Best cammo?


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AKCamper
June 2, 2009, 11:34 PM
I have been looking for a good efective cammo coat that will fit my needs and i would appreciate anyones sujections and opinions.
So far i have looked at the Sitka Gear stormfront and It looks good online but I once had a chance to inspect a SItka gear 90% jacket and came to the conclusion that I would tear it up.
I am wondering about Brownings hells canyon jacket.

I am mainly looking for something that will be form fitting and be waterproof or nearly waterproof and windproof(usualy a result of waterproof)
Insulation dosn't matter much because I have a good insulation system.
Thanks

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interlock
June 3, 2009, 04:50 AM
really i don't think cammo pattern matters all that much. I wear an M65 woodland jacket or a british DPM smock, both are fine. I also have a green fleece i wear (no camo). what does make a difference is the fieldcraft employed whilst wearing it. The modern breathable waterproof and quiet materials are all really really good. any should be ok

kanook
June 3, 2009, 11:32 AM
where are you hunting? what are you hunting? how are you hunting?

jhco
June 3, 2009, 11:43 AM
Yes the right camo is highly dependant on what and where you hunt.

interlock
June 3, 2009, 05:10 PM
move slowly and hunt the wind.... thats the best camo

stevelyn
June 4, 2009, 01:31 AM
ASAT is probably the best. Predator would be my second choice.

http://www.dayonecamouflage.com

AKCamper
June 4, 2009, 11:49 AM
I am planing on hunting in texas in the winter and in the alaska coast during breakup.
So this means i need something with windstoping ability and something that is going to keep me dry in a constant rain.

I dont like those coats that are all bulky because it tends to get hung up when im sneaking through the thick woods.

Smokey Joe
June 4, 2009, 01:26 PM
AK Camper--So this means i need something with windstoping ability and something that is going to keep me dry in a constant rain.Your most important requirements have nothing to do with the camo pattern that you choose.

IMHO, if you're hunting mammals, the camo pattern doesn't matter all that much--they don't see color very well, except some in the blue area for deer--all you need is something to break up your outline so that you don't look like an obvious human or other predator.

Now, ducks & geese, if you'll be waterfowling, have good color vision, and the camo pattern is more important, but even there, it's more important to break up your outline than anything else.

Seems to me that something Goretext or similar should do just fine for stopping rain & wind, and I'd get it in whatever camo pattern I could find, and large enough for layering underneath. You'll have to be the judge as to whether a given coat is too bulky.

If you're asking for a specific brand of coat to buy, that's like Ford vs. Chevy--everyone has their favorite, and their reason(s) for damning the opposition. Nothing, repeat, nothing, is gonna keep you absolutely dry in an Alaska monsoon, anyhow.

Art Eatman
June 4, 2009, 02:12 PM
In Texas, for other than birds, any old dull earth tone will do. Even when bird hunting here, old khakis work fine, as the grass is commonly tan to brown at that time of year. Gotta do something about your shiny little face, though.

Temperatures? Anywhere from not far below freezing to 80F. "Layers". Always think layers. Here in the Big Bend, I've seen dawn temperatures of 25 and then seen it get to 85 by 2PM--and then down to 50 or so by dark.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
June 5, 2009, 02:03 PM
I've seen dawn temperatures of 25 and then seen it get to 85 by 2PM--and then down to 50 or so by dark.

Jiminy Christmas! :eek:

Yeah, the question is about what features of gear, not camo. As for camo, doesn't matter on mammals, but for all-around, Mossy Oak "Brush" is an excellent camo. As for what gear, yes, layers is more important than actual gear. Layers you can take on and off, and a backpack to carry the shed layers in. If it's cold you want LOOSE boots, good wool socks, and lots of warm layers (fleece, wool, with silk or polypropylene underlayers). As for rain gear, in light rain, I thrown oversized Frogg Toggs on over whatever I'm wearing. I don't hunt in heavy rain - not purposely anyway. Yes, I did spray paint some black lines on my tan Frogg Toggs to break up the outline.

juk
June 6, 2009, 01:11 AM
My Gamehyde setup has kept me warm and dry during many a wet day in the duck blinds. Also, the froggtoggs are very good at protecting against the elements. They are usually very light, but are also very resilient and tough.

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