CCW in two different states?


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missouri dave
June 14, 2009, 01:01 PM
Hope this doesn't sound nuts BUT if you own a home in two different states (think snowbird here) is it possible to have a ccw in BOTH states?

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megatronrules
June 14, 2009, 01:12 PM
yes it is or you could see if the two states you own a home in honor each other's carry permits. There are alot of states that will issue a carry permit to a non resident as well,what are the two states in question?

missouri dave
June 14, 2009, 01:17 PM
It's for a friend that owns a home in Iowa and Florida. Iowa doesn't recognize any other permits I think.

41022collector
June 14, 2009, 01:26 PM
Some states have a reciprical license that if you have one in one state, other states honor that same CCW, sadly, with Florida not having a income tax, they require a licnse for their state to be paid for, but Iowa may allow the reciprical status for the Florida CCW. I am not sure on this.

Mike

christcorp
June 14, 2009, 02:24 PM
Also; Florida doesn't require the person getting the CCW permit to be a RESIDENT. However; states such as Colorado, in order to HONOR the reciprocity of Florida, requires that the CCW Permit Holder be a RESIDENT of the state in which the permit was issued. In other words, if you are from New Jersey, and you get a CCW Permit from Florida, and you come to Colorado; Colorado, even though they have reciprocity with Florida for CCW, will NOT honor your CCW permit from Florida, because you're a resident of New Jersey. Usually if a state has reciprocity with your state, and they have reciprocity with another state where you want a 2nd permit from; then those 2 states probably have reciprocity with each other. The only time getting a permit from a state you aren't a resident from is truly useful, is if your state of residence doesn't give a permit for CCW, or it's too restrictive, and you travel to many other states. Then the permit from the other state could be used. But again, it also matters what state you're visiting. Some states require that the permit you have is from the state you are a resident of, or they won't recognize your CCW permit as being legit.

zoom6zoom
June 14, 2009, 02:35 PM
Iowa is a "may issue" state, it's totally at the discretion of your local sheriff; if he's opposed to issuing them you're sunk. Non-resident permits are virtually non-existent. They do not honor permits from any other states. On the plus side, you only have to be 18 to apply.
http://www.handgunlaw.us/states/iowa.pdf

megatronrules
June 16, 2009, 07:59 PM
missouri dave whats your friend's state of residence? If its Iowa then he can simply apply for a non resident carry permit from Florida to cover him when he goes there. He could also apply for his home state permit in Iowa assuming this is his home state.

missouri dave
June 16, 2009, 09:04 PM
He owns homes in both states and pretty much splits his time between them. Is it possible for him to have a RESIDENT permit in both states?

Quiet
June 16, 2009, 10:25 PM
He owns homes in both states and pretty much splits his time between them. Is it possible for him to have a RESIDENT permit in both states?

Federal law, read example #2...

27 CFR 478.11
State of residence.
The State in which an individual resides. An individual resides in a State if he or she is present in a State with the intention of making a home in that State. If an individual is on active duty as a member of the Armed Forces, the individual's State of residence is the State in which his or her permanent duty station is located. An alien who is legally in the United States shall be considered to be a resident of a State only if the alien is residing in the State and has resided in the State for a period of at least 90 days prior to the date of sale or delivery of a firearm. The following are examples that illustrate this definition:

Example 1. A maintains a home in State X. A travels to State Y on a hunting, fishing, business, or other type of trip. A does not become a resident of State Y by reason of such trip.

Example 2. A is a U.S. citizen and maintains a home in State X and a home in State Y. A resides in State X except for weekends or the summer months of the year and in State Y for the weekends or the summer months of the year. During the time that A actually resides in State X, A is a resident of State X, and during the time that A actually resides in State Y, A is a resident of State Y.

Example 3. A, an alien, travels on vacation or on a business trip to State X. Regardless of the length of time A spends in State X, A does not have a State of residence in State X. This is because A does not have a home in State X at which he has resided for at least 90 days.

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