 09:06 PM
Also the target can be measured in "minute of buffalo" instead of MOA.I agree, the targets are so close and large, that they are pretty difficult to miss, but make sure the rifle is reliable, there are no second chances and scarcely second shots.
I would not want to go on a classic hunt with a synthetic stocked rifle. Where is the nostalgia. Every nick and scratch adds to the "value" of my hunting rifle.I definitely agree, especially if given the chance to go to Africa, just saying that I think the Kevlar has improved over the last 30yrs.

EppieSA
October 15, 2009, 06:50 AM
Bought my ZKK602 in 375 H&H in 1992. Wood always looked good under the dull factory finish. Late last year I removed that finish and after many hours of sanding and ending with 2000 grit paper I started oiling it. Today it has the deep lustre of a good quality walnut stock though I have no idea as to what type of wood they used for my stock.

AH-1
October 15, 2009, 07:35 AM
I love my brno in 375 ouch & ouch:).it also isn't forsale.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v238/txpete/Abrno002.jpg

fwiw my rifle is very accurate with the lyman 375449 bullet.they are 280 gr with lube and gas check sized .377.
pete
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v238/txpete/375win001.jpg

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
October 15, 2009, 06:14 PM
Thanks Maverick223 and others.

usmc1371
October 15, 2009, 09:11 PM
I just used mine about ten days ago to take a smallish mule deer buck in eastern Oregon, I have to say that the cz carries lighter than it feels when you first pick it up. Mine wears an old leo fixed 4x scope in cz rings and was sighted in on the humid oregon coast. No noticable change in POI at over 4k feet in the high desert shooting federal factory 260 grain accubonds, a tat under 1.5 moa.

To all who said a 375 was/is to much gun for deer... well I didn't waste an ounce of meat. I made a head shot at about 30 yds. Won't be mounting this one there is not alot of head left. The round entered the base of the skull and exited thourgh the entire facial area. Not pretty but very effictive.

AH-1
October 15, 2009, 10:27 PM
thats why I like cast bullets in mine for hogs and deer.it doesn't ruin any meat and they drop like a rock.
pete

H&Hhunter
October 15, 2009, 11:32 PM
I've owned several 550's and they do have some negative issues.

1.The larger calibers are notorious for splitting stocks at the tang and through the pistol grip. I've even seen it in the relatively mild .375H&H version.

2. The new and "improved" safety on the 550 has a deadly habit of bouncing to the on position in recoil. Making a quick second shot impossible. I don't know any serious DG hunters who use 550's with unmodified safeties. They either install a M-70 three position style safety or there is a fix for the standard safety which keeps it from bouncing on at the most inopportune times.

3. The 550's tend to be pretty rough from the factory and some of them do have serious feed problems. I had one in .458 Lott that was a non feeding POS. But it was accurate if you could get it to eat.

Now here is what I like about the 550's they are well priced for a big bore DG rifle the action is solid and the design is time proven so with just a little work they can be made into the the most bullet proof, solid working mans DG rifle on the planet for not to much money. The main things that need modification are the stocks which should be correctly bedded which takes care of most splitting problems and any worries about shifting zero. Or just go with the Kevlar version and the problem is solved. Some of them need a little action polish and the feed lips sometimes need a bit of tweaking.

Over all they are a very good rifle for the money. Keeping in mind that most factory rifles need some tweaking to make them into reliable DG rigs.

I agree, the targets are so close and large, that they are pretty difficult to miss, but make sure the rifle is reliable, there are no second chances and scarcely second shots.

I agree with you however there are an awful lot of buffalo wounded that need to be followed up every year. So while the kill zone is larger and the shots generally closer, shot placement is still critical and the kill zones not as large as many would suspect. I've had a double lunged buffalo stay alive for 30+ plus minutes and was in full fight when I spined him in full charge at muzzle burn distance. I've found that the most effective and sure first killing shot is above the heart into the "spaghetti" junction which is much further forward and higher than you'd think on the shoulder. I used this shot on my last buff with a .375H&H and a 300 gr TSX and he went down for the count inside of 50 yards. He died much quicker than any of the other buff I've killed using traditional heart lung shot placement. A good friend of mine who's killed a dozen or so buff showed me this trick and I find that it really works well. Good placement makes for a lot less drama on buff.

Maverick223
October 16, 2009, 01:58 AM
Thanks Maverick223 and others.I don't know how much help I was, but you are welcome. Have you decided or bought a dangerous game rifle yet. I am still shopping, but have narrowed my search and decided upon the .375H&H for trajectorial :D reasons despite the additional cost of reloading (vs. the .458Lott). I have also decided to convert my .45-70 to a .45-120 Nitro Express (loaded to approximately .450NE#2 loads) to satisfy my desire for a bigger boomer.

I agree with you however there are an awful lot of buffalo wounded that need to be followed up every year.Right you are, shot placement is always important...often times just hitting the animal is not good enough...particularly the really big ones or the ones with teeth/claws.

:)

Uncle Mike
October 16, 2009, 02:03 AM
Well, if your bustin; stocks, something isn't right.

You'll not bust a stock because of the recoil itself!

As for Kevlar being 'better' than wood for big boomers, I don't necessarily think so.

H&Hhunter
October 16, 2009, 11:20 AM
You'll not bust a stock because of the recoil itself!

No it's a bedding problem as I mentioned. It also has to do with poor quality wood used on CZ rifles and poor grain choice through the grip. But if you don't think that recoil can break poorly chosen and non bedded action/horribly fit stocks either wood or Kevlar in a big bore you haven't spent much time around them.

Uncle Mike
October 16, 2009, 02:37 PM
But if you don't think that recoil can break poorly chosen and non bedded action/horribly fit stocks either wood or Kevlar in a big bore you haven't spent much time around them.

Non-bedded actions, or shoddy bedding jobs, horribly fit actions, poorly chosen wood grain.... as I said, it aint just the recoil!

Maverick223
October 16, 2009, 09:10 PM
H&H you obviously have more experience than me (sarcasm not intended), what say you about fancy, highly figured wood on a moderate-large bore dangerous game rifle (like a .375H&H or a .458Lott)...Will it hold up if well bedded with cross bolts? What about a wood (laminate or otherwise) thumb-hole stock (no intentions of using one, just thought about it after seeing one a few days ago)? :)

H&Hhunter
October 17, 2009, 01:31 AM
Maverick,

There is no problem with fancy marbled wood on a big bore as long as the grain flow is correct through the grip. Besides being ugly laminate is a good choice, cross bolting and bedding is not an option on a big bore it is a necessity. IMHO thumb hole stocks have no place on a heavy rifle. Serengeti stocks makes a very good looking laminate by the way.

Maverick223
October 17, 2009, 02:14 AM
Thank you for the info., H&H. I do like nice wood, but have been avoiding it due to rumors that it wouldn't hold up under strong recoil, it is refreshing to find out that it isn't necessarily true. I don't care too much for laminate (I don't dislike it, but find a nicely figured walnut more pleasing), but it looks good on certain firearms, and a little nicer than birch and other "plain" species of wood. :)

H&Hhunter
October 18, 2009, 10:55 AM
This weekend I am visiting one of the finest big bore and double rifle smiths in the country. He made a comment about wood, the better the wood the stronger it is. Meaning that a fine piece of Turkish or English with excellent figuring and correct grain flow is going to be stronger than a non figured piece of junk. So yes a decent piece of wood that has been correctly chosen for grain is better suited than a hunk of mother of fence post.

usmc1371
October 18, 2009, 02:39 PM
H&H, whats your thought on the cz synthitic stock? My 550 (375) has the cheapest plain/non pretty wood offerd and I thought about changing it out for the non wood option. I hunt in the rain and snow quite a bit so my train of thought is that the plastic stock will handle the weather better than the wood.

Maverick223
October 18, 2009, 05:27 PM
Meaning that a fine piece of Turkish or English with excellent figuring and correct grain flow is going to be stronger than a non figured piece of junk.That is good to know, I wouldn't have thought that would be the case.

I hunt in the rain and snow quite a bit so my train of thought is that the plastic stock will handle the weather better than the wood.Absolutely, properly constructed synthetic is stronger, lighter, more stable, and more weather resistant than its wood counterpart. It doesn't look as good IMO so I usually stick to wood depending upon the rifle and the intended use (synthetics for all target rifles). :)

H&Hhunter
October 19, 2009, 12:36 AM
H&H, whats your thought on the cz synthitic stock?
I have two buddies who have gone to the CZ kevlar stock and both say they are really good. Just keep in mind that to make them really right they still need to be bedded.

H&Hhunter
October 19, 2009, 01:02 AM
Ok here is what I am talking about. This is the stock on my .470 notice that it has fairly nice figure and the grain through the pistol grip is correct and flows along the line of recoil. This is a correct flow pattern for the grain of the wood.
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y187/GTAllyn/DoubleriflestockPHmodel-1.jpg
The picture blow is of a horrible grain flow and this stock cracked within 50 rounds all the way through just aft of the tang.
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y187/GTAllyn/PHMODELBUTTSTOCK.jpg
Here is the stock on my .404 Jeffery and it is another example of correct grain flow that leads to some nice figure in the butt stock
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y187/GTAllyn/Dakotaactionbolt1.jpg
Here is a picture showing the figure not super fancy but very elegant IMO.
http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y187/GTAllyn/Dakotabuttstock1.jpg

As a word of caution Claro should NEVER be used on a heavy recoiling rifle it simply isn't dense enough. Stick to Turkish or English walnut on a heavy gun. Anybody who tells you that figure makes a stock weaker doesn't have a clue. You simply have tick the correct piece of wood.

Maverick223
October 19, 2009, 01:31 AM
As a word of caution Claro should NEVER be used on a heavy recoiling rifle it simply isn't dense enough. Stick to Turkish or English walnut on a heavy gun.I see, this is likely what others have warned me about. I think I will go with Circassian walnut for its beauty and strength. Thanks again for the guidance, H&H. :)

BBroadside
October 19, 2009, 01:56 AM
Out of curiosity, are there still any countries that forbid shooting big game with anything less than .40 caliber? Something to consider....

H&Hhunter
October 19, 2009, 12:07 PM
Out of curiosity, are there still any countries that forbid shooting big game with anything less than .40 caliber? Something to consider....

Not to my knowledge no.

t165
October 19, 2009, 02:03 PM
The BRNO 602 and Current CZ Safari 550 Magnum are the same gun except for a few minor differences. Anyone attempting to say one is better than the other is saying so because that is the one they own. Most parts are interchangable. The basic action of the two guns are the same.

The newer stocks are simply better than the older stocks. Modern recoil pads as opposed to plastic buttplates or older technology recoil pads. And an added advantage of the new 550's is the factory installed crossbolts. Not to mention factory synthetic stocks which do away with stock splitting altogether. The "old" 602 can easily be brought up to snuff with these add ons.

The older 602 had a pop up emergency peep sight built into the rear receiver bridge. The express sights are very stout but they have been damaged before. Instead of ending a hunt right there all one had to do was to pop up the peep sight and keep hunting. Really neat feature. CZ might offer this feature from it's custom shop.

I own an older CZ 550 Safari Magnum in 458 Lott. The Pachmayr Decelerator pad really helps in spreading out the recoil. I wish my rifle had the crossbolt stock. I paid $850.00 for it 4-5 years ago IIRC. As to whether or not the older BRNO's were better finished we'll never know...there are no new BRNO 602's to compare the new CZ 550 Safari Magnums to. I do know my 550 is a slick operating rifle. Better than the new Rugers, Remingtons, Savages, and other brands I have bought over the last 10 years. I have 5 CZ rifles. The beforementioned CZ 550 Safari Magnum in 458 Lott. A CZ 550 in 30-06. A 527 in 22 Hornet. And (2) 452 American rifles in 17 HMR and 17 Mach II. All are great rifles. Buy CZ...you will not be sorry.

H&Hhunter
October 19, 2009, 09:13 PM
The BRNO 602 and Current CZ Safari 550 Magnum are the same gun except for a few minor differences. Anyone attempting to say one is better than the other is saying so because that is the one they own.

T165,
I agree with you except that the new safety on 550 is an abomination. Instead of redesigning something rugged and useful they quick fixed it and it has major issues. Otherwise I agree with your post for the most part.

t165
October 19, 2009, 10:41 PM
From what I can see the current safety on the CZ 550 Safari Magnum is exactly the same as the older BRNO 602 except the 550 safety is forward to fire and the 602 is forward to set safety. Complete opposites. I haven't read of any problems with the 550's safety. Perhaps I need to do some more research. Could you direct me to any information regarding problems with the 550 safety. If there is one thing on a gun which has to work correctly it is the safety.

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