Hornady ammo


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schlockinz
June 13, 2009, 06:34 PM
So, I've got a question about 2 types of hornady ammo that I'm shooting right now.

30.06 light magnum interbond.
Plan on using this on white tail, I'm just curious what this bullet is going to do to the meat when compared to a more tradition bullet (like winchesters power point)

45-70 Leverution
How well do these perform on hogs? Where I hunt we have some brutes that will push the 400lb or higher mark, I want to be sure that this bullet will give good enough penetration to stop them in their tracks, I don't want to deal with an animal that size and pissed, even if it only lasts a minute. Will I be able to shoot through both shoulders with this load?

Thanks in advance

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ArmedBear
June 13, 2009, 07:04 PM
Plan on using this on white tail, I'm just curious what this bullet is going to do to the meat when compared to a more tradition bullet (like winchesters power point)

That's an interesting question. The Interbond is supposed to hold together better than traditional jacketed bullets (similar to Nosler Accubond, etc.).

There are two scenarios, assuming that Hornady is telling the truth (I don't doubt that they are):

1. Both bullets hold together. Then they'd probably act about the same.

2. The older-style bullet fragments. Then you can get anything from minimal penetration, to a relative mess, to "about the same."

I think that bullets like the Interbond, Accubond, etc. are designed to perform the way that older jacketed bullets are supposed to, so in theory, the meat would be about the same -- and if an older bullet did fall apart, you might have to shoot more often, meaning more meat damage.

Not sure about the LE ammo. Interested in that, too.

That said, what distance are you looking to shoot with it?

.45-70 is some pretty effective stuff with hardcast lead bullets -- forget expansion, just use a big bullet and let the weight of the thing punch a big hole. It can have a trajectory that's really disconcerting to a modern hunter, though.:) Hence, Leverevolution bullets to flatten it out some.

dakotasin
June 13, 2009, 09:19 PM
in a 30-06 assuming a 165 grain or heavier bullet, armed bear's scenario 1 is your answer. if you are going w/ 150's, you may see a slight benefit w/ the interbonds, and but not a whole lot.

ArmedBear
June 13, 2009, 10:30 PM
Note that bonded bullets, solids (Barnes, and now some others), Partitions, etc. really are more commonly used for hunting animals like elk, with thicker hides and a lot of muscle.

I've been hearing stories lately: even the bonded bullets don't always hold their weight so well in elk.

jbkebert
June 13, 2009, 10:55 PM
I've been hearing stories lately: even the bonded bullets don't always hold their weight so well in elk.

I took a mule deer at 75 yards +/- with a 7mm STW shooting a 139 grain interbond handload. After passing through the shoulder on a quartering shot the bullet was found underneath the skin on the opposite side. Retained bullet weight was 123 grains not to darn bad. Bullet held up very well even at a average speed of 3356 FPS. I am happy and beleive in the bullets.

ArmedBear
June 13, 2009, 11:00 PM
I should have said it specifically: these stories are about elk, not deer -- surprisingly low retained weights sometimes with premium bullets (not Hornady specifically).

I'm working up a load with Hornady GMX at the moment. Results seem good so far, but I'm in very early stages.

GMX is Hornady's competition for the tipped Barnes.

schlockinz
June 13, 2009, 11:03 PM
The '06 is with 150gr bullets, kinda kicking myself now for not going to 165, but that may happen later on.

The 45-70, I'd like to be able to shoot out to 150 if need be, but most likely it'll be under 100 yds, and even more likely to be in the 50 range. I went with the leverutions due to price (cheaper than some of the other "mag" loads), I hope to eventually start handloading this caliber with a flat nosed bullet and try to mimic the buffalo bore loads, but right now I'm not setup for anything like that.

Thanks for all the input.

jbkebert
June 13, 2009, 11:05 PM
I will be interested to see what they do on elk. My buddy and I both drew CO elk tags and will head out this fall. I am loading up a 180 interbond for my .300 win and he will be shooting a 7mm STW I think with the same 139gr Interbond. I will let you know how they perform if we are sucessful.

I was very surprised given the short range that I took that buck at and the velocites involved the the bullet held up so well.

dakotasin
June 14, 2009, 09:40 AM
last year my hunting partner ran 225 interbonds in his 338 for elk, and i ran 225 interlocks. no problems encountered in either rifle.

i don't consider monolithic bullets or bonded bullets or a-frame bullets necessary, however, until muzzle velocity surpasses the 3100 or so f/s mark at the muzzle. exception being for 257 and smaller bullets. as such, my 30-06, 308's, etc etc run standard cup-and-cores, and my 257 rob, 25-06 etc shoot heavy-for-caliber bullets to 1 - keep velocity down and 2 - have a heavier jacket.

hardluk1
June 14, 2009, 11:40 AM
For deer does hornady offer the sst for the 06 in the light mag? If yes shoot it. And if you can place a bullet well not even a ballistic tip will screw up any meat. You are shooting a bolt or single shot right? No semi-autos with the LM ammo. I would rather use a hard cast flat point or a barnes x than the leveration if breaking both sholders is the object. But it will do the job just fine. It will take out one shoulder and destroy the lungs. Use it.

schlockinz
June 14, 2009, 11:54 AM
For deer, or similar animals, I try to put the bullet right at the rear of the shoulder blade, which causes me to hit shoulders every now and then, maybe about 30% or so of my longer shots will hit the shoulder.

Well, it looks like I'll sight in with the stuff, shoot it till I'm out, then switch to loading 165s instead (just in case I ever do get that Elk draw)

H&Hhunter
June 14, 2009, 12:34 PM
DO NOT use Leverevoultion ammo on anything tougher than a deer. It is very soft and very frangible. A good friend just lost another hog to that ammo on a gun writers hunt in Texas. It should have a warning on it. NOT FOR USE IN SERIOUS HUNTING.

As far as Interbond goes. I have a PH friend in Africa who used 180 gr IB's in his loaner .30-06 for plains game for the entire season last year. He said it was absolutely wonderful, great weight retention excellent terminal performance and deep straight line penetration on everything from Dikker to Eland. I am going to try some this year.

.45Guy
June 14, 2009, 01:02 PM
I'll have to agree wit H&H on the .45-70 Leverlution. Though I must say it does wonders on groundhogs and the occasional bunny....

ArmedBear
June 14, 2009, 07:37 PM
.45-70 is really designed to work completely differently from a modern cartridge: Put a big hardcast bullet in it, and velocity be damned.

I shot a 520 grain Lyman Postell straight through a buffalo, where the bullet kept going, with a black powder charge at about 80 yards. That's all it took to drop a buffalo: a single, non-expanding lead bullet going maybe 1300 fps at the muzzle. We had to be careful not to shoot two buffalo with one shot, when they bunched up.

The trajectory is hard to master for a modern shooter used to relying on velocity instead of learning a trajectory. We're talking feet of drop where most of us are used to inches. However, the big bullets work without any special help, when they hit.

While the LE stuff offers a lot to the .30-30 Winchester or .35 Remington shooter hunting deer, I'd consider just hitting a hog with something big and heavy from a .45-70, and getting ready for a followup shot if necessary.

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