Positively foolish revolver question


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Shmackey
January 18, 2003, 01:20 AM
Forgive me; I've never shot a revolver older than one from the '70s. What exactly is a hand-ejector model? The Internet was surprisingly unhelpful in answering this.

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Hkmp5sd
January 18, 2003, 01:29 AM
Hand-ejector is when the cylinder swings out and you use your hand to push the ejector rod to empty the cartridge cases. A self-ejector is the type with the hinged frame that pushes the cartridges out whenever the gun is opened.

Shmackey
January 18, 2003, 01:52 AM
I KNEW it was something like that--something where ALL of the ones I've been using were hand-ejectors. Or something where they were an exotic thing from 1948. The former, apparently.

Sneaky...

Shmackey
January 18, 2003, 01:57 AM
Of course this begs the question: why was S&W trying to confuse me with a model from their Performance Center called the "Hand Ejector?" That's where things got confusing. Was this, at one point in time, a "feature?"

Mike Irwin
January 18, 2003, 02:01 AM
Shmackey,

Hand Ejector is a phrase Smith & Wesson adopted in 1896 to describe their new revovlers in advertising to distinguish them from the company's breaktop "automatic ejector" revolvers.

Colt had come out with a swing-cylinder revolver a number of years before, but it was S&W that adopted the name Hand Ejector to describe all of its solid frame swing cylinder designs.

hand ejector, small letters, describes any revolver with a swing cylinder design.

Hand Ejector, capital letters, describes Smith & Wesson manufactured revolvers with swing cylinders.

jar
January 18, 2003, 12:29 PM
When Smith brought out the HE line (frame size comparable to the K frame) they were also making the top bread Double Action line. The top break models automatically ejected the cartridges when opened. The new models had a stronger frame since there was no hinged section, but you lost the auto eject feature of the DA.

here's a model 3 38DA for comparison.
http://www.fototime.com/7480619DB16179C/standard.jpg

and open
http://www.fototime.com/5962B686E24F525/standard.jpg

Mike Irwin
January 18, 2003, 12:47 PM
Jar,

Which came first, the proto-J frame or the proto-K frame?

The answer may surprise you...

The proto-J frame, in 1896.

Beat the proto-K frame by nearly 3 years.

4v50 Gary
January 18, 2003, 12:54 PM
Let me think Mike...

(click... click... click...)

The proto J frame? Did I guess right?

seeker_two
January 21, 2003, 11:26 AM
The "proto-J" frame was called the I-Frame. That's what the small .38S&W, .32S&W, & .22LR pocket revolvers were made on. The J-Frame wasn't made until the 1950's for the .38SPL.

Mike Irwin
January 21, 2003, 11:36 AM
Seeker,

Duh. Don't know why I typed in J frame when I know damned well what the drill is on them. Brain fart, I guess.

Trivia question for YOU.

What frame was even smaller than the I-frame?

Johnny Guest
January 21, 2003, 06:56 PM
What frame was even smaller than the I-frame? I don't know the letter designation, but I imagine you're referring to the original-issue Ladysmith .22.

:p
Johnny

Marshall
January 21, 2003, 07:16 PM
Bet it falls between A and H :scrutiny:

Mike Irwin
January 22, 2003, 12:36 AM
Johnny,

You're right, but you don't get credit for NOT knowing the answer to the question.

Marshall, sorry, but you're wrong.

'Twas the M frame.

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