If you shot a bullet in outer space, would it travel forever?


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tamaneko
July 3, 2009, 06:21 AM
Since there is no friction or air resistance in outer space, does that mean that if you fire a bullet in outer space, it will just keep on travelling indefinitely as long as it doesn't hit anything else out there in the vacuum or get caught up in the gravity of a star?

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RDak
July 3, 2009, 06:32 AM
It would stop eventually. There is no such thing as a perpetual motion machine. :D

Seriously though, there is a little "friction" in outer space."

ETA: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_there_friction_in_outer_space

Glockman17366
July 3, 2009, 06:42 AM
Space isn't a complete vacumm, so the projectile would eventually stop.
If fired within the Solar System, it would probably be captured by the gravity of the sun or one of the planets.

Outside the Solar System, it might travel for years...

Shung
July 3, 2009, 06:54 AM
you would travel the other direction for a while ;)

divemedic
July 3, 2009, 07:12 AM
The escape velocity of the solar system is over 138,000 fps (42.1 km/s), so the bullet is not leaving the solar system. It would actually not be moving very fast in spatial terms. To escape earth entirely, you would have to be moving at 1.2 km/s. Since bullets travel at about 1 km/s, you are not gonna go for long.

you would travel the other direction for a while

In space, you could pick up more speed by spraying an air hose connected to a tank of air than you could by firing a bullet. Even though you are "weightless" you still have inertia and still have the same mass.

armoredman
July 3, 2009, 08:18 AM
Even if given escape velocity from the solar syatem, gravitational attraction would cause it to impact something eventually. I am not a scientist/astronomer, nor do I play one on TV.
:)

ChaoSS
July 3, 2009, 08:41 AM
Most likely, it would eventually fall within the gravitational pull of some star. However, you asked a theoretical question, so here goes.

If there were truly no friction, and ifit were fired from a spot where it was not significantly affected by any gravitational fields, and ifit were fired in a direction where it would never enter any gravitational fields, then yes, it would travel forever.

atomd
July 3, 2009, 08:43 AM
But would anyone hear it?

ChaoSS
July 3, 2009, 08:53 AM
No, the real question is would you be breaking any local ordinances on discharging a firearm.

Cannonball888
July 3, 2009, 09:33 AM
It would be destroyed as soon as it crossed the Romulan Neutral Zone.

everallm
July 3, 2009, 11:24 AM
Divemedic you missed a digit, initial vertical escape velocity from Earth is not 1.2 km/s but 11.2 km/s.

This does decrease as you reach greater altitude so if you were already in orbit at say 9,000 km the vertical escape velocity is down to a mere 7.1 km/s

If fired from orbit, unless you reach the escape velocity all that will happen is you will boost to a higher or lower orbit, depending on which direction you fire in (increasing or decreasing your current orbital velocity).

Theoretically, and assuming you were firing from and using various of of the (relatively) neutral gravitational points (Lagrange points) and using multiple planetary gravitational slingshots you could eventually reach solar escape velocity. It is however unlikely the bullet would survive passing through the Heliopause and solar bow shock.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interplanetary_Transport_Network

Ratshooter
July 3, 2009, 11:32 AM
The real question is if you fired a mini-14 in outer space would the ejected brass travel forever? I believe it would.

dullh
July 3, 2009, 11:45 AM
It would stay in motion until something stopped it. Whatever that is who knows.

At least that's what a guy called Isaac Newton said. I think he has a website...

jerkface11
July 3, 2009, 11:48 AM
If you're just firing into the void you can't be sure of your backstop.

PT1911
July 3, 2009, 11:57 AM
it would stay in motion until captured by the gravitational field of another object. That object could be a planet, moon, star, meteor, or any other cosmic debris.... until such a thing took place, it would stay in motion indefinitely.

the question was not whether or not you would be able to break the atmosphere or get out of the solar system... only what would happen.. if it did nothing but circle the solar system as many objects do, it would still remain in constant motion.

larry_minn
July 3, 2009, 12:11 PM
Does anyone else remember the longest golf drive in history? (yes this is on topic) :) Kinda,,, Sorta.....


I am sorry to say I forget which astranaut did it. :( but he did a drive on the moon. It did NOT escape the gravity of the moon but went for a LONG ways. (miles and miles)

PT1911
July 3, 2009, 12:15 PM
I am sorry to say I forget which astranaut did it. but he did a drive on the moon. It did NOT escape the gravity of the moon but went for a LONG ways. (miles and miles)

If you shot a bullet in outer space

good point but the golf ball was being driven from a large mass with a gravitational pull.. if you were free from such a mass... IE OUTER SPACE... there would be no gravity to restrict its movement... until it strayed close enough to one such item and was pulled to its surface...

DeepSouth
July 3, 2009, 12:24 PM
I have heard that some astronauts carry a .45 in case they have to hurry back to the ship on a space walk while they are a long distance away, the recoil will push them back pretty fast. Have also heard the projectile stays in place and the gun/astronaut goes back. Personally it is not really something I think is true but "I have heard" it.

Mal H
July 3, 2009, 12:29 PM
"Does anyone else remember the longest golf drive in history? ... I forget which astranaut did it."

It was Alan Shepherd. He was an avid golfer as well as an astronaut. IIRC, he took a shortened shaft 5 iron. I doubt the ball went miles and miles. On earth he would have been lucky to get 100 yards out of the shot due to the club he used and the space suit hendering his swing. Maybe he got 600 to 700 yards out of it, but if it hit rock on the way down, he probably got some good distance from the bounce.

For the bullet in space question, it's been answered well. Even in intergalactic space (the emptiest space there is), there are several atoms per cubic meter (usually hydrogen). It would go a long, long distance - many light years distance probably, and many millions of actual years, but it would eventually stop. However, even the term "stop" is relative in space. Stopped in relation to what? Even before the bullet was fired it was traveling at a tremendous speed relative to the sun, for example.

V.Oller
July 3, 2009, 12:36 PM
What about "every action has and equal and opposite reaction"? The shooter, even tho of more mass the than the firearm, would still be "moved" from recoil.

Wouldn't the firearm have to anchored to something of substantial mass in order to get full velocity and not lose some in the initial firing?

LibShooter
July 3, 2009, 12:45 PM
Nothing ever "stops" in space. If you fired the bullet anywhere near the solar system it would take up an orbit around the sun, a planet or moon.

Assuming you were far enough from the sun or any star to achieve escape velocity the bullet would wind up in orbit around the galaxy. Outside the galaxy it would orbit the center of mass of the "local group." There's always something out there to orbit.

Anyway, "stop" really has no meaning. The bullet sitting on your dresser may be at rest in relation to you, the dresser and the Earth but the entire bullet-Earth-tamaneko system is spinning at hundreds of MPH, and circling the sun even faster.

So it will never "stop."

natman
July 3, 2009, 12:48 PM
I'm pleasantly surprised no one has brought up the erroneous "there's no air in space so the powder wouldn't burn" objection yet, because someone usually does.

Yes, if the bullet was fired in space it would travel at muzzle velocity until it hit something or ran into a gravity source. If it were fired while in orbit it would be subject to orbital mechanics, but in orbit is a very special case. Most of space is a vast emptiness and while the bullet might eventually hit something, in all likelihood it would travel at its original velocity for a long time. If you are going to wait for the friction caused by space being an imperfect vacuum to slow it down, then you'll be waiting for a very long time.

1858rem
July 3, 2009, 12:48 PM
solar winds would push it around a little i guess

ar10
July 3, 2009, 01:07 PM
Does anyone else remember the longest golf drive in history? (yes this is on topic) Kinda,,, Sorta.....

I do, on Earth anyway, I believe it was in the early 70's by a professional gambler. The bet was that he could drive a golf ball for a mile. He went up to Lake Erie in the middle of winter while most of Erie was frozen over. They never did find the ball and he won the bet.
Ok, now back on topic. Yes bullets require oxygen, It was proven when they had to fire "Vera" through a space suit during one of the "Fire Fly" episodes. :D:D:D:D:D:D:D

Mal H
July 3, 2009, 01:33 PM
Wouldn't the firearm have to anchored to something of substantial mass in order to get full velocity and not lose some in the initial firing?No more so than on earth. It's the mass that counts, not the gravity acting on that mass. You would be hard pressed to measure any difference in muzzle velocity on earth vs in space using a conventional chronograph (assuming you can measure it before it went any appreciable distance in air). A big difference, of course, is that the muzzle velocity would remain fairly constant in space no matter how far away from the muzzle you were.

Big_E
July 3, 2009, 02:37 PM
This would give a new meaning to long distance shooting. Imagine taking shots galaxies away! Now, to mount a space telescope onto my rifle....

Matrix187
July 3, 2009, 03:39 PM
The question is: If you shot a .700 Nitro express in space would you travel forever? :neener:

GEM
July 3, 2009, 04:01 PM
Not to be too Geeky but in Green Lantern - they used their rings to construct interstellar distance sniper rifles. :rolleyes:

What if your bullet is our first message to another civilization and they see it is a hollow point and get mad and send giant robots to destroy us and you have to save the world and get to kiss Megan Fox?

bigalexe
July 3, 2009, 04:11 PM
Ok what you've asked its: Will an object subjected to a force in the theoretical vacuum of empty space ever come to a stop?

In theory since space is a vacuum, there is no friction and nothing to stop it. In reality space is a near-vacuum, its about as close as you can get without being one. So in reality there is an infinitesimally small amount of friction which would take an infinitesimally long time to slow and stop an object. However space doesnt just have general friction it has asteroids, planets, stars, comets, and possibly Aliens like Predator or E.T. So the chances are that somewhere that bullet would hit one of those objects either by flying straight into it or it would get caught in its gravity and slowly orbit into it. At that point we could call the bullet stopped, BUT WAIT THERE'S MORE! Most of those objects are what we would consider moving themselves, Comets, Asteroids, and Planets tend to orbit starts, and stars orbit in galaxies, and sometimes orbit black holes. Also sometimes E.T. flies around in space ships looking for people to abduct. So the bullet stopped but is still technically in motion albeit not on its own.

Its a very long explanation: Short Answer is Yes a bullet will stop but who knows when or where?

AWorthyOpponent
July 3, 2009, 04:12 PM
bullet would never fire. There is no oxygen to ignite the gun powder. You'd have to make some kind of special gun powder that used different combustables or a sealed system to fire it...

Cannonball888
July 3, 2009, 04:16 PM
bullet would never fire. There is no oxygen to ignite the gun powder.
Nope. Gunpowder supplies it's own oxygen. Just watch Glocks being shot underwater on YouTube.

1858rem
July 3, 2009, 04:16 PM
you dont need oxygen for the bullet to fire, it(the powder,primer) has its own fuel and oxidizers

Mal H
July 3, 2009, 04:45 PM
bullet would never fire. There is no oxygen to ignite the gun powder.Better late than never, eh natman?
:D

theotherwaldo
July 3, 2009, 05:37 PM
The bullet or it's constituent atoms would continue to travel. It's vectors would change often, of course, but it would continue in motion.

Just like all of the other matter in the universe.

bigione
July 3, 2009, 05:47 PM
I wonder if you would get a limp wrist effect?

ants
July 3, 2009, 06:56 PM
Well, it's true that outer space is not a perfect vacuum.
But what if you could discharge a suitable test projectile inside a politician's head?
Wouldn't that one travel forever without hitting anything? :p:neener::p

Blackbeard
July 3, 2009, 07:29 PM
Nothing ever stops in space, because the word "stop" has no meaning. All motion is relative. On Earth we describe motion in relation to the Earth, and "stopped" only means it is travelling on the same vector as the portion of the Earth that it is on. Suppose you pull the bullet out and just release it in deep space. Is it moving? Relative to you, it isn't moving. But relative to the planet that just flew by, it is moving.

Basically the bullet you fire and the one you just let go will have the same fate. They will exist until they get sucked into a star and vaporized at some point.

divemedic
July 3, 2009, 07:57 PM
Divemedic you missed a digit, initial vertical escape velocity from Earth is not 1.2 km/s but 11.2 km/s.

Stupid cheap replacement keyboard keeps missing letters and numbers. My old one broke, and I am currently using a cheap Nexxtech, because I have been too lazy to go buy a new one.

JCisHe
July 3, 2009, 08:00 PM
Yeah...

Satch
July 3, 2009, 08:00 PM
As far as time is relevent to us a bullet fired off into space would travel to the end of time compared to our time on this planet and in the Universe. The chances of the bullet hitting anything out there is almost nil since Astronomers tell us that space with all that is in it is almost 99% empty.

Nate1778
July 3, 2009, 08:06 PM
Look I have watched enough space movies to know a gun won't do the trick. One must posses a Galaxycon Thermoplamsa ray gun to shoot something in outer space. Of coarse it would not be able to penetrate a GX 2000 force field generator, so what does it matter. You guys are such nerds............:neener:

Hk91-762mm
July 3, 2009, 09:05 PM
It would stay in motion until something stopped it. Whatever that is who knows.

At least that's what a guy called Isaac Newton said. I think he has a website...


=====>>>>>>>Post of the day !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Grizfire
July 3, 2009, 09:37 PM
Again to reiterate others, there is no such thing as "stop" in space.

You don't need O2 outside the round, the combustion occurs inside the casing as there is oxygen inside the casing because you would have had to load it on earth. Which makes me wonder, since there is gas inside with some pressure inside the casing, and there is no pressure in space, wouldn't the gas inside expand and push the bullet out anyway??

which brings me to the real question, what would happen if you jumped out of a space ship naked?

I think you would first immediately freeze solid, then explode.

Flyboy
July 3, 2009, 10:11 PM
A) Yes, it would fire. Gunpowder--like most explosives and conflagrants--is composed of many compounds, including nitrates. The nitrate ion, NO3 (-1) carries three oxygen atoms to donate to the combustion reaction. It's not the oxygen gas inside the casing--the gaseous contents are truly trivial in the scope of things--but rather the oxygen stored chemically in the compounds (called "oxidizers" for a reason).

B) Ignoring the question of how we define "stop" (what's our frame of reference--Special relativity says there's no such thing as an absolute reference frame, so you can't say "it's not moving" as an absolute, just "not moving relative to x"), the bullet would ultimately end up in the sun if it didn't achieve Solar escape velocity (discussed above). The bullet would orbit the sun for a long time, but it would lose a minuscule (barely measurable) amount of energy each time it collided with a stray hydrogen molecule. Each collision would cause a degradation in the bullet's orbit (again, barely measurable, if at all), but the cumulative effect over an unknown period of time (decades? Centuries? Millenia? Longer?) would ultimately result in the orbit collapsing into the sun--unless, of course, the bullet collided with another body first.

If somehow the bullet did achieve escape velocity, it would continue into deep space, again being minutely deflected by each collision with a random atom or molecule. Ultimately, it would be captured by another body's gravity (based on the fact that space has a nearly-limitless number of stars, probability suggests that gravitational capture would happen eventually), resulting in the same scenario as in our own system, just a whole lot later.

Of course, during the countless aeons, the metal of the bullet would sublimate from the surface. It happens here on Earth, too, but what's a few thousand atoms per year? De nada, until you start talking millions or billions of years. If somehow the shot managed to avoid gravitational capture long enough, it might just evaporate into the imperfect vacuum of space, becoming one of those "several atoms per cubic meter."

How long do you want to wait for an answer?

yeti
July 4, 2009, 02:54 AM
If it were I, in space, trying to fire that gun, something already has gone horribly wrong, and I would forget to snick off the safety, the bullet would go nowhere.

Kind of Blued
July 4, 2009, 04:02 AM
I'm having a hard time understanding (or agreeing with) the notion that precise location cannot exist in space. The galaxy is expanding, or moving about, but is it possible for an object (a bullet) to *not* be in motion in space?

I don't see why not... :confused:

evan price
July 4, 2009, 06:28 AM
Blued, "motion" is a relative term- motion compared to what? Since the entire universe is moving, there's no fixed reference point to define as "stopped" to compare.

The bullet would eventually "stop"- It would eventually be attracted to a strong gravitational pull and be pulled into the gravity well of a star or planet.

I guess the REAL question is, what if you were travelling .999999 of the speed of light, and then fired that gun in your direction of travel. What would happen?

Aw4g63
July 4, 2009, 08:07 AM
This is by far the best thread in the history of gun forums. It's a perfect display of everyone's strong knowledge of everything.

My favorite one so far was:


I have heard that some astronauts carry a .45 in case they have to hurry back to the ship on a space walk while they are a long distance away, the recoil will push them back pretty fast. Have also heard the projectile stays in place and the gun/astronaut goes back. Personally it is not really something I think is true but "I have heard" it.

bluetopper
July 4, 2009, 10:31 AM
Since reading this thread one of my goals in life has become to actually try this.

natman
July 4, 2009, 10:51 AM
I'm pleasantly surprised no one has brought up the erroneous "there's no air in space so the powder wouldn't burn" objection yet, because someone usually does.

The bullet would never fire. There is no oxygen to ignite the gun powder. You'd have to make some kind of special gun powder that used different combustables or a sealed system to fire it...

Better late than never, eh natman?

Even when you try to preempt it, you can't stop it. I stand corrected:

"I'm amazed no one has brought up the erroneous "there's no air in space so the powder wouldn't burn" objection yet, because someone always does." :banghead:

natman
July 4, 2009, 11:32 AM
Just to put things in perspective, space is a HUGE emptiness, sprinkled very, very lightly with stars. The nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centuri, is 4.3 light years away. That's 5.88 trillion miles away. If you fired a pistol bullet in space it would take just under a million years to cover the distance. That's assuming you fired with the proper swing and lead, of course. ;)

So with trillions of miles between stars, it would be easy for a bullet to travel for eons without coming within sniffing distance of anything. The odds of running into something are literally astronomical.

Glockman17366
July 4, 2009, 12:20 PM
There must be a lot of emptiness somewhere, because we managed to get 51 posts (52, including this one) out a really idle question.

jerkface11
July 4, 2009, 12:32 PM
You'd have to make some kind of special gun powder I think some guy named Nobel invented something that would work. We just need to make powder out of it.

Tommygunn
July 4, 2009, 12:46 PM
I guess the REAL question is, what if you were travelling .999999 of the speed of light, and then fired that gun in your direction of travel. What would happen?

Are you thinking, perhaps, the bullet will reach 1.000001 lightspeed, or c?
It won't. Thou shall not add one's own speed to that of a projectile when discussing Quantum light physics.

Astronomer Carl Sagan actually came up with a thought experiment to show this:
A bicyclist is riding along a road in a direction pretty much straight toward an observer. On a side road perpendicular to the path of the cyclist, a truck comes along, and unfortunatly, collides with the cyclist. The observer witnesses the collision exactly as it appears from his point in reality.
IF it were proper to add one's speed to lightspeed, the light from the cyclist would arrive at the observer first and he'd see the cyclist tumble off and get mauled, then the truck would arrive at the collision point.
BUT, we all know we don't see things like that!

So unfortunatly, even if you could travel .999999 c nothing you did could propel the bullet faster than light itself. BTW, at that speed, your mass would have become incredible! Mass actually increases as you approach lightspeed.

benEzra
July 4, 2009, 01:22 PM
So unfortunatly, even if you could travel .999999 c nothing you did could propel the bullet faster than light itself. BTW, at that speed, your mass would have become incredible! Mass actually increases as you approach lightspeed.
Your mass as perceived by an outside observer. You would see yourself as having normal mass, and your stationary surroundings affected by Lorentz transformations.

Lorentz gamma for a speed of .999999 c (983,570,073 ft/sec, I heard J.D. Jones has a wildcat .17 that approaches that speed :D) is a little over 700, meaning your mass as perceived by an outside observer would just over 700 times normal.

FWIW, a 55-grain .223 bullet at .999999 c would have a muzzle energy of 118,124,382,940,567 ft-lb or 38.25 kilotons of TNT (160,155 GJ), which is between two and three times the energy of the Hiroshima bomb.

And to address the OP, if you were able to travel out into intergalactic space before shooting the gun, and aimed it away from any superclusters in the line of sight, it would probably never hit anything, ever, due to continued expansion of the universe over the time scales involved.

GEM
July 4, 2009, 01:48 PM
Since this is a silly thread - let me hijack by adding something about the movement of the galaxies, etc.

Ever wonder about time machines - if you went back 100 years, just in time - you would be floating in space. Oops. I once read a story about that. The time dude popped out in space but had enough sense to hit the return button before dying.

OKIE2
July 4, 2009, 01:54 PM
Can I add a little different question
If it is about 23,000 miles around the earth and we travel that far in 24 hours.
We are really going 958.3 miles an hour. A catagory 5 tornado only reaches about 350 miles an hour. Why don't we have 958.3 mph winds. So how many feet per second is a bullet really going if you shoot it to the east at 3,000 FPS?

Mal H
July 4, 2009, 02:07 PM
natman - you need to recalibrate your calculator. :)

It is roughly 25 trillion miles to Proxima Centauri. Even if an object could escape the sun's gravity (a bullet ain't gonna do it), it still needs to navigate through the Kuiper belts and Oort clouds of both stars, and there's a lot of trash and garbage in there to deflect it.

redneck2
July 4, 2009, 02:09 PM
I wonder if you would get a limp wrist effect?
Only if the shooter was from San Francisco
FWIW, a 55-grain .223 bullet at .999999 c would have a muzzle energy of 118,124,382,940,567 ft-lb or 38.25 kilotons of TNT (160,155 GJ), which is between two and three times the energy of the Hiroshima bomb.
Think what that would do to a prairie dog

OKIE2
July 4, 2009, 02:29 PM
a 55-grain .223 bullet at .999999 c would have a muzzle energy of 118,124,382,940,567 ft-lb or 38.25 kilotons of TNT (160,155 GJ), which is between two and three times the energy of the Hiroshima bomb.

Think what that would do to a prairie dog

using them numbers it would blow a guys head plum off if you just spit in his face
would Obama out law water so you couldn't spit

crazy-mp
July 4, 2009, 03:41 PM
All this talk about space and nobody mentioned the wormhole? All you have to do find a wormhole in space fire into that and the bullet will come out some other place in outer space, everybody knows that. :rolleyes:

Tommygunn
July 4, 2009, 07:17 PM
Your mass as perceived by an outside observer. You would see yourself as having normal mass, and your stationary surroundings affected by Lorentz transformations.


Yes of course, that's why it's RELATIVE.(Theory of relativity). But you'd still have an ever-increasingly difficult time accelerating the closer you get to lightspeed.:rolleyes:

Grey_Mana
July 4, 2009, 07:32 PM
I actually did this with a 22lr 80 trillion years ago; the bullet is still going. If you pm me, I'll give you an update every million years or so.

Mal H
July 4, 2009, 08:00 PM
Grey_Mana - how was the trip through the Big Bang? Exciting, I'll bet! ;)

That amount of time is a little less than 6 times the age of the universe.

krmgator
July 4, 2009, 10:03 PM
If you shot a bullet in outer space, would it travel forever?

Answer: Yes

natman
July 5, 2009, 04:18 AM
natman - you need to recalibrate your calculator.

It is roughly 25 trillion miles to Proxima Centauri. Even if an object could escape the sun's gravity (a bullet ain't gonna do it), it still needs to navigate through the Kuiper belts and Oort clouds of both stars, and there's a lot of trash and garbage in there to deflect it.

Good catch. 5.88 trillion miles is one light year, not the 4.3 light years to Proxima Centauri. So it would take about four million years to cover the distance, not one.

Yes, a bullet would not escape the sun's gravity. The point I was trying to make is just how vast space is by showing how long it would take to cover the distance involved, not that you could actually shoot a pistol from the solar system to Proxima Centuri.

Ogreon
July 5, 2009, 05:57 AM
If you managed to exceed the speed of light and then fired the bullet...It would, inevitably, travel backward in time and kill your grandfather. The temporal paradox would cause the entire universe to cease existence. You would then become the greatest mass murderer ever.

benEzra
July 5, 2009, 03:10 PM
But you'd still have an ever-increasingly difficult time accelerating the closer you get to lightspeed.
Not from your own perspective; again, only from the perspective of an outside observer. If you started out accelerating at, say 10 m/s^2, you would continue to measure yourself accelerating at a constant 10 m/s^2 no matter how close you were to the speed of light. If you fired a .223 in the direction you were traveling while going .999999c, you'd chronograph the bullet at ~3100 ft/sec just as if you were at rest.

What would be happening from the perspective of an outside observer, though, is that your seconds would be getting progressively longer, and your meters would be getting progressively shorter. So you are still measuring an acceleration of 10 m/s^2 and your gun's muzzle velocity still chrony's 3100 ft/s, BUT it takes nearly 12 minutes (from the at-rest observer's perspective) for your stopwatch to tick each of those seconds, and your meter stick is only 1.4mm long from the observer's perspective. And the closer you get to c, the longer each second takes and the shorter the meter stick gets, as seen from the outside. But you'd see/feel nothing out of the ordinary as long as you didn't look out the window, and nothing in your ship would be foreshortened or running slow as seen by you.

Tommygunn
July 5, 2009, 06:44 PM
Okay okay ... I'm getting conflicting reports ...James Kirk says one thing and Steve Zodiac another.:eek: This whole relativity thing always boffled me ... it's amazing someone (Einstein) could think of this who couldn't even figure out how to use a comb!!!!!!:neener::neener:

:o:o

Furncliff
July 5, 2009, 06:53 PM
"outer space" is not empty. Wiki Dark Matter and Dark Energy. Your bullet will be assimilated. Resistance is futile.

benEzra
July 5, 2009, 07:05 PM
Okay okay ... I'm getting conflicting reports ...James Kirk says one thing and Steve Zodiac another. This whole relativity thing always boffled me ... it's amazing someone (Einstein) could think of this who couldn't even figure out how to use a comb!!!!!!
LOL. And the rabbit hole gets deeper than that, once you get into quantum physics. If you put two particles into an entangled quantum state, send one of them halfway across the universe, and then measure the quantum state of the local one, the quantum state of the one halfway across the universe changes instantly with no time delay. And if a barrier is sufficiently thin, a particle can exist on both sides of the barrier at the same time, or pop from one side of the barrier to the other without physically penetrating it....

I think maybe God made physics to keep us humble. :D

w_houle
July 5, 2009, 07:11 PM
think maybe God made physics to keep us humble
Yes, but could God make a gun more accurate than he is?

jim in Anchorage
July 5, 2009, 07:20 PM
I think maybe God made physics to keep us humble.
God doesn't play dice! Einstein refuting quantum theory.

feedthehogs
July 5, 2009, 07:24 PM
The real question is if you fired a mini-14 in outer space would the ejected brass travel forever

No the question is if you fired a mini 14 in outer space would you have a better chance of hitting what you aim at than here on earth.:neener:

Lou McGopher
July 5, 2009, 11:35 PM
It may travel forever, but eventually someone would return fire with photon torpedoes.

TimRB
July 6, 2009, 01:50 AM
A bullet sitting in a box on a shelf is already is motion, and will remain in motion forever or until it is no longer a bullet, whichever comes first. And personally, I never cared one way or the other whether the damn cat was dead.

Tim

Funderb
July 6, 2009, 01:56 AM
it would be destroyed as soon as it crossed the romulan neutral zone.


hahahahaha!

natman
July 6, 2009, 04:09 AM
No the question is if you fired a mini 14 in outer space would you have a better chance of hitting what you aim at than here on earth.

Yes, if you fired a mini 14 in space you would stand an excellent chance of hitting space. :D

icupro
July 6, 2009, 07:28 AM
Analyzing your question.....you would first have to be in space, the outer envelope of the trophosphere (higher than the flight ceiling of an SR-71 Blackbird). So, until you can get away from the earth's gravitational pull and then launch your bullet, its not a very practical question. Do you know any Nobel winning phycists? They probably could give you better insight into you dilemma.......

w_houle
July 6, 2009, 01:15 PM
Does anyone have a reasonable explanation as to why Vera needed to be put in a space suit to fire?

Mal H
July 6, 2009, 06:46 PM
Poor script writing and a stupid technical adviser?

CoRoMo
July 6, 2009, 06:57 PM
What caliber for outer space?

XTerminator
July 6, 2009, 09:36 PM
Which would be better for space, AR-15 or AK-47?

:neener:

Steve

Aw4g63
July 6, 2009, 10:23 PM
All this talk about space and nobody mentioned the wormhole? All you have to do find a wormhole in space fire into that and the bullet will come out some other place in outer space, everybody knows that.


Sounds like you just figured out JFK's shooters position.

Madcap_Magician
July 7, 2009, 11:04 AM
You wouldn't fire a bullet into outer space because you wouldn't be following Colonel Cooper's rules, and he would smite you from the grave.

Mal H
July 7, 2009, 11:21 AM
Looks like we've reached the end of the discussion. But, don't worry, the same or a similar question will be posted in about 6 months, regular as clockwork. :)

Closed.

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