The 870 Ejector thread?


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Virginian
June 4, 2009, 01:02 AM
I am assuming that thread went off the The High Road and into the ditch. I know we can all be a pain, but when a thread has some useful information in it, and it then does go in the garbage can as they will sometimes do, is there any way the moderators could edit it and then lock it, or will the script even let you do that?
Again, I know it's a pain, but sometimes I will put a little time and effort into trying to help solve someone's problem, and I hate to see that go out the window just because some people have to air their dirty laundry on the board.

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xm21
June 4, 2009, 01:39 AM
I thought it had some good info also.Threads like that one sure beat wading through the birdshot vs. buckshot in my home defense shotty threads.Oh well,as a Frenchman would put it;say lah vee:D

Dave McCracken
June 4, 2009, 11:08 AM
Call me lazy, burntout or just skeptical, but if I brought it back my guess is it'd take less than 24 hours before the Sturm Und Drang was back up past my tolerance threshold.

Sorry. It stays in the vault.

Badger Arms
June 4, 2009, 12:35 PM
I'll sum it up:

The Remington ejector is riveted to the left side of the receiver. It is a "U" shaped piece of metal originally made from stamped steel. A notch at the rear of the ejector kicks the case out of the shotgun as it extracts from the chamber. There is a spring that assists the ejector that is held in by the front rivet.

The ejector spring can catch on stuff like cleaning rods and break off. It can also dislodge from the rivet. If it dislodges, you can replace it and restake the rivet sometimes. If it breaks, you usually have to take the front rivet out to replace the spring.

The extractor (that fat "U" shaped channel of metal) can wear out or chip. Modern Express shotguns are made from MIM (Metal Injection Molding) that is not as durable as the original stamped parts. My Express model came from the factory with a stamped-steel part, so I don't know what the cutoff is, but MIM parts are only seen on newer Express models, from what I can gather. Never seen the MIM part. If you have a Wingmaster, SPS, or Police version, you've got a stamped part and it should last the lifetime of the gun.

RandKL
June 4, 2009, 03:14 PM
Good sum up, Badger....except that you got "extractor" and "ejector" confused several times.

If your ejector has a mold number, it's injection molded from powdered metal and should be changed if the chance arises.

Good, short thread.

richard

Snarlingiron
June 4, 2009, 04:14 PM
A quick perusal of the Remington parts list shows only 3 12 ga ejectors.

99698 Ejector 12 ga Exp Super Mag $9.00
99916 Ejector 12 ga LH $6.90
99539 Ejector 12 ga MAG $9.00

It also lists 3 extractors:

99046 Extractor 12-20 GA EXP (MIM) $7.50
16476 Extractor 12-20-16 GA $12.90
14681 Extractor 12 GA LH $12.90

Clearly there is no differentiation between the Ejectors, so my assumption is that they are the stamped steel just as they always have been. That is certainly the case on my 2 Express guns. The Ejector Spring is just that, a spring and thus not MIM. Extractors are a different story. The Express extractor is clearly labeled as being for the Express, and is also clearly labeled as being a MIM part.

Badger Arms
June 4, 2009, 05:39 PM
You are correct that the parts listed in your 2005 parts list show a MIM extractor but do not say anything about the makeup of the Ejector. However, the link below is commonly given out to explain the differences between military and Express models. This might be a new development with the MIM ejector and, as I stated earlier, I've never seen one, but the below PDF is the ONLY thing I've ever seen that says the EJECTOR is MIM.

Why the MIM ejector would not be listed is a mystery. Perhaps they just don't sell the MIM, only put it on their production guns. If it's already broke, labor is going to be many times the amount saved by putting an MIM part back in. Not so with the simple extractor that can be changed in under a minute with little skill or tools involved. The other possibility I could think of is that, since it's a 2005 parts list you're getting the data from, the MIM part might be on the newest parts list? Somebody should call Remington and ask.

http://www.remingtonmilitary.com/articles/870ExpvsPol6-30-05.pdf

Here's a photo of the Ejector assembly. At top is the Ejector, below that is the Spring, and below that are the front rivet with the smaller extension to go through the Ejector Spring. The other is the rear rivet. The ejector and spring are aproximate scale and orientation but the rivets have been blown up for detail.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=99413&stc=1&d=1244151387

rcmodel
June 4, 2009, 05:39 PM
Good info Snarlingiron.

Seems more then one poster have their Extractors & Ejectors mixed up!

It would be very hard to MIM an 870 ejector spring.

Not so hard to MIM an 870 extractor!

rc

Virginian
June 4, 2009, 06:09 PM
I think replacing the rivet is a major pain in the rear end. It is impossible to get it to perfectly match the receiver without refininshing them both together.
If you have a 2-3/4" receiver, and the ejector and ejector spring are sized for 2-3/4" rounds (believe it or not, some of them had 3" ejector parts from the factory), you can convert it to 3" configuration by carefully prying the spring off the rivet, taking a Dremel and grinding the rail on the ejector so that the step is 1/4" further to the rear, and then replacing the spring with the magnum version, and re-rivet things.
If your rivet breaks off at the spring holding step, you can drill and tap it and attach the new spring with a screw.
Your results may vary, but I think either course beat the heck out of replacing that rivet. I have never broken one personally, but I have fixed several.

RandKL
June 4, 2009, 06:51 PM
The original poster in that god-forsaken and gratefully dead thread had a MIM ejector as I've said. If he would care to repost his pics, you can compare yours to his.

The steel parts have the gauge stamped on one end and nothing more....the molded parts have a molded in mold number in the middle. It's normally hidden by the spring so unless anyone wants to break theirs off to find out, just hope for the best.

On the Remington parts list, the left-handed 870 Express ejector is clearly marked "MIM". Why the right-hand isn't, I don't know. Other than the Remington link that Badger gave and his explanation, that you're seeing a list of the replacement parts (to which I agree), not the original parts, that's about all I can say on it. I've replaced a small number of steel ones in my career, and a much larger number of cast ones. The steel ones make a "ping" when dropped on a table. The cast ones are more of a....it's hard to describe. The steel ones have nice rounded edges on the back from being stamped at high pressure....the cast ones are more "rough" and square looking. The steel ones often have grind marks on the front edges from being cleaned up. The molded ones don't.

Someone feel like calling Remington?

I'm done. You folks continue.

richard

Snarlingiron
June 4, 2009, 09:34 PM
Thanks for the link, Badger Arms. That indeed makes it pretty clear, i.e. the last sentence:

"Police shotguns use machined ejectors and extractors, as opposed to powdered metal cast which are utilized on the Express models."

Good stuff.

I'm thinking that the call to Remington should be made when you have to order a replacement to insure that you get the stamped ejector and not the MIM part.

Virginian
June 4, 2009, 10:16 PM
If you get an ejector from Remington, it is stamped. It appears they are marking the MIM parts as such on the parts list. But you have to watch out ordering 1100 extractors so they aren't too thick, and you have to ask for the old style gas pistons and piston seals, or you get the new and not so improved version.

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