What guns should a father give to his children?


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kamagong
July 7, 2009, 08:56 PM
I once knew a man who believed that one of a parentís most important duties is to prepare his children to face the world. In addition to making sure that his kids grew up strong, he saw to it that they were educated as well as exposed to the real-world. He taught his children the value of a good knife and gave each one of them a Chris Reeve Sebenza. Most surprisingly, he gave each one of his kids a pistol and rifle of his or her choosing. Iím not sure of the pistols but I know that at least one of his kids chose an AR, while another chose a Springfield M1A.

I didnít pay much attention at the time because I was still young and foolish (I did not yet exercise my 2A right), but now that I look back I see a lot of wisdom in that manís words. Maybe itís the fact that my wife is pregnant with my firstborn, but Iíve been thinking quite a bit about which guns I should set aside for my children. Iím not talking about family heirlooms, Iím talking more about a basic battery of guns that I want my children to have.

I think that I will give each of my future children at least a 1911, and an AR. More than likely Iíll also get them a .22. That should be a good start I think, I know that itís not much, but itís more than my father started me out with. If my kids want to build a collection someday thatís fine, but theyíll have to do that with their own money. I just want to make sure that my children are equipped to face any physical dangers they may encounter.

Thoughts?

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KarenTOC
July 7, 2009, 09:19 PM
My suggestion, for what it's worth:

Get yourself a good gun, one you enjoy. Use it now, enjoy it, shoot it a lot and have fun with it. Later, when the time is right, teach your kid how to shoot your gun. Let your kid shoot it a lot, and learn from it, and have fun with it. Then, one day, give your kid your gun. Now the kid not only has a gun he or she knows how to shoot, but it's one that's wrapped up in memories of time well spent with dad.

The downside is, each time your wife gets pregnant, you'll have to add a gun to your have-fun-with-dad collection so you'll have a gun to pass on to the new kid. It's a sacrifice, I know, but that's what fatherhood is all about :)

si vis pacem
July 7, 2009, 09:28 PM
This is a terrific thread. My father gave me one of his 1911s right before I got married. It was my first handgun and the gesture really meant a lot since that was one of his first firearms, too.

That 1911 will never leave the family. It is a treasure.

Yo Mama
July 7, 2009, 09:30 PM
I plan on giving each child a shotgun, and handgun. Which will be up to them.

DFW1911
July 7, 2009, 09:39 PM
I received a shotgun from my father and a BHP from my grandfather (he picked it up in WWII).

Yes, I'll be hanging on to both.

gbran
July 7, 2009, 09:46 PM
I have 4 kids, 8 grandkids. As they were old enough, I taught them safe gun handling, introduced them to both hunting and shooting sports, as well as the need for self defense.

I've equipped them all with various guns.

They will have to deal with each other whenst I die for mine.

ezypikns
July 7, 2009, 09:48 PM
I've got ten grandsons and one grandaughter.

Suffice it to say they'll each get at least one firearm.

rgwalt
July 7, 2009, 09:49 PM
I don't have kids, and I'm not married, but I can see why a man would want to do this for his children. Think carefully about the weapons you choose, and go for quality above all else. I like the idea of a 1911 and a .22 of some sort (one for defense, the other for practice). I would be inclined to substitute a .357 revolver for the 1911 though. What would the core utility be of an AR? Defense? Investment in case of AWB pt 2? Instead of the AR, why not think about a more traditional rifle for marksmanship and hunting? I would also add a shotgun to the list. I would pick a quality over/under from Beretta or Browning. Something that could be used to go hunting, or shoot clays.

The choices I've made are for longevity and reliability of the equipment more than anything. A revolver over a semi-auto (even a 1911, which should last a lifetime if maintained). A traditional rifle over a more whiz bang cool AR. A over/under shotgun over a semi-auto or a pump. I suppose my goal would be to leave a set of guns to each of my children (at least the interested ones), who could then pass them on to their grandchildren, etc.

Encoreman
July 7, 2009, 09:56 PM
My .02 as I have 2 grandkids who both own guns although they don't know it yet. I say at least a .22 rifle and pistol, shotgun, hunting rifle. After that you can splurge for the AR or AK or whatever, that is if they are still available at that point it time. And make sure to have the ammo for the guns you give as that too may be unavailable. You know, 50 years ago I bet nobody had this kind of a conversation. Times have changed, and not for the better.

Deltaboy
July 7, 2009, 09:58 PM
A shotgun, a 22 rifle, a handgun in at least 357 and a Rifle in a deer caliber 243-up.

TCB in TN
July 7, 2009, 10:00 PM
Sentimental value is important IMHO, BUT not every gun you pass on needs to have it. I have a couple of guns from my Grandpa, and a couple my dad bought for me, they do have more value to me, and eventually they will be passed on to my kids, along with the guns that I have bought for them. Each has a .22 rifle, and pistol, and shotgun, and a hunting rifle. They both do have a real interest in guns and so their "collections" are growing now as well.

JCisHe
July 7, 2009, 10:02 PM
.22 rifle and handgun. That way, if they aren't shooters you haven't spent entirely too much on something they hate, and if they are shooters they have something to practice with and then they can purchase the big guns of choice later. Don't forget to teach them the value of hard work to get the things you need and want!

cmfireman
July 7, 2009, 10:09 PM
I am still young, but I have a Ruger P89 my grandpa gave me, a CZ 452 .22 LR my wife bought me as a wedding present, and a Remington 870 Express that my Mother bought me when I was 13.

I will never sell any of these guns, and will pass them down to keep them in the family.

GodGuns&Guitars
July 7, 2009, 10:12 PM
This hits pretty close to home for me right now. I was diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma back in January and had to have my right kidney removed and I have a place in my neck that is still there with it. I go through the drugs etc., and seem to be holding my own for now. God willing He'll give me a few more years to make up my mind. I don't have any children of my own, but through the relationship I have now there are three kids, adults, and seven grandkids. My plans at this point are to give my brother one of my 1911's with his name etched on it. My closest friend will get another 1911. The seven grandkids will each get a 22 of their own. Their names will also be laser etched on them. What they do with them after I'm gone is up to them, but I hope at least some of us get to go shoot before I have to leave early. As for my other weapons, I have some ideas. One will go to a New Mexico state trooper, another to an Arkansas state trooper. I have made no decision on what will happen to the others.

That being said, I plan on fighting this tooth and nail all the way. So far things look pretty good and have an oncology appointment tomorrow. Last scan they did showed no growing and no spreading. Please, no "I'm sorrys" and all that kind of stuff. If you want to do anything just say an extra prayer if you have one laying around.

Quoheleth
July 7, 2009, 10:18 PM
I like this thread and I like the idea. I inherited a couple of dad's guns (had to share with my brother) and a couple of his dad's guns (ditto, the sharing). None are golly-whopper storied guns (i.e., WWII battlefield weapons), but they have family stories. Best of all, Deo volente, they will one day be 3-generation weapons. The old Winchester '97 12 gauge doesn't get much play time anymore, but it stands next to the Savage 15A that both Dad and I learned to shoot with. Dad's first full-time paycheck bought him a Winchester 250 leveraction .22 which stands next to my Browning BL22 that I bought in 8th grade with lawn mowing money.

If I were to pick "heirloom" guns, I might suggest Ruger Single Six or a .357 Blackhawk, the 1911 (any manufacture of good reputation), Smith Model 10 or 15, Browning HP, possibly a CZ 75 or 85 (not quite the history, but still a damn fine firearm), a Marlin or Winchester .30-30, any nice O/U shotty.

The list is endless, but those are some that pop to mind.

Thanks for the walk down memory lane.

Q

AirplaneDoc
July 7, 2009, 10:33 PM
My dad gave me a US Springfield trapdoor 45-70. Then felt bad about it and gave me a 1903 Springfield because he thought it more practical. Both the same day about 6 hours apart.

I would pass on what ever firearm my son or daughter really enjoyed shooting with me.

benEzra
July 7, 2009, 10:41 PM
A 1911, an AR, and a .22 sound like a good plan to me.

halfbreed808
July 7, 2009, 10:52 PM
I think about this subject every week. At first I was going to divide the collection between my boys. The older one messed up and can't possess any firearms, so now the girls get their share. Which is how it should've been in the first place. Guess my fathers old school thinking got in the way of my better judgement. Heck, the girls shoot better anyway.:neener:
They've already picked what they want, and I have their wish lists.:D

NC-Mike
July 7, 2009, 11:30 PM
My oldest child and only son is 18. I bought him a Mosin Nagant 91/30 in 06 and a No 4 Mk1 in 08.

After he turned 18 we drove down to the CMP South Store and I got him a very nice M1 Garand and equally nice M1 Carbine.

He's a very good kid, never in trouble and in process of signing into the service. His guns will stay secured with me for the time being but they are his rifles.

huntsman
July 7, 2009, 11:50 PM
I gave each of my sons a .22cal rifle and a 12 gauge shotgun.

cchris
July 7, 2009, 11:57 PM
The key is teaching them to responsibly own a gun, and not to talk about shooting it in any manner other than intended (i.e. only at a person who is threatening your life).

I don't have kids, but I plan on teaching them (if I do have any) that guns are for killing game or shooting at targets - until they're old enough to need one for personal protection. For my parents, this was the point where I lived on my own.

IMO, the guns should be kept locked away and not accessible. The reason I say this is because a 17 year old kid who I recently dismissed from work for sleeping on the job spent three years in jail for shooting someone. He offered me money for my guns, then said he was going to get a "choppa" (street slang for AK-47, since most street people don't know of any other assault rifles). He shot someone once, and talked about "shooting up" people at work. This is the kind of crap I want to keep my kids (again, if I have any) from ever speaking of.

NC-Mike
July 8, 2009, 12:06 AM
The key is teaching them to responsibly own a gun, and not to talk about shooting it in any manner other than intended (i.e. only at a person who is threatening your life).

I don't have kids, but I plan on teaching them (if I do have any) that guns are for killing game or shooting at targets - until they're old enough to need one for personal protection. For my parents, this was the point where I lived on my own.

IMO, the guns should be kept locked away and not accessible. The reason I say this is because a 17 year old kid who I recently dismissed from work for sleeping on the job spent three years in jail for shooting someone. He offered me money for my guns, then said he was going to get a "choppa" (street slang for AK-47, since most street people don't know of any other assault rifles). He shot someone once, and talked about "shooting up" people at work. This is the kind of crap I want to keep my kids (again, if I have any) from ever speaking of.


This 17 year old you speak of has SERIOUS issues. That is not just a kid who hasn't been taught correctly, that is a ticking bomb.

If your kid doings even remotely resembles that kind of behavior, you need serious professional help.

22-rimfire
July 8, 2009, 12:14 AM
I'd give them each a 22 rifle. From that point on, it's on them. Young people appreciate things more if they have to work for what they have. I feel it is really important to start them on the right path as best you can, but ultimately, they choose their own path.

KenWP
July 8, 2009, 12:21 AM
I pondered this a few years ago. My Grandfather gave me a 22 when I was a kid but now with the stupid gun laws we have in this country if I gave my grandchildren a gun I would make a criminial out of the both of us. Me for giving a gun to a minor among other charges and my grandchild for haveing a gun in his posession that he's not legally able to own due the the registration problems. Most I could do is have it in my posession and say its yours when you get old enough and get a gun license and then we can transfer it over to you. Takes all the fun out of being a Grandfather and a kid.

AWorthyOpponent
July 8, 2009, 12:24 AM
While I don't have any kids, this thread made me think of the handgun that my father gave me before he died. It has been passed down 5 generations (including me) and I will one day pass it down when I have kids. Now ill be looking at it for the next hour, remembering all the good times, giving it its bi-monthly bath...

21bubba
July 8, 2009, 12:25 AM
According to my daughter, all of them.

kamagong
July 8, 2009, 12:25 AM
Thanks for the input all. Keep it coming, this is good stuff.

I want to clarify that I want to get them their own guns. I understand the value of passing down my own weapons, but the kids will get them eventually. I'll be keeping my weapons till the day I die. I'm taking about guns that I'll give them on their 18th birthdays. At that age I will be sending them out into the world, whether it's college, the military or whatever. I want to make sure they have the tools to defend themselves.

AWorthyOpponent
July 8, 2009, 12:43 AM
Get them an AR. I'm 21 and thats the one that I would want. Might not be the most practical for hunting big game, but it is still an eye catcher. I would say that you should talk to them first and see what they want. Get them something that they will enjoy so that they shoot it for fun, but can still use it for protection (i think the AR is the best all around choice, tho im sure there will be a debate about this). If you get something that you like, they may not use it, loosing any interest they have in shooting when they move away.

Plus, most people recognize the AR, and if he/she can get their friends interest in firearms, that's just another +1. If they are going to college, make sure they live off campus. Many universities do not allow weapons on campus. Kinda violates the rights of those that live on campus, but that's another matter...

stickhauler
July 8, 2009, 12:51 AM
A Garand and a carbine? You sir deserve to be named Father of the year, I can think of no better choice of firearms to see to it your son had. And from the rest of your post, clearly you raised the young man right if he's considering serving his country.

I plan to do the same with the grandchildren, one of my son's screwed up and can't own firearms, the other is suffering from poor health and I doubt he'll outlive me. The daughters seem to not be interested in firearms. But I'm teaching the younger ones to love them, so when I do pass on, I'm sure the fight will be intense for grandpa's gun safe.

Larry Ashcraft
July 8, 2009, 12:55 AM
My dad's most prized possession was his pre-64 Winchester 300 Win Mag (originally a five digit serial numbered 30-06 he had re-chambered in 1963). He never saw fit to give it to any of his boys so the three of us had to decide who got it.

I ended up with it, and I immediately called up my son and told him to come get it. I don't want my kids going through that.

Hand down the guns while you are still able. I have given away several, and plan on giving away a lot more before I leave this place.

MovedWest
July 8, 2009, 03:56 AM
I ended up with it, and I immediately called up my son and told him to come get it. I don't want my kids going through that.

Hand down the guns while you are still able. I have given away several, and plan on giving away a lot more before I leave this place.

+1 on handing down while you're around

I am 4th generation shooter in my family and have had a couple firearms passed down. One is a 3 screw Ruger Super Single Six that dad bought new and did some custom trigger work and gold plated the hammer and a few screws himself. The other was a Stevens .410/22LR over under that my mother's father gave to her on her 16th birthday in 1947 so she could go hunting with him.

Having them give these to me and knowing they wanted me to have them meant so much more to me than if I were to go settle their estate and "collect" them upon their passing.

-MW

possom813
July 8, 2009, 04:25 AM
I was given a J.C. Higgins 101.7 sxs .410 for my 14th birthday. It belonged to my mom for years.

I was given a Remington 740 .30-06 that I believe is truly possessed by someone that hated me at some point. I was given this as the leftovers when my mom passed and my dad passed out all the guns to my half brother. He passed in May and now I have a snowball's chance in hell of ever seeing any of my mom's guns again because his wife can't stand me.

Back on topic, those are the only two I was ever given, I did swap a Norinco SKS to my dad for a Security Six, ss 6" barrel. It was later taken from my truck by someone that had to know it was there. Only reason I say that is because it was under the seat, holstered and tied to the springs way up under the seat.

However, my daughters will both be getting all of what I have. It makes it simple that way. My oldest daughter(6 now) has already laid claim to my 336, the younger(2 now) hasn't had the chance, but she does seem partial to the Mountain Gun.

I figure by the time they're ready, and they damn sure won't get the majority until they're financially stable simply because I don't want them to make the same mistakes that I did, they should each be getting a .30-30, a shotgun, .22 rifle, and probably something in 9mm or .40 caliber.

m_kirk2001
July 8, 2009, 06:20 AM
If everything goes as planned (which it rarely seems to do) I will give my children a single shot .22LR bolt action rifle, and eventually a revolver of their choice. Everyone needs a .22LR, and a revolver is so often overlooked in favor of the modern autoloaders that I want to make sure the function and purpose of a timeless design is not lost in the fray.

huntsman
July 8, 2009, 10:06 AM
I'm taking about guns that I'll give them on their 18th birthdays.

I wouldn't wait that long, mine were 13 and 15 when they got their .22 for Christmas and the shotguns came a year latter.

We are hunters so I had a few seasons of hunting with them before the craziness of high school and collage, but still it went by to quickly I wouldn't trade that time for anything.

Bailey Guns
July 8, 2009, 10:29 AM
I've got two sons, both in their mid-twenties. I, too, have already started the process of passing on a few things that hold a particular interest to me. And, I like doing it now because I want to be around for a while to see them enjoy the stuff.

Unfortunately, my dad was more interested in drinking than building a relationship with his kids. Even though he didn't have anything of real monetary value (gun-wise) when he died, there were some nice older pieces I'd love to have now simply for their sentimental value. But, our relationship being what it was, all I got when he died was a phone call. No do-overs in real life.

I certainly don't want to have that sort of relationship with my own kids. That's one reason I've already started the process.

I've already passed on to the oldest:

1949 Vintage, mint Win 94 in .30-30
Very nice Yugo SKS
.22 rifle (don't remember which one)
Locking steel cabinet for storage


To the youngest (AF - active duty) I've given:

Kimber Warrior
DPMS Carbine


The youngest was awarded a Bronze Star w/Valor a few years ago. I've got a collector grade M1 coming (sometime?) from CMP that's for him...he doesn't know it yet. The oldest will get my other M1. I'm thinking that'll happen on my 50th.

CoRoMo
July 8, 2009, 10:31 AM
What guns should a father give to his children?

Eventually, you'll need to give all of them to your kids, unless you want to be buried with them or sell them all off to fund your last few days.

Until then, I'll probably only give each kid a long gun or two. Something cheap like my first gun. I don't want them pawning their $1,000 Browning to fund a drug habit they picked up in college. Or worse. Call me cynical, but I don't know what kind of adult their going to be until they turn thirty.

Ditchtiger
July 8, 2009, 10:42 AM
I've 5 kids, youngest is 18. They have each asked what gun they want and after that the guns will be lined up and they will that turns choosing until all are gone.

TiredOleMan
July 8, 2009, 11:44 AM
I taught both my boys to shoot using the same Marlin .22 I learned with & which I'm passing on to my grandson. My oldest son never had an interest in guns so he doesnt really care if he gets any or not. Once I'm gone they can decide what to do with my small collection, I just made it plain to everyone not to let someone get them that wont appreciate them.

trickyasafox
July 8, 2009, 11:54 AM
whatever you choose, I agree you should use the gun. Make memories with the your child about shooting it and hunting with it. Thats how a family heirloom gets started.

BHP FAN
July 8, 2009, 11:59 AM
I gave my son a Colt 1911,made in 1913.

Stirling XD
July 8, 2009, 12:16 PM
For those of you that are planning on passing down "heirloom guns", let me make an additional recommendation. Take some time and write down the history of the gun. When, where and how you acquired it. What propmted you to buy that particular gun and that particular caliber? How much did you pay for it? How have you used it over the years? Did you ever use it in self defense or take a trophy animal with it? Give your kids an idea of how much and why you value it the way you do. It will give them a greater appreciation for the guns you are passing on to them.

My dad and grandpa have both done that. Most of the stories are pretty mundane, but a few are pretty interesting.

searcher451
July 8, 2009, 12:21 PM
I just gave my son a LNIB Interarms-made Walther PPK/S for his birthday to use as his carry gun during the summer. I gave him an old model Ruger Bearcat two years ago for Christmas (his great-grandfather had a hand in the design). I also gave him a Marlin lever-action .22 rifle for his birthday a few years back. In time, seeing as how my daughter has no interest, he'll get them all, I guess. Thamkfully, he has the bug. I'm sad for those whose offspring do not.

onlymeself
July 8, 2009, 12:26 PM
We have given all 3 of our boys hunting rifles. The oldest we gave a 30.06 and the 2 younger 7mm magnums.
They will always be able to feed themselve and their families.
We also gave our daughter-in-house a .22 rifle. Her dad is giving her the choice of a 9mm, .40 or a .45 handgun.
We have also given the 2 younger ones .22 rifles and .22 revolvers. Everytime we go to buy something for the older son, he has already bought it himself.
For christmas we're think AR's for the younger ones, a shotgun (maybe) for the daughter-in-house, and a revolver (maybe) for our oldest. When the younger ones grad from high school they'll probably be given handguns.
I want them to always be able to feed themselves and protect themselves.

DawgsFan_07
July 8, 2009, 12:34 PM
Just got my little brother (11 years) a rossi .22lr/.410.

runrabbitrun
July 8, 2009, 12:35 PM
I have a son who will get all my guns one day.
We enjoy them all together now.
The day he decides it's time to fly the coup,
he will get at least one handgun and one long gun to go.

I know he will want the my Browning HP 9mm and the SKS.
Ha... he will have to wait for those and just deal with the 22 pistol and the Marlin 60.

If he decides to CCW, he will have to outfit himself with his preference
from a reputable dealer or from a p2p purchase.

kamagong
July 8, 2009, 02:32 PM
There have been a lot of great responses so far. At this point Iím leaning towards setting aside a 1911, AR lower (to be built up however he/she wants), and a good .22 rifle for each kid.

I know that some of you say that I should pass down my firearms while Iím still alive, but I donít think I can do it. Iím still a young man at 32, and if I pass down my firearms when the kids turn 18, I wonít have anything myself. I plan on keeping them until I can no longer shoot them, and each gun will be willed to a specific individual. Of course my kids and grandkids will be able to shoot whatever they want anytime they want. Itíll be during these times that Iíll determine who gets what, as one kid may want the Baer, another the Hi-Power, and so on and so forth.

esq_stu
July 8, 2009, 02:38 PM
I gave my son a new 9mm Baby Eagle when he turned 21.

My kids shot with me when they were teenagers but I didn't give them guns then.

scneck
July 8, 2009, 02:48 PM
According to my 14 year old son, he has a nice collection of guns.

I have only 1, my 1911.

Fine with me.

cuervo
July 8, 2009, 04:47 PM
KarenTOC
The downside is, each time your wife gets pregnant, you'll have to add a gun to your have-fun-with-dad collection so you'll have a gun to pass on to the new kid. It's a sacrifice, I know, but that's what fatherhood is all about

I'm in that boat right now. :)

I plan to teach each on a .22 that I already have. At some point, one off those .22s will just become theirs to take with every time to the range.

And, hopefully, when each gets old enough, we'll go to the store together and pick out a 20ga together and let that be their first new gun. After that, they can take over an existing 12ga if they want.

inclinebench
July 8, 2009, 04:58 PM
I have a 4yo and a 2yo, both sons. I bought a single shot Rossi 22/20ga for when it is time to teach them to shoot. If they like shooting and hunting, then I will start by letting them borrow my guns to shoot and hunt, and if they want to own more, they can work for the money to buy what they want. I will begin to hand down my guns while I am alive, but I do want them to purchase their own, with money they earn. I think that teaches them the value of working for what you want. Additionally, I hope that in buying them themsleves, they will learn the value of taking care of an investment. As they show me that they have the mettle, I will hand down my own guns. I do plan on buying each a 1911 as they turn 21. I got my first 1911 when I turned 21, and I think that should be a family tradition.

Skillet
July 8, 2009, 05:33 PM
my first experience with a gun that actually fired, was when i got a daisy buck bb gun. my dad took me out to the back yard, set up a target on a piece of standing cardboard, and drilled gun safety into me.
i was about 8 years old.
it has stuck with me ever since and now gun safety is habit.
i suggest doing something like that.

yokel
July 8, 2009, 07:35 PM
I just want to make sure that my children are equipped to face any physical dangers they may encounter.[Emphasis added]

So, what weapons and equipment should be available to your children in times of war and conflict?

The basics are the small arms weapons used by the individual infantryman such as revolvers, pistols, submachine guns, carbines, assault rifles, rifles, sniper rifles, squad automatic weapons, light machine guns, and sometimes hand grenades.

expvideo
July 8, 2009, 08:22 PM
I'm not a father yet, so I guess my two cents isn't worth much, but from my relationship with my father and my own opinions, I think that it will go something like this when I do have kids (ages just a rough idea, it will depend on maturity):

8 - a pocket knife, along with lessons in survival and lots of cub scouts kind of outings.

9 - a fixed blade knife with a lot of camping and more life lessons regarding survival.

10 - a bb gun with basic marksmanship lessons and gun safety lessons.

11 - a bb pistol with basic marksmanship lessons and safety lessons.

12 - a single shot .22lr rifle with open sights along with all of the instruction and what-not.

13 - a multiple shot or semi-auto .22lr rifle with basic instruction.

14 - a hunting rifle with hunter safety classes and hunting trips.

15/16/17 - a .22lr pistol with instruction

18/19/20 - a shotgun for home defense of first apartment, no instruction should be needed at this point

21 - a centerfire pistol of some sort to go with the CWP

I think it's really a guy/girl's responsibility to take care of their own weapon needs at that point.

I think thats's the general progression of gifts and instruction I'll give my kids. I guess we'll see if it actually works out that way.

mongo4567
July 9, 2009, 12:09 AM
I have two guns that belonged to my father: a lever action rifle and a .38 revolver. My son is 9. I've given him a Cricket .22 and a Rem 870 youth 20g. I'm sure he'll get more over time. He loves the SKS, it may be next.

jbkebert
July 9, 2009, 12:57 AM
My oldest son who is 9 got a remmy 870 wingmaster 28ga for his 9th birthday and will be getting a henry .22lr here in a few weeks for his 10th birthday. My youngest son who is 8 will be getting a 870 wingmaster 28ga in Oct for his birthday and a .22lr next year. The girls who are 2 and 3 aren't ready just yet. I also plan on building each of my kids a gun cabinet in either Walnut or Cherry. They all have a toy box and a china cabinet built by dad to hopefully last them for years and years.

Quilbilly
July 9, 2009, 02:29 AM
My wife is due on Dec. 30 with our first baby. He/She is getting a .22 for his/her first birthday. Just which one is the problem...

doc2rn
July 9, 2009, 03:44 AM
My dad went in halves with me on my first gun a Ruger Standard that I still have. It has to be aproaching the 600,000+ mark. Still goes with me everywhere just like when I was 11. I bought an identical one for my daughter but she likes my shotguns better; so she is getting her pick plus one. I already gave my brother his (SP101 and SxS 12g), same with dad (Colt .45 and Moss 500), so now just have nephew.

General Geoff
July 9, 2009, 03:47 AM
What guns should a father give to his children?

Eventually, all of them.

FireArmFan
July 9, 2009, 04:28 AM
Kamagong, if I remember correctly and you are the one with that beautiful Les Baer with the custom grips then I say that is the perfect gun to hand down to a child (when you are done with it of course).

Coopersrcool
July 9, 2009, 08:44 PM
I had a Cooper built with French Walnut and my daughters name and birth year as the serial number. Cooper will do custom serial numbers. She has a cricket now but knows the Cooper is hers when she is ready.

Justice5
July 9, 2009, 10:57 PM
My dad recently passed down to me around 14 guns, mix of rifles and handguns. His only request for me in having them, is to pass them down to my children one day, which now my seven year old has his first .22 rifle, that my dad bought for $8.00 when he was 14 years old. It thinks its a great tradition and a way teach children about respect for firearms and the part of history they have played in this world. All of mine will be passed down to my children, in hopes that they continue the tradition.

Bill2e
July 9, 2009, 11:06 PM
A shotgun, a 22 rifle, a handgun in at least 357 and a Rifle in a deer caliber 243-up.


Bingo, we have a winner.

870 Pump, S&W (PRE-LOCK) Wheel gun, Chose a Bolt Action .30 Cal Rifle & a 10/22.

Enough to last a life time. (of course one may aquire more if so desired)

Titan6
July 10, 2009, 04:11 PM
I have a simple plan based on age, state laws and maturity level:

6- BB Gun
8- .22 rifle
11- 20 GA shotgun
14- CF Hunting Rifle
17- AR
21- Pistol
(bonus guns for joining the military)

Tully M. Pick
July 10, 2009, 05:03 PM
6- BB Gun
8- .22 rifle
11- 20 GA shotgun
14- CF Hunting Rifle
17- AR
21- Pistol
(bonus guns for joining the military)

That's my plan for now. I've acquired a few of them already, just so there's no problems in the future. I've got a nice RRA AR tucked away for him when he gets a little older, and was looking at this CZ .22 youth rifle.

http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/cPath/63/products_id/31197

I was going to start him off on that next year, but I might do a BB gun first.

NC-Mike
July 10, 2009, 05:22 PM
Shotgun at 11? :uhoh:


That's heavy...






That agenda seems almost wartime.

rocinante
July 10, 2009, 05:33 PM
I will go back and read this thread so forgive me if my two cents has already been anteed. One of my motives for gun collecting was thinking about what I had of my fathers. His college beanie cap and a book on landscaping. Granted he died young and poor but I got thinking about what of mine could be valued. Guns are durable and they can have emotional connections if they participated in events like going to appleseed or shooting. I have about 15 guns and at least with the older son (12) we already have memories over particular arms.

Basically just what you find useful as a man will serve them too. I have two sons. I have one AK and will get another. This one sounds weird but I have one Taurus Millenium 45 and thinking about another. 11 rounds and concealable.

BMF500
July 10, 2009, 05:34 PM
Any thing they desire that the father can afford and is willing to purchase!!!

No really here was my order of graduation:

4-Daisy BB gun
5-Crossman air rifle
6-Savage .22LR rifle
8-Remmington 20ga youth semi-auto
9-Remmington .243 bolt action
12-Winchester 12ga. pump

That was all I was given while under the age of 18. Then I started buying my own. I got a S&W .38 for my 21st bithday. I plan on my son following the same path, more or less.

Titan6
July 10, 2009, 05:38 PM
wartime? :D

Hardly. The 10YO has been begging for the 20 GA for two years since he was first introduced to skeet and trap. Last weekend he broke 15 for 25 with his friends .410. I feel bad for holding out but I also have the wallet to consider also. The ammo is getting quite high. I think you may have lost perspective about what shooting sports are all about.

BMF500
July 10, 2009, 05:45 PM
Shotgun at 11? :uhoh:


That's heavy...






That agenda seems almost wartime.
I recived my first shot gun at 8yo, a 20ga.
My nephew recieved the same model at 8yo.
My yonger brother recivied his .410 at 7yo.

My nephew is 10 and outshoots most 30yo's at skeet and while dove hunting. I think it's great!

Birdmang
July 10, 2009, 05:48 PM
I got a crack barrel .410 from my Grandpa for my 7th birthday. It was my grandmas bird gun, but she stopped hunting. It was good.

SCKimberFan
July 10, 2009, 05:51 PM
KarenTOC had the right idea earlier:

Later, when the time is right, teach your kid how to shoot your gun. Let your kid shoot it a lot, and learn from it, and have fun with it.

SC father faces weapons charge in boy's shooting

The Associated Press

COLUMBIA, S.C. -- The father of a South Carolina boy who shot and killed his 10-year-old brother has been indicted on a federal weapons charge.

The State reported Friday that 45-year-old Gary Travis Roberts of Cassatt is charged with possession of a gun and ammunition by a convicted felon.

Officials say a 13-year-old boy shot his younger brother, Gaylord Roberts, in March because he took his spot watching television. The teen pleaded guilty in May to voluntary manslaughter and is awaiting sentencing.

Gary Roberts is charged with illegal possession of the .22-caliber pump-action rifle used in the shooting. He had been convicted of involuntary manslaughter in 1991 and was prohibited from having guns or ammunition.

He was charged by state officials with illegal neglect of a child. It was unclear if Roberts has an attorney.

http://www.thestate.com

Teach your child the proper handling of a gun. While there should not have been a gun in the house (convicted felon), he still should have taught his children a lot better than this.

yokel
July 10, 2009, 06:23 PM
I think you may have lost perspective about what shooting sports are all about.

If you want a skewed perspective about the right to keep and bear arms, the editorial writers of The New York Times will do just fine.

The Founding Fathers added the Second Amendment to the Bill of Rights to give citizens a defense against the tyranny of the state.

That is the fundamental purpose.

If we leave the impression on young and novice shooters that we think that Amendment II was put into the Constitution by the Founders merely to defend and promote America's hunting and sporting traditions, we will actually contribute to the false view that it is a historical curiosity.

cchris
July 10, 2009, 06:33 PM
How am I even the least bit surprised that happened in Columbia, SC? I'm living in Columbia for the summer...fun stuff...

Titan6
July 10, 2009, 08:31 PM
I don't think my 11 YO will be fighting tyranny with his youth model Remington 20 GA. Not unless they start shooting clays at him.

yokel
July 10, 2009, 09:05 PM
Nevertheless, by the time they are positioned at the juncture of adolescence and adulthood they need to fully understand the context and primary theme of the Second Amendment so they can help ensure that we will remain an armed people, able to defend our liberty.

Titan6
July 10, 2009, 10:39 PM
Yokel they understood that at age 7. I have odd children.... very smart. Our dinner conversations run more along the lines of the concept of infinity and red light - blue light phase shifts of gravitational singularities.

Sport45
July 10, 2009, 10:43 PM
Get yourself a good gun, one you enjoy. Use it now, enjoy it, shoot it a lot and have fun with it. Later, when the time is right, teach your kid how to shoot your gun. Let your kid shoot it a lot, and learn from it, and have fun with it. Then, one day, give your kid your gun. Now the kid not only has a gun he or she knows how to shoot, but it's one that's wrapped up in memories of time well spent with dad.

That's been my plan as well.

TooTaxed
July 10, 2009, 11:23 PM
Give 'em anything you want, as long as it meets 3 criteria, in order of importance:

1. Make sure they are well schooled in the safe way to handle it and care for it.

2. Proven to be reliable, not subject to problems.

3. Ammunition readily available.


For the basic safety and shooting training, suggest you teach 'em on .22 LRs...you can get in a lot of training for next to no money.:p

NC-Mike
July 11, 2009, 01:55 AM
Yokel they understood that at age 7. I have odd children.... very smart. Our dinner conversations run more along the lines of the concept of infinity and red light - blue light phase shifts of gravitational singularities.

Maybe thats why your agenda struck me as... advanced. :)

FiREhAwk
July 11, 2009, 04:15 AM
My first gun was a 20ga break action shotgun when I was 11. Then a 10-22 that I had for a few years (bought a new one several years ago). When I was 15 my parents bought me an 870 express super magnum, a year after that a savage .270. they last gun my parents bought me was a AR-15 that I recieved my junior year of high school. My father gave me his browning A-bolt that I had wanted for years, right before I graduated. I sold the savage when I moved out on my on as I hard up for cash. I wish I hadnt but it was to a cousin so I see it from time to time and its in good hands.

Sport45
July 11, 2009, 06:44 AM
I have odd children.... very smart. Our dinner conversations run more along the lines of the concept of infinity and red light - blue light phase shifts of gravitational singularities.

I agree. You do have odd children. :) :)

punkndisorderly
July 11, 2009, 07:48 AM
You know, it's not really the guns that they will value. It's the memories that go with the guns that they will value. A ratty .22 that they remember learning to shoot with as a child. Or the .30-30 they took their first dear with will mean much more than an AR-15 just handed to them.

Also, don't fall into the "stuff trap" (working extra hours to buy things for them rather than working less hours to spend time with them). Just my .02.

Cowboygunsmith
July 11, 2009, 09:26 AM
It will all depend on when you plan on giveing it to them and at what age. I gave my son his first gun at five (a quality air gun) that he used only when I was with him and for him to learn proper shooting skills. If I were you I would be more worried about teaching him/her proper shooting skills to include saftey and target reconition than I would be the weapon. When the time comes he or she will be excited over what ever it is you give them. Ben there done that!

SCKimberFan
July 11, 2009, 10:15 AM
3. Ammunition readily available.

At this point, there is not many choices that meet #3.

Quote:
I have odd children.... very smart. Our dinner conversations run more along the lines of the concept of infinity and red light - blue light phase shifts of gravitational singularities.

I agree. You do have odd children.

Odd children... or odd parents? :D

Old John
July 11, 2009, 10:50 AM
My old Dad taught me to shoot & let me hunt on the farm, at 12 years old, with an old beat-up 16 ga. single barrel shotgun.......about 57 years ago. He taught me to make that one shot count. I have that old 16 ga. here at home now.
A couple years later he bought me my own, a 20ga. I used it many years.
It was passed down to my older son.
My younger son wanted to start out with a 12 ga.

Each of my boys got their own single barrel and a single shot .22 rifle.
Dad thought that was a pretty good start. Me too.
My younger son turned 34 years old in May. He's an avid hunter, all year round. My older boy will go out for a rabbit hunt with us once in awhile.
All of their kids have learned to shoot.

45Badger
July 11, 2009, 01:15 PM
So far, this is what I've got set aside for each boy (14 and 11)-

AR15 with gobs of mags
M1A with gobs of mags
M1 Garand
Remington 870 Wingmaster with multiple barrels
Bolt action .223
Bolt action .308
Stainless Competition Model (slab side) mark 2 pistol
Glock 19 with gobs of mags
2 1911s with gobs of mags
2 k frame .38
2 k frame .357
1 k frame .22
2 bolt action .22 LRs
Ruger 10/22


Plenty of factory ammo for all. I've got two Dillon 550Bs, and a fair supply of components. Spare parts/springs for most. There are other assorted guns, but these are the core holdings I want each to have as they enter the world.

Ala Dan
July 11, 2009, 07:51 PM
Well, actually I'm going too leave all my firearms to my one and only
daughter; as she is the only child. Its quite a nice, small collection;
well worth the time and expense it took to put it together~! ;)

10-Ring
July 11, 2009, 08:32 PM
I think children should get the stories behind the guns too -- why this gun or that and why it is so special to keep. Now, if you're leaving an entire collection, hopefuy your kids are shooters and can appreciate what they get!

1-UP
July 11, 2009, 08:58 PM
Cripes, are you guys buying $200 basketball shoes every season, new cars for the kid at 16 and then paying their way through college too?

I guess I just like the idea of guns being passed down and/or given that have some sort of meaning/memories behind them. Getting a laundry list of firearms given to you seems to...cheapen the idea somehow.

Not saying that giving somebody a gun as an "atta boy" for graduating high school or whatever isn't a a great idea, because that has meaning. Getting 4-5 guns for hitting adulthood just seems...spoiled.

45Badger
July 11, 2009, 10:06 PM
Cripes, are you guys buying $200 basketball shoes every season, new cars for the kid at 16 and then paying their way through college too?

I guess I just like the idea of guns being passed down and/or given that have some sort of meaning/memories behind them. Getting a laundry list of firearms given to you seems to...cheapen the idea somehow.

Not saying that giving somebody a gun as an "atta boy" for graduating high school or whatever isn't a a great idea, because that has meaning. Getting 4-5 guns for hitting adulthood just seems...spoiled.

Nope on the shoes and cars. Yep on the guns. Hopefully on the college. It's how I choose to spend my disposable income and how I spend a heck of a lot of time with my kids (and soccer, baseball, etc). Sorry if it doesn't fit your idea of proper parenting, gift giving, or financial management. My kids are both bright, do well in school, play nicely with other kids, interact well with adults, and seem pretty happy. Seems to work for us.

I'm not sure I will give them these when they turn 18 (The older I get the less "adult" that age seems). Probably after they settle down and I won't be worried about them selling them to fund a donor-cycle;)

Stormshotty
July 11, 2009, 10:18 PM
I will inherit my father's guns, my children shall inherit mine. So it shall go until the last one dies...

jaholder1971
July 11, 2009, 11:04 PM
I received my great grandfather's Winchester 97 and 1890 in .22 WRF, along with a Colt 1911 and 1903 that we believe he brought back from the Marines after serving on the U.S.S. Houston during WW1.

From my grandfathers I received nothing, which under the circumstances is fine by me.

When my father died I received his M65 3 inch .357 he carried as a detective and later sergeant, as well as the IBM M1 carbine I bought him.

I have no children, my nephews won't get them as one's a child molester and the other's a thug in juvenile detention. Hopefully my 3 nieces will marry shooters.

tdowell
July 12, 2009, 01:54 AM
You know, it's not really the guns that they will value. It's the memories that go with the guns that they will value. A ratty .22 that they remember learning to shoot with as a child. Or the .30-30 they took their first dear with will mean much more than an AR-15 just handed to them.

Also, don't fall into the "stuff trap" (working extra hours to buy things for them rather than working less hours to spend time with them). Just my .02.
I agree, my experience was different than most I guess. My dad and an old uncle taught me to shoot and taught me a love of country, of hunting, and of shooting. Then, when I developed a passion for shooting, my father required me to earn the money to buy me first gun, a Mossberg 500. I'll always treasure that gun because of the work I had to put into it from delivering newspapers and detasseling for a whole summer. There's more blood sweat and tears in the ole shotgun then in my finest AR. Though I'm in my late 30's, my dad is still alive and LORD willing, will be for many years to come. When he passes, I'm sure I will inherit several of his guns, they will mean alot to me, and will go right beside the ole Mossberg. Just my .02

WinchesterAA
July 12, 2009, 03:40 PM
There's something important to remember about all firearms, and all tools...

When they were designed, they were most likely designed by one person, to fit that person's model of what he thinks he needs.

It seems obvious to me, but when I look at tools, I see some dude going through his life then all of a sudden he has a hiccup, and as a result he creates a pump action shotgun, or a bolt action rifle, or a semi-auto pistol, or a lever action rifle.

Some you pull back, some you push forward, some you turn sideways, some you don't really even mess with (break actions), some that are quite simple, like open bolt designs.

These tools are formed by two things, which each have an infinite number of possibilities associated with them -

Designs come from your knowledge of your tools and your abilities, realized or not.

Designs also come from your particular situation.


I think it's entirely possible that two people who have the same tools and the same interests could invent the same thing independently. I think this is true because of the possibilities granted to you by your understanding of yourself and your tools.


It's kinda like a script for a computer, the way I see it. Each choice effects thousands of other choices instantly, and in seconds one idea can grow tremendously.

I've tested my theory with everything I've done. People say you need years of experience and practice to do what I do. With cable installs, my own tinkering I do sometimes produces an item a lot better than I'd hoped for, and with hobbies as well. For example, I took up axe throwing on a whim at a friend's house. until this point, I'd never intentionally thrown an axe in my life. The other day I did, from about 15 feet away. I missed a couple of times at first, but once I hit it the first time, I could hit it all day long. Running, squatting, jumping, going backwards, blah blah etc etc.. these were no longer factors, because I knew how the axe flew. In any given situation, I know how that axe is gunna fly. Picked it up really fast, and I finally got my own target setup so I can throw my own axe at it.



Point in case - I think you can look at your kids personality and realize that if his primary concern at that moment was shooting stuff, he might do it this way.

Or, if you observe your kid running up to threats on a regular basis, without regard for himself or anything else, you might want to get him a shotgun.

Or, if you observe your kid observing a threat before he interacts with it, might wanna get him a good scoped rifle.

The Freeholder
July 12, 2009, 06:53 PM
I have two battle rifles, a pistol, a shotgun and a rimfire for each kid--each one is theirs as soon as they are legal, have a place to to live and buy a proper gun safe.

Titan6
July 12, 2009, 07:52 PM
Good God Badger! Are you adopting 44 YO white men? Because I am available.

mudriver
July 12, 2009, 07:52 PM
I might be a bit extreme, but my boys (age 10 and 8) have 5 guns each already. They've bought 2 each (with grandma's money) and I bought them C&R guns that I thought they could enjoy (Carcano, M95, etc). I think the most I ever paid for a gun was $100 for them, but they cherish each one a lot more than the X-box games they would have got.

I'll split my collection and my dad's with them and their cousins since in my family firearms are heirlooms.

entropy
July 13, 2009, 04:40 PM
What guns should a father give to his children?


All he owns, save for those he deems necessary for his wife's use.

entropy
July 13, 2009, 04:48 PM
Can you be my Dad, 45Badger?

FlyinBryan
July 13, 2009, 05:00 PM
a 22 rifle (ruger 10/22 which he promptly saved his money and put a gm target barrel on)
a 22 pistol (a browning buckmark which is so accurate he likes as is)
a reminton 1100 12 gauge

and next in line will go something like this:

a 16" ar15.
a mosin nagant 91/30
a springfield m1 garand (a cherry)
a 1911 (model still to be decided.)
a springfield m1a national match rifle.

and on my 60th birthday, a barrett model m82 semi auto 50 cal.

the rest will be up to him, but i expect all of the ones i give him to be handed down to my 1 and only grandson.

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