9 mm FMJ Point Blank Gunshot Wound (Warning - GRAPHIC PICS!!)


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kda
July 3, 2009, 11:52 PM
Not to let "acceptableusername" (see his post below) be the only one to admit to some serious lapses of attention .. I decided to share my accident from a couple months ago. Glock 19.

I was "sure" I had cleared it. Clip was removed and empty on the table. I reached across the table aiming at the wall to drop the hammer so I could complete disassembly and was resting my left hand on top of the slide, slightly forward such that (apparently) the edge of my palm was down in front of the muzzle.

The huge loss of skin must have been from the muzzle blast. Well, the pictures speak for themselves. The wound is now closed and looks pretty good, but the nerves have not completed healing and the hand surgeon says it will be another two months before my hand and little finger feel normal again.

I share, hoping that my experience will help others realize that no matter how old you are and how many years of experience you have, it just takes a momentary lapse of concentration to do stuff like this ... or worse.

Like I told my understanding wife ... nothing anyone can say will teach me anything more than I learned the hard way. But fire away if you must. I am just hoping this helps someone else learn / re-learn the easy way ... never let anything or anyone make you lose your concentration and focus.

And no I don't blame the Glock. This is MY fault and my fault alone. The Glock is not a hard weapon to clear.

Link to first image. Warning: Graphic (http://lh5.ggpht.com/_o4ugbklqmno/Sk7MBp24Q3I/AAAAAAAAARk/7sfRFlrb9lA/s800/Wound%20Entry%20Macro%20328%20.jpg)

Link to second image. Warning: Graphic (http://lh4.ggpht.com/_o4ugbklqmno/Sk7MCDmxsLI/AAAAAAAAARo/IPOAcuBZ5TI/s800/Wound%20Exit%20Macro%20%20332%20.jpg)

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kendradad
July 3, 2009, 11:55 PM
WOW. thanks for sharing.

tydephan
July 4, 2009, 12:02 AM
Whew. Great reminder.

Indeed, thanks for sharing. Hope you get some feeling back soon!

Towboater
July 4, 2009, 12:03 AM
Dang, that looms like it stings a bit....
As much as I hear about flocks being good guns and easy to strip and all I find it curious that both posts involved them and in the same way. Don't know myself as they have just never felt right in my hand. Thanks for passing on what is an expierience you would rather not relive for the sake of others. I know that has always been a huge concern and fear of mine. Good to be reminded that it can happen to the best of us if we let our guard down.

freakshow10mm
July 4, 2009, 12:10 AM
In general when these things happen:

Complacency is a contributing factor to a lot of mishaps. Safety is a mindset.

Lesson learned. Everyone is going to have a mishap of some form or another. Some worse than others. I'm glad for you that was the only damage. Pain and associated costs aside, I'm glad that's all that happened.

CountGlockula
July 4, 2009, 12:29 AM
Thanks for the visual.:)

AcceptableUserName
July 4, 2009, 12:38 AM
Wow. Ouch. Wow

NC-Mike
July 4, 2009, 12:46 AM
You boys better be more careful out there...

Please

onlymeself
July 4, 2009, 12:57 AM
wow. Sorry for your pain, and thanks for posting. I always show my kids these injuries so that they can see what a bullet will do, and to hopefully show them you have to take extra precautions.
Thanks again for posting, and I wish you a total and speedy recovery.

fireman 9731
July 4, 2009, 12:58 AM
Good thing it wasn't a .45:neener:

doc2rn
July 4, 2009, 01:13 AM
This is why I dont shoot my Glock that much, you have to pull the trigger to disassemble it for cleaning. The moron who thought that up should be drawn and quartered!

DasFriek
July 4, 2009, 01:21 AM
Im actually very set on only having guns with manual safteys,and niether your case nor "acceptableusername" would have benifited from one.Its the only issue i have with Glocks.Hopefully i learned my lesson a few months back while i was working on a neck knife and it slipped out of the sheath and only kept from taking my finger fully off if it hadnt hit the bone and stopped.Still dont have feeling on one side.
But im glad your ok to learn from this,many wont get that chance.

hso
July 4, 2009, 01:22 AM
Thanks for letting people know that these things do happen and that they are preventable.

Perhaps folks will take the safety rules to heart more and not treat something so familiar so casually they they get badly bitten.

Forklift352
July 4, 2009, 01:24 AM
Sweet Pics......Thank you for sharing your "accident." I hope you heal up real soon.
I think with these resent posts will help....I know they help me.When I pick up
a gun I first think of the pics.....Then I focus.:)

rogdigity
July 4, 2009, 01:27 AM
dont feel dumb. when i was little i stuck a fork in the toaster right after my mom told me not too. i dont have many of these 'moments' and i hope non of you do either, but these kind of moments make us remember how smart we are the rest of the time and help us learn. in fact, i would lay money on it that you never do this again, and because you posted this im 100% certain that at least one person who sees this will think twice someday and prevent this from happening.

thanks for sharing

peyton
July 4, 2009, 01:28 AM
Thanks for sharing, it will certainly remind me to double check. Now having said that I will share that my Father in law got a new closet of closes. The over and under shotgun I was examining had an empty upper chamber, I did not spread it wide enough to check the lower barrel. I closed it, pulled trigger and bang. Twelve gauge at 1 yard, through the hall door through 2 sheets of sheet rock, through 4 feet of clothes hanging up and it freckled the opposite closet side sheet rock.

Boba Fett
July 4, 2009, 03:50 AM
This is why I dont shoot my Glock that much, you have to pull the trigger to disassemble it for cleaning. The moron who thought that up should be drawn and quartered!


This was mentioned by several people on the thread with the THR member who shot himself with a .45 Glock.

So, to summarize what I said in that thread, there are a number of other firearms that operate the same way, and even though I am not a fan of Glock, I just don't see how pulling the trigger on a loaded firearm you didn't check is the firearm's fault. :scrutiny:

Master<>Blaster
July 4, 2009, 03:54 AM
man, at least it wasn't any worse. there's a lot worse places to get shot:what:

ScareyH22A
July 4, 2009, 04:12 AM
My experienced friend advised me to get a 5 gallon bucket and fill it with sand. Then place the bucket somewhere close to where I'd work on my guns. Whenever I have to put my finger on the trigger, the muzzle is pointed at the bucket of sand. It was good advice.

Also, another friend recommended that I continually press check the chamber and be accustomed to doing it frequently because absent mindness happens to everyone.

OP, good luck with your recovery.

MovedWest
July 4, 2009, 04:19 AM
Man, you are going to have one wicked drinking story once that thing heals! Ouch... wow... dang. Good luck and hope there's no major permanent damage.

One word: Neosporin

-MW

kmrcstintn
July 4, 2009, 04:37 AM
out of curiosity (BTW: I work in a trauma hospital in the operating room as a surgical technologist)...did you miss the bone in your hand that attaches the pinky? if not, did they do a surgical repair with wires or a plate and screws?

I feel for ya...I hope you have a good recovery without complications; please be very careful in the future

yongxingfreesty
July 4, 2009, 04:39 AM
ouch, thanks for reminder! hope you get better

BHP FAN
July 4, 2009, 04:46 AM
OK,I'm headed back over to the black powder forum.Y'all scare me. Remember folks,the ''safety'' is located between the ears.

Dallas Jack
July 4, 2009, 04:52 AM
Most guns prior to the 1970s didn't even HAVE these stupid manual so called safeties.

False
Dallas Jack

cottonmouth
July 4, 2009, 05:56 AM
You could have put your eye out!!

J.B.

redneck2
July 4, 2009, 06:10 AM
Every few weeks we get a thread about concealed carry at a gun show. Somebody needs to mark this thread and re-post it then. Good example of what happens when you don't clear your weapon.

Floppy_D
July 4, 2009, 06:18 AM
Thanks for sharing, and I'm glad you're okay. There's lots of new gun owners out there, I'm hoping they catch one of these stories so it doesn't have to happen to them, too. You, sir, are a valuable training aid. :)

Aw4g63
July 4, 2009, 07:00 AM
I understand Glocks design but I must say that you damn Glock owners love shooting yourselves. lol

Shung
July 4, 2009, 07:09 AM
I have a 19C.. would have been much worse to see..

reminder: when you PULL the trigger, always do it like you are actually SHOOTING (that means to a target you are sure about) ... EVEN if you should have missed the chamber check, it would only hurt your ears..


"I must say that you damn Glock owners love shooting yourselves"

excellent ;)

Grey Morel
July 4, 2009, 07:22 AM
I noticed that all of the ND pictures iv seen so far on this forum are older men. This leads me to believe they have become complacent with their safety through long periods of handling.

Towboater
July 4, 2009, 07:37 AM
Not blaming the gun there bud , but I AM saying that it is serious design flaw. Getting kicked in the gnads is perfectly safe too as long as you wear a cup but I don't want to do it every time I change my pants. The fact is that complacency will set in on everyone sooner or later ( even the "back in my day" crowd) just a matter of time and luck. I doubt ANYONE on here doesn't have a story where they were out hunting or at the range , probably tired and broke one of the golden rules. Thing is most of us were lucky and didn't harm ourselves or even worse, someone else. You gentelmen just weren't that lucky. I have on several occasions gone to strip one of my automatics only to realize there was still a loaded magazine in. Bad feeling and just one of the many reasons I will never own a glock. The fact of the matter is that guns are like motorcycles. It is not IF you will ever have problems but WHEN and to what extent. Just my two cents.

jad0110
July 4, 2009, 07:58 AM
First off, I am glad you are okay. There is learning something the easy way, the hard way, and learning it the REALLY hard (permanent) way. I'm glad it was just the standard hard way and not worse.

"I must say that you damn Glock owners love shooting yourselves"

:D

Actually, I recall a thread on THR a year or so ago about just that same observation (stated in a slightly more PC fasion, of course ;) ).

First, there are no hard stats to back up my thoughts, just observations. Yes, seems the most common gun involved in NDs are Glocks, but it could also be because just about everyone owns one. I figured it could also be because Glocks have become so uber cool/popular, many brand new shooters are either gravitating towards them on their own or are told to get a Glock by their peers.

A common platform with perhaps a higher percentage of noob owners than say, Colt revolver owners, and I could see where you'd get a lot of NDs involving Glocks.

Disclaimer / flame retardant :o: No, I'm not saying all Glock owners are careless; just that with them being so popular that they are bound to be involved in more screw ups.

JCisHe
July 4, 2009, 08:05 AM
I own a Glock and I hate the tear down process. It's retarded to have to pull the trigger. The first thing Glock should do is redesign the tear down procedure.

Glad you are ok man! Happy Independence Day!

swright101
July 4, 2009, 08:29 AM
I appreciate you sharing that incident with the rest of us. I carry a Glock 23 so they hit home for me. Those pics gave me a sobering reminder of how dangerous even a little carelessness (and honestly, who among us can say that we haven't been at least a little careless sometime in handling a firearm? Hell, we're all human) can be. Thankfully no one else was injured. Hope your hand heals soon.

moooose102
July 4, 2009, 08:40 AM
OUCH-OUCH-OUCH-OUCH-OUCH-OUCH-OUCH!!!!! thanks for sharing though. i am going to show this to my son (8), so he gets an idea of what can happen if you are not paying attention. i hope i can keep from doing something similar. i THINK i learned my lesson about accidental discharges 20 or so years ago. i also had a concetration gap, but i was much more fortunate than you. mine was with a 357 magnum, but i had it loaded with plastic training rounds. all that happened was a dent in the drywall ceiling. but it scared the crap out of me!
as for haveing to pull the trigger to disassemble, i have a couple of guns that are the same way. it is no big deal, as long as you remember the number 1 gun safety rule. KEEP THE MUZZLE POINTED IN A SAFE DIRECTION! teach your kids this, and they, and you will enjoy many years of shooting sports fun, without incident.

JDGray
July 4, 2009, 08:58 AM
Sure hope your right handed! If not, Rosey's getting some time off:neener:

And to the people that blame Glock for this.......Your next!!!!

JMusic
July 4, 2009, 09:01 AM
I saw almost the same wound from a 380 over a domestic. wife was shot through the hand at and angle and went through one of the door windows.


Jim

Still Too Many Choices!?
July 4, 2009, 10:12 AM
They must not be teaching "The Glock Grip" any more as the sop for takedown? Four fingers on top of frame just in front of the rear sight, thumb on the back strap below the rails... Thumb pushes the direction of bullet travel, while fingers leverage backwards against the rear sight.

Still Too Many Choices!?
July 4, 2009, 10:23 AM
It looks like you used the "rookie take down method" of take firing grip with right hand, place muzzle into the meat of left hand(left hand thumb parallel and opposite the ejection port), then pushed the slide rearward while pulling the trigger, which normally leads to a "click" and the right hand thumb pushing forward on the back of the slide as the gun slides apart... But this time the"click" was followed by " boooom!!! "holy f-ing g*d!! I just shot my f-ing self!!!! :uhoh: !!!!"

Glad ur okay lesson learned, and if I'm right, please tell us, you might save someone else from a rookie mistake, by teaching the Glock Grip!

I know this is how I used to take down my Glock until someone opened my eyes to just your scenario being possible! Pulling the trigger for takedown( however contraversial) is about the most silly and strawman argument against owning an ALREADY DEADLY WEAPON As I have heard in a while! Now if it REQUIRED that you point it at some part of your body, WHILE PULLING the TRIGGER, that would be cause for action. You can't people-proof guns, just like you can't gun-proof people, you learned both lessons at once :).

Still 2 Many Choices!?

heron
July 4, 2009, 10:27 AM
Drop the mag and think it's empty?? What ever happened to "CHECK THE CHAMBER"?

Think of it this way: the gun doesn't fire from the magazine; it fires from the chamber. If you haven't cleared the chamber, you haven't cleared the gun.

Cohibra45
July 4, 2009, 10:28 AM
I noticed that all of the ND pictures iv seen so far on this forum are older men. This leads me to believe they have become complacent with their safety through long periods of handling.

Maybe they are just 'man' enough not to care about what others think when sharing their experiences??? I've noticed that the younger generation seems overly concerned about appearances and the latest and greatest. In other words, if it is shiny and new, it must be better. Also, they don't seem to take the responsibility for their actions as well as us older guys, but it could just be me having an old timers moment!!!:D:D:D I just don't think that theory (newer is better) is particularly right, but that is my opinion.

BTW, I still handle all my guns as if they are loaded all the time and teach my young son (15) the same rules.

KarenTOC
July 4, 2009, 10:36 AM
As I get older, I find that the more often I do something, the more likely I am to forget to do it. Why? Because I have a PERFECT MEMORY of having already done it. And I have done it... just - not "now." (Did I take my vitamins this morning? The ones I've been taking every morning for the last 15 years? I remember picking them up; I remember swallowing - I just can't remember if it was today or yesterday.)

I think this might be one cause of the "I could have sworn I cleared it" syndrome. You clear your gun, and you clear it again, and again, and again... and then one time you don't. And, after the accident, you can't understand why you failed to clear it this time. Well, maybe it's because you thought you did. Your memory says you did. Your memory just failed to mention that you did it an hour ago and with a different gun.

I'm not offering this as an excuse; merely as a possible reason why something so important and so automatic and so often repeated can be missed once.

Measure (clear) twice, cut (pull trigger) once?

JDoe
July 4, 2009, 10:54 AM
This is why I dont shoot my Glock that much, you have to pull the trigger to disassemble it for cleaning. The moron who thought that up should be drawn and quartered!

No dry firing practice for you then! :neener:

george29
July 4, 2009, 12:02 PM
I understand Glocks design but I must say that you damn Glock owners love shooting yourselves. lol Glock has been toted as foolproof, nothing but a trigger to be careful of. My 1905 M&P and my 1903 Colt .32 are just as foolproof, all you need to do is PROPERLY CHECK THE DAMN GUN BEFORE YOU TAKE IT APART TO CLEAN IT!

I also sent my young boys these and other pictures. Scare tactics work.

jbrown50
July 4, 2009, 12:31 PM
Thanks for having the guts to post this kda. Visual reminders are always very persuasive but as you can see by some of the posts, there are still some people out there who just don't get it:

I own a Glock and I hate the tear down process. It's retarded to have to pull the trigger. The first thing Glock should do is redesign the tear down procedure.

Keep the gun pointed in a safe direction, remove the magazine, clear the chamber, pull the trigger (while still pointed in a safe direction), pull down on both sides of the take-down lever, push the slide forward.

You never disassemble a gun with a round in the chamber, NEVER!

Before pulling the trigger on ANY GUN you're supposed to first make sure that the chamber is empty. That's the first step before pulling the trigger. The two actions go hand in hand, DUH! You ALWAYS assume that a gun is loaded and that includes a round in the chamber. You always keep a gun pointed in a safe direction while handling it and NEVER pull the trigger unless it's pointed at something that you intend to shoot or can afford destroying.

Why is complacency such a difficult word to understand?

gimlet1/21
July 4, 2009, 01:00 PM
Thanks for show and tell; I always show these posts to my sons (3) " every gun is loaded"

FlyinBryan
July 4, 2009, 01:08 PM
first of all, glad your gonna be ok.

the simple fact is that we, as humans, make stupid mistakes.

there is no firearms safety course that can completely eliminate accidental discharges. the day will never come when humans leave occasional errors behind, never to be commited again.

no person is perfect.

this is the reason for safeties on firearms.

glock fan can say "hey, how bout dont point it at anything and pull the trigger!!"

well that would certainly end the accidental discharges, and if i had wheels, id be a wagon.

i also think its retarded to pull the trigger to strip the gun (like someone above said)

counting these two recent "shot myself" threads, ive read about 4 accidental discharges in the last month, all glocks, and 5 if you count the "im the only one fessional' nuff' in this room" guy, lol, who was entrusted enough to shoot himself in a class full of little kids. (but thats another rediculous story)

it is only my opinion, but the pistol should have a safety and a means to field strip that does not require pulling the trigger.

i realize that if handled properly, this will not happen.


maybe the automotive industry should just follow glocks lead, tell people to drive correctly, and stop wasting money on seat belts and child safety seats in cars.

JCisHe
July 4, 2009, 01:36 PM
jbrown,

You're going to have an accident someday too. More than likely... the problem is the person not the weapon and some weapons make it easier. That's what you don't seem to understand.

Regards,
Beau

p85
July 4, 2009, 01:43 PM
hope that heals soon. as many have said, the best safety is between your ears.
I know that you will take some ribbing from this but I give you a lot of credit sharing this for everyone else to learn from.
I cringe when I see someone posting about their new "toy". they aren't toys and never should be treated as such.
again, thanks for sharing.

dullh
July 4, 2009, 01:45 PM
"You're going to have an accident someday too."

Wrong.

Ignoring or violating safety rules causes this. Don't blame the gun, the design, the lack of external safety, the tide, the day of the week...not everybody who handles guns will end up shooting themselves. That's only a "given" if you're a careless idiot, in which case you should swear off guns altogether before you kill yourself or somebody else.

I guess everybody wants to be sympathetic and/or make excuses for this but the fact is it did not have to happen. And it won't happen to me. Period.

Funderb
July 4, 2009, 01:47 PM
You're an idiot.
haha!
Just kidding! You are NOT an idiot, you just made a mistake that is easy to make.
Sorry about your hand, brotha. I hope you heal well, and thanks a lot for the important reminder.

gbran
July 4, 2009, 01:49 PM
I still feel comfortable with my Glocks, but I'll remember these pics every time I strip my Glocks (and others).

FlyinBryan
July 4, 2009, 02:15 PM
deleted

Crow1108
July 4, 2009, 02:22 PM
man, at least it wasn't any worse. there's a lot worse places to get shot

Indeed. I remember the post a few months back about the guy who carried his makarov in a smart carry and had an accidental discharge :eek:

kda: Welcome to the forums. Hope ya get all healed up. Glad it wasn't alot worse.

Foofles
July 4, 2009, 02:32 PM
Yikes... I'm glad you're more or less alright and I hope the hand heals well!

Thank you for being brave enough to present another reinforcement to how fundamental proper safety is.

kda
July 4, 2009, 03:08 PM
out of curiosity (BTW: I work in a trauma hospital in the operating room as a surgical technologist)...did you miss the bone in your hand that attaches the pinky? if not, did they do a surgical repair with wires or a plate and screws?

I feel for ya...I hope you have a good recovery without complications; please be very careful in the future
Yes, thanks. I did miss all the bones. They didn't stitch it closed,
too much chance for infection and they wanted it to heal from the
inside out. So it went "undressed" and un-stitched ... full open air
exposure to the open wound from day one. I was told to soak it 30
minutes twice a day in Hydrogen Peroxide for the first month to keep it
clean and cleaned out. That seemed to work.

At the emergency room, they poured disinfectant all over the wound,
then used large syringe to force saline (salt water) through the wound
and make sure it was flushed out clean. Also an I.V. to restore my body
fluid levels and get my blood pressure back up over 50 ... and I was
set to go home.

At night, I'd wrap it loosely with bandages to keep the bed sheets
clean ... didn't seem to hinder healing.

I covered that hand with a rubber glove when showering and took
a course of prescribed antibiotics for seven days. Hope this
helps answer your questions, asked and not yet asked. I figured
as a med, you might be interested in the whole bit. :-)

daorhgih
July 4, 2009, 03:15 PM
The following incident prompted me to whittle a small "extra-safety" device out of a bottle-cap, for my just newly acquired G-21: victim was showing off his new "G" at a local lumber-yard, and ended (literally) his adventure for that day, by stowing the weapon inside his waistband, in what he assumed was a safe "appendix-carry." The little-trigger and the big-trigger both simultaneously got stroked by a belt-loop, and he shot his off-side knee-cap in-half. He was in agony, but quipped, "I'm sure glad I'm already circumcised!" My "milk-jug safety" device clips firmly into the trigger-guard, both ahead of and behind the triggers. Can be instantly snapped out, but hard to figger out if one is not aware it's there. I'm one-upping Gaston on this one.

kda
July 4, 2009, 03:24 PM
As I get older, I find that the more often I do something, the more likely I am to forget to do it. Why? Because I have a PERFECT MEMORY of having already done it. And I have done it... just - not "now." (Did I take my vitamins this morning? The ones I've been taking every morning for the last 15 years? I remember picking them up; I remember swallowing - I just can't remember if it was today or yesterday.)

I think this might be one cause of the "I could have sworn I cleared it" syndrome. You clear your gun, and you clear it again, and again, and again... and then one time you don't. And, after the accident, you can't understand why you failed to clear it this time. Well, maybe it's because you thought you did. Your memory says you did. Your memory just failed to mention that you did it an hour ago and with a different gun.


Karen ... EXCELLENT POST Absolutely describes what I believe happened in this case and you put it so very well ... much better that I have been able to do. Very astute observation. Thanks!

ChCx2744
July 4, 2009, 03:29 PM
They say experience is the best teacher.

Gamera
July 4, 2009, 03:57 PM
However, I've handed a gun to a guy, and the FIRST thing he does is pull the trigger.

That happened to my cousin. He was showing someone his 92f, and the first thing the guy did was pull the trigger. There's a nice 9mm hole in his floor now...

george29
July 4, 2009, 04:51 PM
My "milk-jug safety" device clips firmly into the trigger-guard, both ahead of and behind the triggers. Can be instantly snapped out, but hard to figger out if one is not aware it's there. I'm one-upping Gaston on this one.
:barf:
I hear of people carrying their double-action revolvers in the pocket w/o a holster that properly covers the trigger guard. I also hear of people that Mexican carry double-action revolvers and DAO semi's with one in the spout. There are reasons that some days I truly understand the Anti's, there are no idiot proof guns and you can't fix stupid or replace a life or limb lost to VDP's (very dumb people). I spent 10 years in uniform and carried a BHP in condition 3 for the entire 10 years, this included the very worst of neighborhoods one can imagine. Those that carried in anything but condition 3 and those that carried Glocks were more prone to AD's. I have carried some type of handgun for the last 30 years, and I obey the first unwritten rule which is Don't unnecessarily touch your gun (or your weapon :D). Here are the rest http://billstclair.com/safetyrules.html

Dallas Jack
July 4, 2009, 07:13 PM
I just love people who don't even try to back up what they say. I had two 30-30s that didn't have ANY safeties whatsoever. No switch, no tiny lever, nothing. You pulled the hammer back and fired. The safest way to decock was to completely unload by working the action, THEN carefully dropping the hammer.


So you assert that "most" guns were lever action. I thought we were talking handguns here. OK I will admit revolvers and lever actions didn't have safeties. Semi autos (rifles and pistols), pumps, and bolt actions had safeties. Also IIRC exposed hammer lever actions had a half cock safety. Their are a few exceptions such as single shot longuns both rifles and shotguns and possibly some derringers.

I stand by my statement "False"

If you have anything else to say about safeties start a new thread.

Glad the OP is alright.
Dallas Jack

Boba Fett
July 4, 2009, 07:14 PM
Posted by dullh:

"You're going to have an accident someday too."

Wrong.

Ignoring or violating safety rules causes this. Don't blame the gun, the design, the lack of external safety, the tide, the day of the week...not everybody who handles guns will end up shooting themselves. That's only a "given" if you're a careless idiot, in which case you should swear off guns altogether before you kill yourself or somebody else.

I guess everybody wants to be sympathetic and/or make excuses for this but the fact is it did not have to happen. And it won't happen to me. Period.


I couldn't agree more. It hasn't happened to me either and it never will.

FlyinBryan
July 4, 2009, 09:32 PM
I guess everybody wants to be sympathetic and/or make excuses for this but the fact is it did not have to happen. And it won't happen to me. Period.

I couldn't agree more. It hasn't happened to me either and it never will.


this has me wondering if it happens less to people that already know it never will?

Deltaboy
July 4, 2009, 09:48 PM
Hope the hand heals up soon and those pics grossed out the Wife! Dang it folks never put your hand infront of the barrel of a gun if your going to pull the trigger.

SHusky57
July 4, 2009, 09:54 PM
My experienced friend advised me to get a 5 gallon bucket and fill it with sand. Then place the bucket somewhere close to where I'd work on my guns. Whenever I have to put my finger on the trigger, the muzzle is pointed at the bucket of sand. It was good advice.

That's actually a good idea.... is there any chance of ricochet at that close range? I've never shot a bullet into a sand bucket (nor intend to) but it does sound like a good idea.

I spent 10 years in a Blue uniform and carried a BHP in condition 3 for the entire 10 years,

Really? What did you do if you ever thought you were going to need it? Afterwards did you clear it and put it back in condition 3? If by Blue uniform you mean LEO that doesn't sound practical. Condition 3 is chamber empty right? I've never heard of an LEO being condition 3.

george29
July 4, 2009, 10:31 PM
Watch this. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvytXEjoCcE&feature=related

One goes from condition 3 to condition 0 only when the threat is real, once the threat is over I would put my BHP back into condition 3. If you never heard of LEO's carrying condition 3, have you heard of LEO's AD/ND's? The whole reason the great majority of LEO's carry DAO's is to lessen the chance of an AD/ND whilst staying in condition 0 (no condition 1 for a Glock).
Don't take examples from LEO's as being the ultimate example of anything weapon related (or legal for that matter).

amd6547
July 4, 2009, 11:29 PM
I won't be polite...allowing the muzzle of your weapon to point at any part of your anatomy or anything you don't want to destroy, and pulling the trigger, is just plain stupid...Even after checking the chamber. I can't even conceive of doing that.
My firearms are treated as if loaded at all times. If I set a firearm down fully unloaded, and pick it up ten minutes later, I check the chamber first thing.

rondog
July 5, 2009, 02:02 AM
Holy Flurking Schnitt! That looks like it HURTS!!! Sure glad it wasn't any worse! This thread has prompted me to create a "gsw's" folder in my photo collection, and these are the first two. I need to start finding others and save 'em too. My 12 y.o. grandson loves to go shooting with me, and he's very safe with guns. The first thing I showed him was what they will do to water-filled jugs and soda cans, and he took it to heart. But I want to show him a collection of real blood and gore injuries to drive home the point.

notbubba
July 5, 2009, 02:42 AM
JOKE #1:
Lucky it was a 9mm, a .45 would have taken your arm off. :D


At the emergency room, they poured disinfectant all over the wound,
then used large syringe to force saline (salt water) through the wound
and make sure it was flushed out clean. Also an I.V. to restore my body
fluid levels and get my blood pressure back up over 50 ... and I was
set to go home.


JOKE #2:
So you only had a couple a hunderd dollars in doctor bills.
:rolleyes:

jbrown50
July 5, 2009, 11:06 AM
jbrown,

You're going to have an accident someday too. More than likely... the problem is the person not the weapon and some weapons make it easier. That's what you don't seem to understand.

Regards,
Beau


Several years ago I had one Negligent Discharge with a firearm and guess what......it was with a Glock, and it wasn't related to disassembly. It was due to my stupidity, period. Fortunately I heeded to the other safety measures by having the gun pointed in a safe direction and at something that I could afford to destroy (one of my wife's shoes......she has hundreds of pairs so it didn't make much of a difference:D).

What you don't seem to understand is that guns don't make mistakes. People make mistakes with guns. It is up to you, the operator, to adhere to basic safety rules especially when handling a firearm. Glock forces you to make sure that the chamber is empty before you disassemble the gun, of which you're supposed to do anyway so, what's the big deal? Are you insinuating that Glock should redesign their guns so that the slide can be removed with a round still in the chamber? How would this be safer than forcing you to do what you're supposed to do to begin with?

When pulling the trigger of a firearm either you want a round in the chamber or you don't. Why is this so hard to understand?

Tommygunn
July 5, 2009, 11:44 AM
Most guns prior to the 1970s didn't even HAVE these stupid manual so called safeties.

False
Dallas Jack



Well, to be fair, "most" guns prior to the '70s could be said to be revolvers, which don't (usually) have safeties.
Oh, yeah, I know, Colt 1911 (safety ++!!) Walther PP & PPK (safety) etc.

I'm stretching a point, OK?;)

Although I agree with the sentiment that you ought not disdain semiautos which "lack" safeties. I have a Glock 19, a Smith & Wesson M&P 40, and XD 45, which lack the traditional safety (the XD has the 1911-like spring bar the web of the hand seats when grasped correctly). I also have a Walther PP and a Walther P22, both have safeties. Also, I own revolvers, none of which have safeties.
The only REAL safety is the mush betwixt the ears.

KDA, sorry to hear about your injury and I hope you heal quickly.

Flyboy
July 5, 2009, 03:28 PM
No, TRUE (my use of the word "most" could be up for debate but you didn't even attempt to challenge anything before you ran off).

I just love people who don't even try to back up what they say. I had two 30-30s that didn't have ANY safeties whatsoever. No switch, no tiny lever, nothing. You pulled the hammer back and fired. The safest way to decock was to completely unload by working the action, THEN carefully dropping the hammer.

Back then, we learned to check chambers, and keep our damn fingers off the triggers. Now with all the stupid so called "safeties," anti gun/anti male propaganda, people (even many gun owners) have neglected to teach firearm safety, and they depend on that "safety" lever instead of using their brain.
Funny, I'm pretty sure the 1911 pattern predates 1970 (in fact, I think it is from sometime near...um...1911), and it has a both a manual safety and a passive (grip) safety. M1, M1903, both with safeties. Mausers, manual safety. Ditto with the Mosin-Nagant. Colt 1903, same as the 1911.

But your .30-30's don't have them, so they must be representative of the majority ("most") of firearms. Forms a great basis for your screed against "anti-male propaganda." Tell me, does "anti-male" extend to us when we tell you not to shoot your neighbor's dogs? Are we too sissified for you?

daorhgih
July 5, 2009, 04:05 PM
Hafta research it a bit, but I read an instruction process on how to carry a G-gun with one in the chamber, but gun NOT cocked. Reasoning was that it was quicker to jack the slide only ⅜ of an inch instead of the whole rack-it-all-the-way-back. The procedure was to dismantle the whole top end, and then assemble it with a round sitting on the firing-pin face and not cocking the mechanism. Insanity.

willbrink
July 5, 2009, 05:10 PM
"they depend on that "safety" lever instead of using their brain."

Truth. Your brain IS THE SAFETY at all times. I can see pulling the trigger on a gun I was "sure" was empty. I can't see pulling the trigger on a gun I am sure is empty with ANY part of me in front of the muzzle. That's the part I don't get when I read of these ADs. Me, even if I put one of my guns down on a table I just cleaned and know it's empty as sure as a person can know, if it's pointing at me, I will move the gun or move myself. It's just a habit, but I wont even allow myself to be swept by my own empty guns.

Gun safety is a combination of repetition that NEVER ends up being repetition + apathy, which is human nature.

Never say never. Those who say it can "never" happen to them have already lost an essential component of gun safety, which is humility around guns.

Complacency kills.

Lou McGopher
July 5, 2009, 10:47 PM
This is one reason why I'm glad my XD has a loaded chamber indicator.

FlyinBryan
July 6, 2009, 12:28 AM
Gun safety is a combination of repetition that NEVER ends up being repetition + apathy, which is human nature.

Never say never. Those who say it can "never" happen to them have already lost an essential component of gun safety, which is humility around guns.

Complacency kills.
a refreshing and open minded view. very impressed with how you laid out what this lesson should be, and i couldnt agree more.

to some it has been an all too real vision of what can happen to any of us should we ever let our guard down.


I guess everybody wants to be sympathetic and/or make excuses for this but the fact is it did not have to happen. And it won't happen to me. Period.

i said to some.

jimsmith80
July 6, 2009, 02:42 AM
Who cleans their Glock after every range time? Maybe I abuse and neglect my guns but unless you are shooting corosive stuff in it they don't need to be cleaned that often. I haven taken on (a G 19) up to 3000 rounds without cleaning and it still worked just as good. I just got bored and cleaned it.

HIcarry
July 6, 2009, 05:37 AM
Yes, thanks. I did miss all the bones. They didn't stitch it closed,
too much chance for infection and they wanted it to heal from the
inside out. So it went "undressed" and un-stitched ... full open air
exposure to the open wound from day one. I was told to soak it 30
minutes twice a day in Hydrogen Peroxide for the first month to keep it
clean and cleaned out. That seemed to work...
Noticed that you still had your ring on...most of the time we like to remove jewlery from an injured hand as it tends to swell. If the ring is left on it could restrict circulation to the finger. I can't tell you how many rings I have cut off when folks didn't remove them ASAP.

peyton
July 6, 2009, 05:57 AM
KDA You are going to have to post pictures as your hand heals, hopefully soon. I took my young children to the range and brought a watermelon and a gallon of cheap koolaid. "This is what happens when you play with guns" they shot the gallon jug and watermelon with my 1911 and they exploded. Useful lesson, your picture will go into my learn from some else folder. Thanks for posting.

Double Naught Spy
July 6, 2009, 08:29 AM
And no I don't blame the Glock. This is MY fault and my fault alone.

And while it may be your fault alone, the repetition with which this happens with Glocks would seem to indicate that it is a design flaw at least in the sense that the trigger must be pulled at a time when folks have no intention of discharging the gun.

Truth. Your brain IS THE SAFETY at all times.
And it is one of the weaker aspects of safety programs.

Never say never.
But you just did in the line above that statement...
Gun safety is a combination of repetition that NEVER ends up being repetition + apathy, which is human nature.

Nate1778
July 6, 2009, 08:38 AM
Noticed that you still had your ring on...most of the time we like to remove jewlery from an injured hand as it tends to swell. If the ring is left on it could restrict circulation to the finger. I can't tell you how many rings I have cut off when folks didn't remove them ASAP.



Funny you mention that, I had an encounter with a Cabinet saw about a year ago that took off pretty much the tip of every finger on the left hand. First thing the 8 month pregnant with twins wife told me to do after she recovered from the blood. She doesn't take blood well, but she did say if I didn't take it off then they would cut it off, and you know how woman can get about "The Ring".

Bass Killer
July 6, 2009, 08:51 AM
Thats a pretty nice wound for a FMJ. What brand of 9mm Ammo was it?

cracked junior
July 6, 2009, 09:08 AM
Glock is not the only handgun with this design. My Springfield XD 45.acp also requires the trigger pull to tear down.

mattk
July 6, 2009, 10:00 AM
I can't believe Nobody has said it yet!
If it was a .45 you wouldn't have a hand ! Kidding of course.
I saw a wound like this that was caused by a gentleman trying to clear a jammed LLAMA .45.
He had his hand on the front of the slide and was hitting the grip of the gun.
Best I can figure, the stuck casing came free and he cycled the gun hitting it. Once it cycle, the surprise of the jam clearing caused him to close is fist around the grip pulling the trigger.

c919
July 6, 2009, 12:22 PM
Thats not too bad... You should see this hangnail I had earlier, its was excruciating!

No, Im just kidding. Thank you so much for sharing this with us. We all make mistakes, and hopefully some of us can learn from others, instead of the hard way.

I hope you feel better soon. Thats one heck of an injury, I know if that happened to me it would be a financial disaster. I hope all you have to worry about is healing up good. Best regards.

Rockwell1
July 6, 2009, 03:20 PM
You never pick up a weapon without clearing it

Why is that so hard to understand?

EdLaver
July 6, 2009, 03:38 PM
Glad to see you didnt lose a finger or knuckle. I have a mechanism in my brain that WILL NOT let me strip my glock and xd's with with out racking them 5 times before I pull the trigger to complete the take down. Even if I am 500% sure.

Double Naught Spy
July 6, 2009, 03:49 PM
You never pick up a weapon without clearing it

Why is that so hard to understand?

Because sometimes when you pick up a weapon, you want to shoot it?

rosemont
July 6, 2009, 03:56 PM
This is one reason why I'm glad my XD has a loaded chamber indicator.

Most likely his glock does too. :rolleyes:

I love the posts blaming the gun design. :D :banghead:

Good luck with the healing.

bigione
July 6, 2009, 04:36 PM
God bless and good luck. Your bad luck better be behind you!! How did you type thsi post? Ond handed?

Rockwell1
July 6, 2009, 04:58 PM
Because sometimes when you pick up a weapon, you want to shoot it?

Well yeah:rolleyes: but other than that

sweet45
July 6, 2009, 05:23 PM
I don't think pulling the trigger for take-down is that big of a deal. Drop the magazine, rack the dam slide a few times and clear the chamber, then disassemble. Regardless of the gun or take-down procedure, you get sloppy, you get hurt!

Pistola
July 6, 2009, 05:34 PM
Hope ya get better soon. At least it wasn't an HP in there.

Shung
July 6, 2009, 06:37 PM
This is one reason why I'm glad my XD has a loaded chamber indicator.

So does a glock too..

kda
July 6, 2009, 06:58 PM
KDA You are going to have to post pictures as your hand heals, hopefully soon. I took my young children to the range and brought a watermelon and a gallon of cheap koolaid. "This is what happens when you play with guns" they shot the gallon jug and watermelon with my 1911 and they exploded. Useful lesson, your picture will go into my learn from some else folder. Thanks for posting.

OK, here it is almost closed. This picture was taken May 22nd. The incident occurred April 29th. You can see I'm a fast healer. I am lucky that way too, I guess. The wound is now totally closed but the hand surgeon said the nerves would take much longer to return to normal feeling and function and he was sure right about that. He estimated (from his experiences) that nerve repair might take four months.

To that fellow who mentioned the ring, I did take it off very soon after I took the pictures.


The thing about this discussion that surprised me most was the number folks who are ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN that they are "too smart", "too careful" or "too whatever" for something like this to ever happen to them. To those who are so sure they are a 'god' and feel the need to pontificate about how "this and that" you are ... I worry for you. That "attitude" perfectly describes me right up to when I looked down and saw this hole in my palm. I hope that you actually are as great as you think you are ... no one needs a humility lesson like the one I gave myself.

You can click on the smaller picture if you want to see a picture that is almost full size.
To those who are human and gave me some room for human frailties .. THANKS!
To those who wished me a quick and complete recovery .. THANKS!

Oyeboten
July 6, 2009, 07:50 PM
Hi kda,




Glad to see things have been healing up so nicely..!


Yahhh...'Nerves' can and will take a while to re-esabilsh themselves...and or a percentage will be back on line at some point, as the remainder continues to slowly re-establish over many Months.


I agree with your observaion about how being haughty dismissive or 'Not me!' is not a good attitude.


We are all potentially fallible...and insisting for ourselves, to be methodical, and consistant, even Ritualizing the moves and observances, in all our particular Safety Practices, is merely practical Wisdom, or, the widsom of experience...the wisdom of prudence.

JOH74
July 6, 2009, 07:56 PM
Thanks for sharing man!

Rockwell1
July 6, 2009, 09:07 PM
I'm one of the "haughty" I guess but I stand by my original statement, You clear ( by clear I mean drop the magazine lock the action open and visually inspect the chamber and ensure that you see light) every firearm you touch, every time you touch it and things like this don't happen.

Say what you will, I haven't blown a hole in my anatomy yet.

Hanzerik
July 6, 2009, 10:05 PM
All I can say is ouch.

highmountain78
July 6, 2009, 11:12 PM
I feel for you and it is an important reminder to all that there is no second chance with a firearm.

However, I am a bit confused or did not understand something. A Glock 19 has no hammer to the best of my knowledge. Glocks are hammerless guns.

My Glock 26 has no hammer. There is only one way to completely safety a Glock. Remove the mag, Firmly grasp the butt, with the finger OFF the trigger, resting on the slide, and pull back the slide; locking it and let the chambered round fall out.

After and only after the above has been performed, release the slide and depress the trigger.

Never, never cross any part of your body or anyone elses with the muzzle of a gun, the finger is always off the trigger until ready to shoot. That principle applies to any gun, semi auto, revolver, anything.

Sorry for your trouble.

Tommygunn
July 6, 2009, 11:23 PM
A Glock 19 has no hammer to the best of my knowledge. Glocks are hammerless guns.


True. I have a G19; no hammer as it's a strike fired gun. IIRC the mechanism in all Glocks is similar except for the size of the gun.

Oyeboten
July 6, 2009, 11:24 PM
Hi Rockwell1,


Oh, I quite agree...


I am saying in fact, that we do well to formalize and practice definite procedures.


And, that we do so, at least in part, in recognition of our own (and other's)potential fallibility...as in 'thinking' a Gun is not Loaded, instead of making positively sure by safe methods of inspection.


And...we omit these surities at our own or other's peril.


And, as you suggest, I agree, with any Automatic, always, with finger away from the Trigger, remove the Magazine if it has one, and, open back the Slide or other to visually look into the Chamber and Magazine Well...making sure the Arm is clear of any Ammunition, before handling it further.


I am affirming the desireability of sound and definite practices as deeds, and, acknowledging the potential risk of merely 'thinking' one has rightly checked and positively cleared an Arm (already).




Phil

kda
July 6, 2009, 11:52 PM
However, I am a bit confused or did not understand something. A Glock 19 has no hammer to the best of my knowledge. Glocks are hammerless guns.

My Glock 26 has no hammer. There is only one way to completely safety a Glock. Remove the mag, Firmly grasp the butt, with the finger OFF the trigger, resting on the slide, and pull back the slide; locking it and let the chambered round fall out.


"Drop the Hammer" was used as a figure of speech. If I say "I sent a round flying down range, I don't really mean to say the bullet actually had wings or anything like that". So if a Glock doesn't have an internal hammer, then I pulled the trigger as required to release whatever you like to call it to finish preparing the weapon for disassembly.

Anyway, I'm sorry for the confusion. I didn't mean to be obscure. It was simply a matter of me "thinking" I had cleared the magazine when, in fact, I had not. I was sure I had ... I was mistaken. I know how to clear a Glock, I know I should clear the chamber, I've done it hundreds of time ... and all of that. It isn't that I didn't know. Is it that I thought I had when I had not.

I was raised to believe that we all make mistakes. This one was a biggie. From some of the replies to this post, it appears that there is a magic circle of people out there that haven't made their first mistake yet and cannot yet grasp how humans can "err" since they never have. I think that is terrific. I understand their outrage that I am embarrassing the human race and I envy their perfection.

Alas, I must confess, I am flawed. :banghead:

Some readers of this thread appear to be finding benefit from my "confession". For that, I am genuinely pleased.

I'm happy too for those who found this an opportunity to thump their chest. Ego's need exercise too. ;)

kda
July 7, 2009, 12:10 AM
Thats a pretty nice wound for a FMJ. What brand of 9mm Ammo was it?
PMC Bronze. Most of the visible damage (skin loss) was likely muzzle blast.

Rockwell1
July 7, 2009, 12:10 AM
It appears that there is a magic circle of people out there that haven't made their first mistake yet and cannot yet grasp how humans can "err"

I never claimed perfection I claimed absolute adherance to the rule that you clear every weapon you touch every time you touch it.

(With the obvious exception of a weapon you've just loaded and intend to fire)

I am the only one with access to my safe there is one gun loaded in it and the rest are empty. Some of the empties haven't seen daylight in a year they still get cleared.

If I show you one of my (small) collection the weapon gets cleared and you get to look into to the chamber as well and you get asked " Do you agree that this weapon is clear?"

I am absolutely annal about that rule since the day I found a dud round in my wife's .380 after a range trip. So I guess that was my imperfection in not double checking that my wife had cleared her weapon before leaving the range.

I am also absolutely annal that no live ammunition is to be introduced into the cleaning area while weapons are being cleaned, if I clean my carry piece it is unloaded at the safe and carried to the cleaning area where it is cleared again before disassembly

Experience allows me to learn from my mistakes

Wisdom allows me to learn from your's

Double Naught Spy
July 7, 2009, 12:14 AM
You never pick up a weapon without clearing it

Why is that so hard to understand?


Because sometimes when you pick up a weapon, you want to shoot it?

Well yeah but other than that

So then that notion of "never" really doesn't apply, does it? Certainly the first thing I don't want to do when I pick up a gun in the middle of the night when I have heard something crashing against my front door is to clear my gun of ammo. That would be extremely counterproductive to having the gun ready for self defense.

Rockwell1
July 7, 2009, 12:21 AM
To then that notion of "never" really doesn't apply, does it?

You are absolutely correct, my carry weapon is loaded at all times (unless I've just shot it empty, unloaded it to load practice ammunition or unloaded it to clean it. Don't want to be imprecise now.) I also don't put my hand in front of the muzzle and pull the trigger.

What I'm doing has worked up to this point, if it ever doesn't I will let you know.

jeepmor
July 7, 2009, 12:22 AM
I'm sorry this happened to the OP and also thankful he was man enough to share his painful mistake as a simple reminder of safety and the consequences of slipping, if only just once.

Gryffydd
July 7, 2009, 12:27 AM
My Springfield XD 45.acp also requires the trigger pull to tear down.
The difference is that the process requires the slide to be pulled fully to the rear in order to flip the disassembly lever up. This necessitates you clearing the chamber to disassemble.

Eightball
July 7, 2009, 12:33 AM
Oh geez.......that's less than appealing looking.

TwistedMinded_Biker
July 7, 2009, 12:52 AM
Thanks for sharing, as soon as I seen your post I pulled both my boys and wife into to read, see that this could happen to the best of us.
I think it help make my point to them to clear-clear-clear ,and check again assume every gun they pick up or are handed is always load .Hey Man hope all works out , & IMO a stand up guy to post this to help others . Twisted

Lonestar49
July 7, 2009, 01:08 AM
...

Yep, to error is to be human, but.. Ouch!

Could have been a brain fart. Ya thought ya did, but didn't, but I bet ya will always pull the slide back, "one more time" to verify the chamber is empty from now on.. That's the lesson learned.. verify

Question: Had you seen a Doctor about your hand at the time of the photo was taken..?

And have you seen a Doctor about your hand at all..?

It really looks like it's gonna take some time to heal with that layer of flesh burned, blown, off, as the entry and exit wounds will heal far faster..

This should make for some good one-hand (off hand) shooting for ya for awhile..


Ls ;)

twofifty
July 7, 2009, 01:17 AM
This has been an interesting and instructive thread, and I appreciate KDA's (the OP) candor in telling us how easily this accident happened.

His statement that "It isn't that I didn't know. Is it that I thought I had [cleared the gun] when I had not." is a quasi universal truth, and it needs saying and repeating, and for that I am grateful. Since I am fallible, this and similar accounts may help save me from the same or worse fate.

There is a reason that modern industrial safety programs rely on safety meetings and safety audits: humans are fallible, and safe behaviour/practices need frequent reinforcement.

To reinforce KDA's point, just a few weeks ago while demonstrating safe handgun practice to a new shooter I unholstered my handgun and cleared it while saying "now this gun is clear but..." and lo and behold, there was a round in the chamber. I wasn't really surprised as I expected the round to be there for I'd just loaded and holstered cocked and locked, but part of my mind was half-expecting the gun to be clear. It wasn't. Human minds are frail instruments indeed.


Rockwell1 tells us that "I am also absolutely anal that no live ammunition is to be introduced into the cleaning area while weapons are being cleaned."

Now that too is good advice. Stories here and elsewhere confirm that cleaning firearms is best done in a room that contains absolutely no ammo. A moments distraction can so easily lead to inadvertently 'dry firing' a loaded gun, for instance. Folk have shot their TVs that way.

I have not really added anything new here, but feel that nurturing this thread helps keep members of the community safe, uninjured and alive.
It sure has helped me.

Glad you're healing so well KDA.

sarduy
July 7, 2009, 01:45 AM
KDA i hope you get better soon man.

This is why I dont shoot my Glock that much, you have to pull the trigger to disassemble it for cleaning. The moron who thought that up should be drawn and quartered!

there is nothing wrong with that. and that moron as you call him, build one of the best gun so far.

just follow this directions and you'll find that glock are as safe as any other gun to disassemble.

1. point in a safe direction & finger off the trigger
2. remove the magazine
3. move the slide back and forward 3/4 times
4. LOOK AT THE CHAMBER, MAKE SURE IT'S EMPTY.
5. disassemble it.

if step 2,3,4 fails step 1 will get you cover.

FlyinBryan
July 7, 2009, 01:57 AM
lol, i would be willing to bet that this never happens to kda again.

Rockwell1
July 7, 2009, 02:51 AM
lol, i would be willing to bet that this never happens to kda again.

And I bet he's going to be more of a jerk than I am about clearing his weapon.

. move the slide back and forward 3/4 times

Just me but I don't like that one. I preffer locking the action open and inspecting the chamber.

mbt2001
July 7, 2009, 11:50 AM
Everyone that lives in a suburban / urban area should have get a Safe Direction plate. http://www.safedirection.com/ That allows you to have you muzzle in a safe direction, so, God forbid, you have an incident like this, it harmlessly goes into the plate.

I have explained to people over and over again that the 4 rules are such that IF you follow 1 of them, no one gets hurt. In order for someone to get hurt you have to violate all 4 simultainiosly.

Boba Fett
July 7, 2009, 12:19 PM
Everyone that lives in a suburban / urban area should have get a Safe Direction plate. http://www.safedirection.com/ That allows you to have you muzzle in a safe direction, so, God forbid, you have an incident like this, it harmlessly goes into the plate.

Those are pretty interesting. Good link.

kda
July 7, 2009, 01:24 PM
...

... but I bet ya will always pull the slide back, "one more time" to verify the chamber is empty from now on.. That's the lesson learned.. verify

Question: Had you seen a Doctor about your hand at the time of the photo was taken..?
Ls ;)

Lonestar 49 ... that is a bet you would almost certainly win. Nothing will get one to refocus on fundamentals like a hole in one's hand.

To answer some of your other questions and fill in some blanks .. the first pictures (posted with the original message at the start of this thread) were taken by me with my good hand when I got home from the ER/Doctor's office. I just went out on the patio with my little Canon camera and made a record so that I would never ever forget.

After the incident, I went to ER. They flushed it out with salt water, gave me an IV to restore my body fluids and to get my Blood Pressure back up from 45/20. Then they took x-rays and sent me immediately to a hand surgeon to see if any additional treatment was needed.

All medical personnel agreed to just leave the wound open and uncovered until it healed. Except for the nerves in that area, it has healed surprisingly quickly and without meaningful external scaring. I do have quite a lump of something very hard under the skin right where the center of the would was ... I'm guessing it is scar tissue. The doctor seemed to think so. No infection at all and the wound is still painful if I press on it directly. Soaking that entire hand twice daily (30 minutes per soak) in Hydrogen Peroxide seemed to solve any potential infection issues for the wound stayed very clean. As I indicated, I soaked twice daily in HP, 30 minutes per soak for several weeks. Four weeks I think it was. Walmart was scrambling to keep supplied.

I've seen the hand surgeon twice since ER and have been released from all medical care at this point. Browse a couple of my follow up posts (above) for additional detail and thanks for your best wishes and encouragement. I appreciate it.

Lesson learned ... the hard way for me.

In the ER, I mentioned that if they REALLY WERE going to force saline solution through the wound to flush it out they should, at the very least, give me a "stick to bite" or a "stiff shot of bar whiskey" .... But they didn't. :uhoh: The ER Nurse was a little surprised that I just sat there and watched it all. Then as we visited the nurse noted that it is usually the young "toughs" from the street gangs that whine, scream and cry through it all.

In reality, the salt water hurt a lot less than the disinfectant they poured on it first.

JImbothefiveth
July 7, 2009, 01:31 PM
I've got one question: Does the g19 require you point it in an unsafe direction? Because I might have to take that one off my list.

Lou McGopher
July 7, 2009, 06:11 PM
Most likely his glock does too.

I love the posts blaming the gun design.

Good luck with the healing.

I didn't think Glocks had that... but I just learned they do come with that now. When did they start adding that feature?

And I wasn't blaming the gun design. But would you not agree that this sort of thing would happen less often if all guns had a light that flashed red when there was a round in the chamber? (I apologize in advance for opening my mouth if that sort of technology is mandated any future gun control legislation.) People make mistakes when using machines, but that isn't to say the machines can't have features that reduce the likelihood of a person screwing up with it.

Smithiac
July 7, 2009, 09:50 PM
Lets not forget muzzle control if that was not pointed away from the important stuff you would have been an article in the paper not a post on the internet. Thank you for sharing, its a tiny reminder to us all to be more carefull. I haven't been in your shoes but I have been close.

Thanks again

cchris
July 7, 2009, 10:48 PM
I cannot disclose by what means or where, but I see these things everyday, some of them give me nightmares. Lucky it didn't do too much damage, but I'm guessing the largely-scarred area around the entry point was caused by the ignition of the powder?

highmountain78
July 8, 2009, 12:51 AM
My sincere apology if I came off too judgemental, for I assure you I was not judging.

I simply wanted to point out some principles of muzzle control. However, I made a BIG goof about thirty some years ago.

A friend and I had enjoyed an evening of poker and more than few scotch's, he felt inclined to show me his latest pistol purchase.

He handed me the pistol, a Colt 45 ACP, nice I said, looking over the gun.

I flipped the thumb safety off, pointed the gun at the wall, and squeezed the trigger.

BANG!!!! a hole in the wall, He exclaimed SHI@, and I did it! I still don't know what caused me not to check the gun or why he had not.

Poor Rich has since passed on, I sometimes wonder if that incident took a couple years off his life?

I know, SHI# does happen.

Live, learn and prosper.

model of 1905
July 8, 2009, 10:52 PM
And it won't happen to me. Period.


Remember those words, hope they don't come back to haunt you.:eek:

model of 1905
July 8, 2009, 11:06 PM
I treat my guns as if they are always loaded for a very good reason. They ARE always loaded.

Davek1977
July 9, 2009, 05:38 AM
I'm in no way critcizing the OP or anyone else in this thread, but I think the comments about weapons needing manuel safeties, avbout Glocks bewing "inherrently dangerous" due the trigger needing to be pulled for disassembly and whanot are all way off base. Whether its the first of 100th time I've handled a particulart gun in a hour, day, week, month, etc....When I pick it up, the first thing I do is open the cylinder if a revolver, drop the mag and check the chamber if an automatic, open the bolt or a rifle or shotgun, etc. I do this EVERY time, because "knowing" its empty isn't good enough. I have to be visually assured of the fact. I don't trust myself, my wife, my father, my best friend....ANYONE...enough to simply assume or take their word for it when it comes to guns. My Sigma also needs to be dry-fired to disassemble, and I don't think twice about it....I do things the same way each and every time, and have never had issues doing so.

Rem870Fan
July 9, 2009, 06:18 AM
Thanks for sharing these painful pics. Reminding folks that things like this can happen might prevent something similar or worse.

Regular Joe
July 9, 2009, 06:23 AM
There ya' go. Everything related to firearms is a discipline. I got my G-19 about 6 months ago, and from day one, discipline has dictated that I look first at the chamber and then the trigger to see if a round is chambered. On the 19, you can see part of the chambered cartridge behind the breech. The trigger is a good ways forward in the "ready" position than it is after firing. Drop the mag, place it nearby, and lock the breech open. The gun is clear. Close the action, and aim at something that can take a hit. Dry fire.
I've had firearms for over 45 years, with one ND involving a bolt rifle through the ceiling. No blood. I've been surprised a time or three when I've pulled the trigger on a gun that I thought was empty after firing a mag, but they've always been pointed down range.
Handling a gun is like handling a car when you're doing 80 mph. You just plain better know what's going on.

smktr8
July 9, 2009, 06:32 AM
Wow looks like you wont forget that I have herd of this happing to cops in NYPD and Boston PD. This dose not make Glock a bad gun or the way it is built this just shows as you now always know whats in you gun and always clear it and treat it like it loaded!!! Sorry to had to have a reminder of this good thing this is all that happen could of been alot worse could of hit somone else.:uhoh:

Erik
July 9, 2009, 09:58 PM
Thanks for sharing. I hope that you heal quickly and fully.

Boba Fett
July 9, 2009, 11:17 PM
And it won't happen to me. Period.
Remember those words, hope they don't come back to haunt you.

No worry of haunting. Davek1977, in addition to others, has summed up why some of us do not worry about this happening to us:

I'm in no way critcizing the OP or anyone else in this thread, but I think the comments about weapons needing manuel safeties, avbout Glocks bewing "inherrently dangerous" due the trigger needing to be pulled for disassembly and whanot are all way off base. Whether its the first of 100th time I've handled a particulart gun in a hour, day, week, month, etc....When I pick it up, the first thing I do is open the cylinder if a revolver, drop the mag and check the chamber if an automatic, open the bolt or a rifle or shotgun, etc. I do this EVERY time, because "knowing" its empty isn't good enough. I have to be visually assured of the fact. I don't trust myself, my wife, my father, my best friend....ANYONE...enough to simply assume or take their word for it when it comes to guns.

Amen!

sweet45
July 21, 2009, 11:05 AM
I don't understand all the retarded comments about the Glock, and pulling the trigger for take down. How many people here dry fire their 1911 for practice? probably quite a few. But that's OK. If you empty the damn gun before you disassemble, you won't shoot yourself. It's really that simple.

Double Naught Spy
July 22, 2009, 06:22 PM
It really is that simple, yet this problem happens repetitively with Glocks. The one gun show I was at where there was an ND was when a Glock armorer shot a Glock into the floor when he was taking down a gun to work on it. No doubt the guy had taken down Glocks 10s of thousands of times and BOOM it happened.

The problem with Glocks is that the MUST have the trigger pulled for take down.

The #1 safety is between your ears and yet it is the #1 most fallible safety as well. Ironic, no?

Seenterman
July 22, 2009, 07:04 PM
Ahhhh! Ow ow ow ow i need the eye bleach!

masonaux
August 31, 2010, 02:25 AM
wait a minute, I thought a Glock 19 doesn't have a hammer... maybe i misread it?

Radium
August 31, 2010, 06:16 AM
wait a minute, I thought a Glock 19 doesn't have a hammer... maybe i misread it?

well it has a stiker witch basicly is a hammer.

ZCORR Jay
August 31, 2010, 07:36 AM
Gotta say thanks for sharing. It images like those that keep us aware of what can happen with a simple slip of the mind. Hope the hand heals up good and fast.

Dewey 68
August 31, 2010, 09:25 AM
Gotta say thanks for sharing. It images like those that keep us aware of what can happen with a simple slip of the mind. Hope the hand heals up good and fast.
I hope it is, the original post is over a year old. :) Maybe the OP will update us with some pix of his hand after it healed.

Old Guy
August 31, 2010, 09:51 AM
I hope it is, the original post is over a year old. Maybe the OP will update us with some pix of his hand after it healed.

I think I would also like to see the healed hand, and know if there is any nerve damage?

I carry the same pistol, the Glock 19, tip for disassembly, magazine out, then lock the slide back! Leave the slide back, check the breach.

Even after you allow the slide to go forward, in the dark even! You can feel the extractor sticking out if there is a round up the pipe!

See what can happen when you get careless? very graphic.

sxshep
August 31, 2010, 11:50 AM
Best of luck with your recovery... I'm still recovering from my June 20th negligent discharge from my Kimber 1911. Since then, I've become a safety nut around any weapons.

kda
August 31, 2010, 02:44 PM
Regarding the reply by masonaux about the Glock not having a hammer. We've all had our fun with that one already ... a couple of times in fact! How tiresome.

Good idea from a couple of others who want to see how it turned out.
I stepped out onto the back patio a few moments ago and here is the entry wound all healed up.

http://lh5.ggpht.com/_o4ugbklqmno/TH1Dbne9zMI/AAAAAAAAAig/jFNvBWsO3EI/s800/Healed%20Palm%202%20%28Medium%29.jpg

Here is the exit wound a bit over one year later.

http://lh4.ggpht.com/_o4ugbklqmno/TH1Db1NPCuI/AAAAAAAAAik/MP1GWoWUzyY/s800/Exit%20Area%20Healed%20%28Medium%29.jpg

There has been some persistent nerve damage. When I push directly on the surface of the entry wound with the thumb from my other hand, the wound area feels bumpy to the thumb. Feels as if there were ridges of hard scar tissue under the skin. And that area of my palm feels "numbly tingly", if that description makes any sense. There is no sensation at the site of the exit wound, just a tiny dead area about the size of a pencil eraser.

The little finger is partially numb, but not so much that it continues to interfere with my typing. That is I can barely feel the keys with my little finger but I can feel them. The little finger never hurts unless I put it up against something that is cold, like a glass of iced tea. Otherwise is it quite tingly when touched, but only when touched. Never bothers my sleep or anything I do.

So I got really lucky. Like one of my doctors said ... "That is the best shot you will ever make in your life". There were so many ways to hit something serious and really damage that hand ... well I got off easy.

And ... and ... wait for it ... like I tell people who know about it ... "com'on, haven't you always wondered what it felt like to be shot?". That even got a laugh out of my doctor.

I have since put 6,500 down range rounds through that particular Glock and have not has anything even approaching and "incident", accident or mishap. So the experience did:

1. Answer my question about what it would feel like.

2. Teach me a lot about never assuming anything when handling weapons ... check and recheck.

3. Did not stop me from improving my shooting skills.

porterdog
August 31, 2010, 02:52 PM
Thx for update.

Nushif
August 31, 2010, 03:37 PM
I almost had a ND the other day.

I was moving the wife's Beretta the other day. It has an identical twin that she also messes with sometimes and decided I'd play with it a bit, myself. One is always locked and loaded, the other is rarely shot or fed any ammo.
So I dropped the mag and wanted to lower the hammer. (It's a single action, one of the older ones.)

Suddenly I got this massive wave of Bad JuJu and figured I'd check the chamber, too, since I can drop the hammer on 1911s proficiently, but hers feels different and sometimes it snaps. Also I didn't *remember* actually looking at the magazine.

So I racked the slide. And lo and behold, out tumbles a nice little surprise. That was a doozie.

Demitrios
August 31, 2010, 03:48 PM
I've been shooting since I was a kid, around firearms even longer and whenever anyone feels the need to check if I'm being safe I appreciate it. This is not the kind of sport for big egos when it comes to safety. And KDA. . . . QUIT PICKING IT!

kda
August 31, 2010, 04:06 PM
Quit picking it???? QUIT PICKING IT?? .... sound like my wife. :)

Kingofthehill
August 31, 2010, 05:11 PM
I love the people who say

"So you don't have to pull the trigger to take down the XDm... its not an issue, really"

Full Metal Jacket
September 1, 2010, 03:54 AM
glad to see your hand healed up well.


one good way of looking at the whole situation is, there's much worse appendages to inadvertently shoot....:eek:

did the police hassle you for illegal weapons discharge or anything?

gun guy
September 1, 2010, 04:20 AM
There have been numours "accidental" discharges with glocks. Far more actually then with other similar weapons. Some resulting in fatalities. Several departments have changed firearms due to this problem. True it is usually operator error, but we are human and sometimes not totally focused on the task at hand. However, if you follow common gun safety procedure, clear the weapon, check the weapon..POINT THE MUZZLE IN A SAFE DIRECTION..before you pull the trigger, most likely one step will catch and stop the accident. I do extend my sympathys and wish you a speedy recover. Have a great day.

Dewey 68
September 1, 2010, 09:46 AM
Looks pretty good. I'll bet some of that nerve damage will continue to improve. The human body is an amazing machine!

357reloading
September 1, 2010, 09:55 AM
gave a cousin, 1972 walther ppks, he shot his finger off, checknig if loaded or not in dimly lit room. Had thumb in tirgger guard and finger over barrwl. Daughter, told him, dont worry will grow back.


He died few years ago, so i sold the gun, did not like the stiff slide myself . getting to old and grip in hands failing.

Shadowdancer
September 1, 2010, 01:11 PM
Thank you for sharing. It is a great reminder to me to be careful.

kda
September 1, 2010, 01:22 PM
FMJ ... your question about police involvement. In AZ, the medical types do not ordinarily alert the police at all if they are convinced that it was accidental and not part of a criminal act or activity. There is no requirement that they report accidental gunshot wounds. That is what they told me at the emergency room of the hospital.

They accepted my plea of "stupid self inflicted" and that was that. I was delighted I didn't have a bunch of forms and reports to fill out. That saved me a bunch of hassle at a time I didn't need any more hassle.

kentucky bucky
September 1, 2010, 02:08 PM
That's gonna leave a mark.....

Toaster
September 1, 2010, 02:59 PM
Thanks to the Op for sharing and thanks for the recent bump. This thread ties in very well with the more recent AD threads. Nice reminders for everyone that it can and does happen.

Downr@nge
September 1, 2010, 06:04 PM
Good lord! Glad you are okay and your injuries are healing up nicely! I just sent a link to this thread to my Sister in law who is about to purchase her first handgun. Hopefully she'll remember this and try not to make the same mistake.

gym
September 1, 2010, 06:29 PM
Heal quicklly my friend. There is nothing to say in a case like this, I am sure you beat yourself up enough. That's why they call them accidents. Please remember that there are probablly more Glocks in use out in the world, than any other gun, and many inexperienced shooters, "not the op", buy them because they are popular, "as a first gun". IE: I went shooting yesterday, first time in over a year, "we moved". I put up an ad in the community newsletter, and a retired transit guy, "not a leo", from NY answered me along with a couple other guys, all looking for shooting partners. He had a Glock, and shot it ok, "typical", he only went out to 15 yards, but was inside the lines of the stencil. As we shot he mentioned that he liked shooting my 26 better than his 17. So I asked how long he had it and explained without sounding like a "know it all" that some people shoot short sighted guns better. Turns out he has only been shooting for 3 months. First gun was a Glock. So there are a lot of people shooting Glocks therefore more likelly to have an accident just for the sheer numbers alone. He also had a Sig 22 in cameo, "ugly". He didn't like that at all. I am going to let him shoot my 45 next time, and ease into a little "education" if he is agreeable. He's a real nice guy and seemed to be in to all the instruction he could get from me. I also caught him resting his finger on the front of the trigger gaurd and fixed that problem of pulling his shots to the left. He thought that the serrations were there for that reason, "many people think that". I showed him the variations of how to hold the weapon, and he did better right away.

kda
September 1, 2010, 06:35 PM
AFTER PICTURES HERE:

For those who missed them, the AFTER (all healed) pictures are now up on Page 6, Post #143.

sam05
September 1, 2010, 06:50 PM
two years and a few days ago i had the misfortune of ripping about an inch off the end of one of my fingers, while not firearm inflicted it did a lot of damage. had it reattached, and it works somewhat like it should, but even after two years i am still feeling the nerve regeneration, it comes and goes for quite sometime before it becomes permenant. it will probably all come back, just give it time, glad to see you are doing well.

sam

kda
September 1, 2010, 06:53 PM
Hey, Sam, thanks for the encouragement. Means a lot.

KodiakBeer
September 1, 2010, 07:08 PM
I don't think Glocks are more dangerous than other handguns, but they do seem to attract newbies who are more prone to accidents. Note that the OP thinks the Glock is a clip fed weapon...

gym
September 1, 2010, 07:11 PM
Yes Kodiak, they are very popular thats what I was eluding to, they are a modern day substitute for the word, "gun".

Full Metal Jacket
September 1, 2010, 07:12 PM
In AZ, the medical types do not ordinarily alert the police at all if they are convinced that it was accidental and not part of a criminal act or activity. There is no requirement that they report accidental gunshot wounds. That is what they told me at the emergency room of the hospital.

thanx for the response. glad to hear you didn't have to deal with all that.

kda
September 1, 2010, 07:25 PM
I don't think Glocks are more dangerous than other handguns, but they do seem to attract newbies who are more prone to accidents. Note that the OP thinks the Glock is a clip fed weapon...

I'm guessing you never served your country in the military. It shows in your attitude. Nothing to contribute to the conversation, so you run your mouth anyway. In the military we learned a different lexicon than you self professed experts who seem to think your knowledge is superior on all things including handguns and the English language.

My heaven, I am SO IMPRESSED WITH YOU Mr. Beer! Not in the way you might wish, but impressed nevertheless. I'm sure your perfection inspires all of us.

I will, however, continue to struggle to meet your expectations but I must warn you, your level of perfection is so high, I fear you will forever be disappointed with the rest of the world that surrounds you. But we must all continue to struggle, to learn to think and speak as you do. I do not envy you the task of living with your own opinion of yourself. For that you have my sincere condolences.

kda
September 1, 2010, 07:28 PM
Yes Kodiak, they are very popular thats what I was eluding to, they are a modern day substitute fot the word, "gun".
You and Mr. Beer should meet for a few drinks. Then you can exercise your arms patting each other and yourselves on the back.

But really, don't take me seriously. The country loves elitist. Look at who we elected for president and to run the Senate and House.

KodiakBeer
September 1, 2010, 07:54 PM
I'm guessing you never served your country in the military.

Only 20 years.

There's nothing elitist about knowing the names of the various parts and accessories of a firearm. We were all newbies at one time or another and we all made our mistakes. I certainly made mine.

gym
September 1, 2010, 07:55 PM
What the heck are you talking about KDA, I hav had Glocks since they first came out. And carrying for almost 40 years. My statment was merely that there are many IE: my neighboors who are new shooters and would be better served with a different type of pistol for their first one. You seem to have a chip on your shoulder. I even wrote "not the op", what's your problem? If everyone drove a toyota, there would be more accidents with toyotas that's what I said basically.

Shadow 7D
September 1, 2010, 08:07 PM
KDA, you might want to re-read the forum rules, AD Hominum attacks are generally frowned upon as not The High Road. As for the military, I can attest that clip and magazine was a peeve for my Drill Sergeants, maybe not FMJ (the movie) level, but you at least got yelled at, if not worse for that one. And I do wonder what those post contribute to the thread...

I hope he is recovering well, I took a large chunk of my finger off shaping end caps on a bench router 2 years ago. It still feels funny, but has mostly regrown, I just have a funny curve in the nail now.

FLAvalanche
September 1, 2010, 10:24 PM
Interesting...

If you shoot yourself in the hand it takes people almost a year to yell at you for calling a magazine a clip instead of almost immediately.

strambo
September 1, 2010, 10:43 PM
Thanks for posting. Hand's lookin' good now. I have a striker fired pistol (Kahr) and am extra-anal about checking the chamber before having to squeze the trigger to get the slide off.

Accidents only happen when we get complacent, that is the constant enemy of safety. By posting this, you give a complacency reality check to all who read it, and maybe save someone else the same fate. I see these threads about once or twice a year and it always improves my safety for months after. Attending formal training does the same.

HeXeD775
September 1, 2010, 10:51 PM
Thanks for the pics. I am always stressing the 4 rules to my kids. I am thankful that you have shared. I would be glad to use this as an example of what is possible w/ a firearm.

Vonderek
September 2, 2010, 08:05 AM
You seem to have a chip on your shoulder.
You mean "clip" on his shoulder.:neener:
Oh oh, does this mean I get yelled at too?

crossrhodes
September 2, 2010, 08:16 AM
Your not a former Customs officer are you.

gym
September 2, 2010, 10:41 AM
I have to add one thing, taking down a glock is one of the quickest easiest guns to field strip. If you have 1911's you already know that.Even my Kel-tek pf-9, was a bitch to get back together, looking for the darn hole while holding back the slide and pushing down on the barrell, It took me 15 minutes to get the darn thing back together. Last time it took 5, "my hands must be tired", or go and disassemle a seacamp with a paper clip and the mag half out and bla bla. The glock comes apart in a second, maybe too fast, the guy in the store gave me his and I handed him the parts, that fast. It's a joy to clean and operate. But coming from a family of Marines_- pre glock, we were taught saftey so much that it was annoying. If my uncles handed you a gun, "even though he just cleared it in front of you, if you didn't check and clear it again, you got smacked in the face. Al my cousins clear their guns in their sleep. Uncle Mike was a DI, he smacked a guy who worked for me, "also an ex marine" in the face once when we were going out for a shoot. Because he failed the test. I thought the guy was going to clock my uncle, instead he said "thank you sir". That's the difference.I feel terrible that anyone shot themselves anyware, but that dosen't change the fact that it's not taught enough, "I stay away from public ranges", that's why I hadn't gone in a year. there are people in there who could kill you. 3 0f 6 lanes were blocked with construction equiptment, ladders and such, and some kid "again" was teaching his girl how to shoot. I don't know his girl, it looked like maybe her second or third time. Very uncomfortable to say the least. Especially when they have that gigantic silouette target and applaud when they hit it from 10 feet away.

KodiakBeer
September 2, 2010, 12:22 PM
I didn't mean to "yell at" the OP about calling the magazine a clip. I was trying (obviously badly) to point out that he was a novice. That may not be the case, but I think most of us immediately think "newby" when we hear that word.

Newby or not, it takes a bit of sand to stand up and say "I shot myself in the hand" so, thanks for reminding us to be safe. It can happen to any of us no matter how skilled or drilled we think we are. A moments inattention and we're suddenly nicknamed "Lefty"...

A friend of mine picked up one of those zinc .25's (Jennings, Bryco?) about ten years ago in a pawn shop on impulse because it was $50 or so. He was a skilled shooter who shot steel plate matches with a custom 1911. Well, he took that little .25 out in his backyard and managed to shoot the tip of his left index finger off with the first shot he fired with it. His match gun had one of those squared trigger guards and he threw that little zinc abortion up and cover the muzzle with his finger. Now he has to pick his nose right-handed.

It happens...

Rshooter
September 2, 2010, 03:36 PM
Thanks for the picture an owning up to it. A lesson for all.

Vonderek
September 2, 2010, 04:28 PM
KodiakBeer,
I wasn't referring to you. I was poking fun at the tirade in kda's posts 165 & 166.. I'm in your camp.

Deltaboy
September 2, 2010, 10:09 PM
Dang I bet that hurt!

hemiram
September 4, 2010, 01:39 AM
I've never admitted or told anyone this before, but years ago, like about 20, I was about to sell one of my Erma .22 PPK clones, and even though I would have sworn I had checked it when I pulled the mag out, I guess I didn't, and when I pulled the trigger, it went off. I had it pointed towards my left hand, holding the gun in my right. The bullet went along my palm, just skimming it until it hit the edge of my hand. It took a little chunk of meat off my hand and then went into an amplifier, which was turned on. It really didn't hurt all that much, the BB I have in my face hurt a lot more when it happened. There was a flash inside the amp, and the lights went out, the shorting amp popped the breaker. After I saw I wasn't hurt all that bad, I went downstairs and turned the lights back on and looked my hand over and decided I would try to doctor myself up. I probably should have had a couple of stitches, but I washed it out really well, and put Neosporin on it and used some crazy glue to close it up. It healed up very well, and there is no visible scar, but I can feel a "lump" under the skin. Since then, I have always looked twice when I work or clean a gun, once when I take it out of the case, and once again before I take it apart. So far, I've never seen a round in a gun that I didn't expect to be there.

It was a good wake up call to be more careful.

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