Safely uncocking a loaded revolver


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Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 06:45 PM
Have you ever had to uncock a loaded .38? I know it sounds easy and for many it is easy but you have to be extra careful or it can discharge in the process. Just wanted to share my experience in the hopes it can benefit others. There is a correct way to lower the hammer:

Hold the gun in your right hand (if you are right handed) and hold back the hammer with your left thumb. Be sure to hold it firmly with your thumb in between it and the striking pin so that it can't spring into action. Then click the trigger letting the hammer fall on your thumb. Take your finger off the trigger, remove your thumb from under the hammer and slowly, very slowly lower the hammer into it's resting position.

Be sure to have the gun aimed at the ground or somewhere it cannot do any damage just in case. Now...this is very important. Contrary to what some folks say, you should never carry your gun cocked. In most states it is illegal to transport a loaded cocked gun and there is no reason to do this. It is very unsafe. Here's another thing. If you should ever feel uncomfortable about uncocking your loaded revolver remember this: follow your sixth sense. If you are uneasy you are more likely to screw up. One solution is to contact your local police department. They will be happy to come to wherever you are to assist you at no charge. I live in Arizona and if you fire a gun in the city limits it is a felony and you can kiss all your weapons goodbye for a very long time. Just remember...listen to your sixth sense. Think of all the times you thought "I shoudn't do this." and then you did it and something bad happened and you thought back....I "knew" I shouldn't have done that. Good luck and be safe. ~ Jazz

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ljnowell
July 8, 2009, 07:22 PM
Are you serious? Carrying a cocked revolver? Calling the police to have them decock it? I would also add that in states with concealed carry I dont know of a single one that dictates you cant have a cocked pistol (most people carry 1911s this way).

Zerodefect
July 8, 2009, 07:32 PM
Most people are carrying thier 1911's cocked and locked. Thats the difference. Carrying a revolver cocked is similar to carrying a 1911 cocked with its safety off. In fact based on the few DA/SA revolvers I've shot the unlocked 1911 would be much, much safer.


Thats kinda how I decock my 1911's and other guns with a hammer. I just put my finger in between the hammer and FP. Allthough I have never needed to decock a loaded gun.

So I'm a bit confused? Why would I ever cock a revolver and need to decock it? If it would need decocking later, why would I cock it in the first place?

Shoot my Glocks can't be decocked at all!

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 07:45 PM
Most people are carrying thier 1911's cocked and locked. Thats the difference. Carrying a revolver cocked is similar to carrying a 1911 cocked with its safety off. In fact based on the few DA/SA revolvers I've shot the unlocked 1911 would be much, much safer.


Thats kinda how I decock my 1911's and other guns with a hammer. I just put my finger in between the hammer and FP. Allthough I have never needed to decock a loaded gun.

So I'm a bit confused? Why would I ever cock a revolver and need to decock it? If it would need decocking later, why would I cock it in the first place?

Shoot my Glocks can't be decocked at all!
Thanks for the reply. I know what you mean about 'why would you cock a loaded gun and then need to decock it'. Simple. I live in the city limits in AZ and last night I heard a loud bang/crash in my house. I live alone and keep my gun on the nightstand loaded. It was so startling I was certain there was an intruder. I cocked my gun to be ready. After finding that a picture had fallen off the wall crashing to the floor I was stuck with the cocked revolver. Honesty, I have decocked many an unloaded one successfully but for some reason I just didn't feel easy about it. So....yeah (i'm not embarassed) my local police were happy to come over and decock it safely for me. Actually only one of them really knew how. LOL Now..had I been outside the city limits I would have just discharged it and problem solved. But here they have this law they are very strict about. My neighbors would have called the cops if I had accidentally discharged it. Better to be safe than sorry. It was a first for me for sure. ;)

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 07:47 PM
Are you serious? Carrying a cocked revolver? Calling the police to have them decock it? I would also add that in states with concealed carry I dont know of a single one that dictates you cant have a cocked pistol (most people carry 1911s this way).
Here in AZ it is illegal to carry/transport a cocked revolver. But thanks for the response anyway.

1911Tuner
July 8, 2009, 07:48 PM
Can't really see this one goin' anywhere good...but I'm gonna leave it open until it starts to head south of the border.

Jazz...We 'preciate the sentiment and the effort...we really do, but this board is chock fulla people who have been handlin' guns for the better part of a half-century. Lowering the hammer on a revolver safely is pretty much a non-issue.

Ya'll behave now. Hear? ;)

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 07:51 PM
Can't really see this one goin' anywhere good...but I'm gonna leave it open until it starts to head south of the border.

Jazz...We 'preciate the sentiment and the effort...we really do, but this board is chock fulla people who have been handlin' guns for the better part of a half-century. Lowering the hammer on a revolver safely is pretty much a non-issue.

Ya'll behave now. Hear? ;)
Not a problem. It won't hurt my feelings if you delete it. I just found your forum today and feel it is really cool. I actually grew up on a ranch and have been around guns all my life so I kinda know where you are coming from. Just wanted to share. But no disruption or disrespect to the experts intended. :) ~ Jazz

jem375
July 8, 2009, 07:53 PM
T/C Contenders, Single and Double action revolvers all have to lower the hammer if it is cocked and not fired. Hell, have been doing that for many, many years. It is easy enough if you pay attention and can 2 things at once...:)

AgentAdam
July 8, 2009, 07:57 PM
I would also let off the trigger as soon as the hammer starts to fall in case the hammer does slip and try to make a break for it. Most DA revolvers block the firing pin when the trigger is forward and it still won't go off if the hammer is dropped.

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 08:05 PM
T/C Contenders, Single and Double action revolvers all have to lower the hammer if it is cocked and not fired. Hell, have been doing that for many, many years. It is easy enough if you pay attention and can 2 things at once...:)
Well, since I'm a woman I'm very used to multi-tasking (I don't text message or put on my lipstick while driving, however) but today I just felt uneasy about it and so I felt like sharing in the hopes that someone else who had a similar problem ....I don't feel comfortable with a cocked revolver on my nightstand. The kitty might step on it. Seriously!

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 08:06 PM
I would also let off the trigger as soon as the hammer starts to fall in case the hammer does slip and try to make a break for it. Most DA revolvers block the firing pin when the trigger is forward and it still won't go off if the hammer is dropped.
Oh yeah! Thanks for adding that about letting up on the trigger immediately. I forgot that. Super important. :)

1911Tuner
July 8, 2009, 08:07 PM
Jazz...No harm/No foul. Just wanted to let ya know that before somebody locks onto ya. Some of these guys can be brutal. ;)

I'd love to have been raised on a ranch. 'Bout all we got around here is stables and tobacco farms...and hills.

Welcome aboard, ma'am!

Zerodefect
July 8, 2009, 08:09 PM
Thanks, I guess that is a senerio that would require a cocked hammer. All my revolvers are DAO.

Can't you swing the drum out if your really uncomfortable with it?

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 08:11 PM
Jazz...No harm/No foul. Just wanted to let ya know that before somebody locks onto ya. Some of these guys can be brutal. ;)

I'd love to have been raised on a ranch. 'Bout all we got around here is stables and tobacco farms...and hills.

Welcome aboard, ma'am!
Thank you, Tuner. I know the 'newbie' routine and I am blonde too....LOL

Okay..you have a great one! Gotta scoot now. Thanks so much for the welcome and I appreciate the gentle advice. :)

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 08:13 PM
Thanks, I guess that is a senerio that would require a cocked hammer. All my revolvers are DAO.

Can't you swing the drum out if your really uncomfortable with it?
No, once you have cocked it the barrel won't open until you decock it. And mine doesn't have a safety either.

mljdeckard
July 8, 2009, 08:14 PM
I agree, don't go anywhere and no one is at all offended. (Or if they are they should keep their pieholes shut.) We love to talk about this stuff.

If I use a revolver defensively, I not only wouldn't cock the hammer, I would probably have the spur and the cocking notch removed. I would use it DA only.

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 08:20 PM
I agree, don't go anywhere and no one is at all offended. (Or if they are they should keep their pieholes shut.) We love to talk about this stuff.

If I use a revolver defensively, I not only wouldn't cock the hammer, I would probably have the spur and the cocking notch removed. I would use it DA only.
Thank you so much!!! I'm happy I didn't offend anyone. (I hope!) Actually I wish mine was DA and I have an order in for a new one now. I want to be able to carry it concealed and don't want it hanging up on something in my purse.

Zerodefect
July 8, 2009, 08:28 PM
I'm eyeing a S&W M&P 340 revolver or a 442 for carry with .38spl


Seems like the DA on a DAO revolver seems to be alot nicer than DA/SA guns I've shot.

A friend of mine told me on his Larger revolver he could tune for a better SA shot, but that would mess up his DA a little. Not sure that is true or not, but I'm plesently surprized by the little SW j-frames I rented. (I'm normally an auto/Glock guy.)

http://i584.photobucket.com/albums/ss290/zerodefect2533/MP340Centenial.jpg

http://i584.photobucket.com/albums/ss290/zerodefect2533/442.jpg

danbrew
July 8, 2009, 08:41 PM
Post pics. Of the revolver and the blonde. :D

What kind of revolver? .22, .38, .357, .41, .44, or something more exotic? What did the cop say when he got there?

1911Tuner
July 8, 2009, 08:47 PM
Jazziette...Your double-action revolver has a safety. It's just not one that you can flip on and off manually. It's on the inside, and functions automatically. When you pull the trigger...it's turned off and the gun will fire. If the trigger isn't pulled...it's on, and blocks the hammer, or...rises and completes the connection between
the hammer and the firing pin. AKA "Transfer Bar."

Pay no attention to dan. He's harmless. If a lady wuz to give him a second look, it'd scare him plumb to death. :D

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 08:59 PM
I'm eyeing a S&W M&P 340 revolver or a 442 for carry with .38spl


Seems like the DA on a DAO revolver seems to be alot nicer than DA/SA guns I've shot.

A friend of mine told me on his Larger revolver he could tune for a better SA shot, but that would mess up his DA a little. Not sure that is true or not, but I'm plesently surprized by the little SW j-frames I rented. (I'm normally an auto/Glock guy.)

http://i584.photobucket.com/albums/ss290/zerodefect2533/MP340Centenial.jpg

http://i584.photobucket.com/albums/ss290/zerodefect2533/442.jpg
Cool pics! Actually the S&W 442 is like my .38 only it has the hammer and pink grips. ;) It's a great little gun. I'm partial to .38s. What I have on order is a Smith & Wesson M&P9 - JG. It has pink grips too. LOL I'm such a gurly gurl. :) It's taking months to get some of the .38s here in AZ. I wanted the one I have pictured here but it's the same as impossible to get.http://www.smith-wesson.com/wcsstore/SmWesson/upload/images/firearms/150468_thumb.jpg I think auto-glocks are super cool for guys.

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 09:07 PM
Post pics. Of the revolver and the blonde. :D

What kind of revolver? .22, .38, .357, .41, .44, or something more exotic? What did the cop say when he got there?
LOL Dan. You don't want to get me banned from the forum my very first day do you? hahaha My current revolver is a .38 like the one that Zero posted only with pink grips.

The cops that came didn't say a lot. One didn't seem to know much, in fact I thought he was gonna shoot a hole through my wall. The other one had to show him how. :) They were happy to help. He decocked it and unloaded it and handed me the bullets. Soon as they left I put em back in and put it back on the nightstand. I have no idea why they took out the bullets. ;)

Jazziette
July 8, 2009, 09:12 PM
Jazziette...Your double-action revolver has a safety. It's just not one that you can flip on and off manually. It's on the inside, and functions automatically. When you pull the trigger...it's turned off and the gun will fire. If the trigger isn't pulled...it's on, and blocks the hammer, or...rises and completes the connection between
the hammer and the firing pin. AKA "Transfer Bar."

Pay no attention to dan. He's harmless. If a lady wuz to give him a second look, it'd scare him plumb to death. :D
LOL Tuner. You made my first day here more fun!

Thanks for the info on the DA safety. I really am gone now. Looking forward to coming back here soon.

Have a great one all!

WC145
July 8, 2009, 09:12 PM
Jazz...No harm/No foul. Just wanted to let ya know that before somebody locks onto ya. Some of these guys can be brutal.

I'd love to have been raised on a ranch. 'Bout all we got around here is stables and tobacco farms...and hills.

Welcome aboard, ma'am!

Tempting as it is, I'm going to be good and not going to comment on the OP.

However, 1911 Tuner, I never realized you were from the Lexington area. I used to live in Asheboro and worked at the hospital in Lexington for several years in the early '90s. It was a great place to be, and Lord knows I miss the barbecue!!!!!!!

WC145
July 8, 2009, 09:14 PM
Hey Jazziette!
What kind of radio talk show do you host?

hillbillydelux
July 8, 2009, 09:18 PM
I have no idea why they took out the bullets.

Oh nevermind.

BP Hunter
July 8, 2009, 09:38 PM
Boy, we haven't had as polite and sweet for a long time....a looooong time. It's quite refreshing to have somebody polite on board. Too much testosterone going around.:rolleyes::p

BCRider
July 8, 2009, 09:57 PM
Jazz, a cocked revolver ready to fire in single action is SOOO easy to shoot that it can go off if you flinch at a shadow moving. Meanwhile having to pull the full DA trigger stroke isn't hard to do and it provides protection against a flinch fire event.

For example let's say you somehow forgot to lock the door and a buddy comes by. He finds it open and eases in and calls your name. The name wakes you but doesn't register. But you hear your buddy. You pick up the piece and cock it and wait. He comes down the hall looking for you and turns into the open door. You flinch at the sight of something moving.... BOOM! your buddy is hurt or dead. But if you left the hammer down you have that little bit extra to flinch but still recognize your buddy and ease off the trigger. No harm done. But if it IS a bad guy and you see a weapon you can just keep pulling.

At least that's how I see it..... I'll sit back and wait for the others to shake and bake me now.... :D

danbrew
July 8, 2009, 10:04 PM
Interesting thread, and all true, BCRider dude (and what a nice handle that is, btw), and one that makes me think about my revolver habits. I've recently begun a revolver jihad and am having a ton of fun with them. With the exception of a 640 that I cannot cock and fire SA, I'm very into single action firing. I rarely practice with double action - probably to my determent. I get that a DA pull is the likely outcome of a self defense shooting, so practice is good, but I can't shake the habit of thumbing back the action and taking up the slack in a single action firing solution.

Interesting as I think I've only got a handful of autos (Sigs) that permit a DA mode of operation. Everything else in the safe is a single action experience. Go figure.

Mike J
July 8, 2009, 10:48 PM
This thread made me think about once years ago I went to the store close to where I lived then. The store was owned & ran by an oriental family. No one was in the store but me & the guy in front of me who was apparently a regular customer. When I walked up to the counter I overheard her telling him that two guys had just left,-they had told her they were police-they then showed her their guns but not their badges to which she had replied "I have gun too, See" raising the cocked .38. The problem was she didn't know how to decock it. She handed it to the man in front of me-he pointed it in a safe direction & decocked it. The scariest part of the whole thing to me looking back is she was left in that store-in that area with that pistol for defense-but had never been taught how to use it.

Sport45
July 8, 2009, 11:58 PM
I skimmed through the posts and apologize if this has already been said but it's really not necessary and even discouraged to cock your revolver in a home defense situation. (Unless, of course, it's a single-action revolver and you've made the decision to shoot.) A cocked double-action revolver is just too easy to negligently discharge when the adrenaline is pumping in a tense situation.

Where are my manners? Welcome to The High Road!

Rockwell1
July 9, 2009, 02:55 AM
In most states it is illegal to transport a loaded cocked gun and there is no reason to do this. It is very unsafe.

Can you cite this please?

Guys, I'm sorry but I smell a rat

cleetus03
July 9, 2009, 06:17 AM
LOL Now..had I been outside the city limits I would have just discharged it and problem solved. But here they have this law they are very strict about. My neighbors would have called the cops if I had accidentally discharged it.

Next time just walk outside and wrap a big beach towel around your .38 and Walah, instant poor man silencer................
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Qzd9HIsRWeA/SFicUu0z6MI/AAAAAAAAJQ8/-9aU4dWNVFs/s400/Godfather+Part+II.jpg

Juusst jking.....Welcome to THR, Jazziette:)

danbrew
July 9, 2009, 09:16 AM
Guys, I'm sorry but I smell a rat

Hey, hey, it's a girl. A real live girl. Be nice. Snicker. :evil: I'm still waiting for the pictures.

I still don't understand where the whole talk radio thing came from...?

:D

earlthegoat2
July 9, 2009, 09:25 AM
I have thought about this one myself a time or two and have decided I am just not going to pull the hammer back unless I am firing it in double action mode.

1911Tuner
July 9, 2009, 09:54 AM
Jazz, a cocked revolver ready to fire in single action is SOOO easy to shoot that it can go off if you flinch at a shadow moving.

While I'm in complete agreement that a DA revolver shouldn't be cocked in a tense situation...I think it's amusing that the same folks who warn against it so vehemently think nothing of desiring/requesting a 3-pound trigger on a 1911 pistol that they intend to carry for that same possibility.

Odd...methinks.

JoeSlomo
July 9, 2009, 10:06 AM
As a responsible firearms owner, one should be proficient in the safe operation of the firearm of your choice. Safely lowering the hammer is an example of this...

I highly recommend you seek out and attend professional training on the safe operation of your preferred firearm. Training will increase your proficiency, safety, and confidence that will enable you to better defend yourself in a safe manner.

I would also HIGHLY recommend that you seek out a good IDPA club in your area. There, you will find many kind folks willing to provide coaching, friendship, and mentorship in the safe and responsible use of firearms for both sport and self defense. There ARE indeed ladies out there who participate in competitive shooting, and they would love to have you join them. Participation in competitive shooting is..
1. FUN
2. A good way to build proficiency
3. FUN
4. A good way to build confidence
5. FUN
6. A good way to meet nice like minded folks that are willing to help you improve yourself
7. FUN

Check out IDPA and get out and SHOOT! You will look back at this post and laugh after you have developed the proficiency you need.

Oh, and by the way, did I mention competitive shooting was FUN!?

Good luck.

WC145
July 9, 2009, 10:21 AM
I still don't understand where the whole talk radio thing came from...?

Her profile says she's a radio talk show host.

Chester32141
July 9, 2009, 10:37 AM
I would suggest practicing decocking w/ Snap caps several thousand times until it becomes second nature ...

Chester

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 11:57 AM
Hey Jazziette!
What kind of radio talk show do you host?
Good morning....I see a few more of you have responded to my thread and I'm really pleased. Thanks so much. I'm going to try to clear up a couple of things here for you...hopefully. To begin with...for the last four years minus the last few months I hosted a Radio Show about True Love. It was called Jazziette's True Love Show and I talked about love, "the only thing that really matters". Unfortunately, I had some fairly serious health issues that suddenly cropped up and I canned my show for a while until I could take care of these things. I will be going back on the air in the next few months but not sure when just yet. Thank you for asking.

This is a recent pic of me so you have an idea of who is posting here. It was taken a couple of months ago. No...I'm not singing Kareoke. LOL

http://a323.yahoofs.com/coreid/4a285e68i17aazul7sp1/6I0Nqp47erylVJ7Z2M1hK21bLCnCaj8FCSrw/103/t192.jpg?ciAgMZLBYbkhQDhd

I am going on to reply to a few of the other responses here now. I hope everyone is having a good day.

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 12:00 PM
Oh nevermind.
LOL

I got a kick out of this one. ;)

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 12:02 PM
Boy, we haven't had as polite and sweet for a long time....a looooong time. It's quite refreshing to have somebody polite on board. Too much testosterone going around.:rolleyes::p
Well I have to admit that I just accidentally 'stumbled' in here and kinda didn't know what I was getting myself into. But so far I have found the responses and the members here to be very nice, polite and helpful. I'm very happy I found the forum. Thank you! :)

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 12:06 PM
Jazz, a cocked revolver ready to fire in single action is SOOO easy to shoot that it can go off if you flinch at a shadow moving. Meanwhile having to pull the full DA trigger stroke isn't hard to do and it provides protection against a flinch fire event.

For example let's say you somehow forgot to lock the door and a buddy comes by. He finds it open and eases in and calls your name. The name wakes you but doesn't register. But you hear your buddy. You pick up the piece and cock it and wait. He comes down the hall looking for you and turns into the open door. You flinch at the sight of something moving.... BOOM! your buddy is hurt or dead. But if you left the hammer down you have that little bit extra to flinch but still recognize your buddy and ease off the trigger. No harm done. But if it IS a bad guy and you see a weapon you can just keep pulling.

At least that's how I see it..... I'll sit back and wait for the others to shake and bake me now.... :D
BCRider...you are so right in what you just said and last night I was telling my boyfriend how it really surprised me that I actually cocked my gun because I NEVER have ever done that in a similar situation before. I'm in the process of moving right now and my life is in a kind of disorder so I think that I reacted differently than I normally would. This was good for me to read because during times of stress we need to be even more careful. Right? Thanks for the great advice!!!

1858rem
July 9, 2009, 12:10 PM
snap caps and practice at the range untill its second nature..

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 12:10 PM
Interesting thread, and all true, BCRider dude (and what a nice handle that is, btw), and one that makes me think about my revolver habits. I've recently begun a revolver jihad and am having a ton of fun with them. With the exception of a 640 that I cannot cock and fire SA, I'm very into single action firing. I rarely practice with double action - probably to my determent. I get that a DA pull is the likely outcome of a self defense shooting, so practice is good, but I can't shake the habit of thumbing back the action and taking up the slack in a single action firing solution.

Interesting as I think I've only got a handful of autos (Sigs) that permit a DA mode of operation. Everything else in the safe is a single action experience. Go figure.
Dan...I have never been to a 'shooting range' to practice with SA or DA. I grew up on a ranch and then lived on one most of my adult life before moving to AZ from Texas. I am not a sophisticated gun owner like you guys. But I have always enjoyed the guns I've had and just reading the many posts here on this site make me more aware of how much I don't even have a clue about and also how much fun it would be to get more involved because I think guns are fascinating and my experience yesterday with the cocked hammer did make me realize I need more training. Definitely!!!

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 12:37 PM
Can you cite this please?

Guys, I'm sorry but I smell a rat
Hi. It's okay if you don't trust me. The cops who came to my house told me it was illegal to transport a cocked loaded gun. That's where I got it. Sorry I can't actually "cite" it.

I'm going to cut through all the posts here and shorten this all up since I have an appointment and need to skedaddle soon. LOL

Like I said...I accidentally found this site. Nice site! Great forum. Very cool members.

Thanks to all who welcomed me and for your terrific responses. All of your suggestions are great and I very much appreciate them. I have been wanting to get more involved and I'll let you know more as I do. The last thing I want to do is be disruptive to your super cool forum and I see you are all very involved in what you do. I'm totally ignorant of so many things you say and I admit it.

Again...yesterday after my experience I wanted to post about it. It's just my nature to want to share in the hopes that someone else who might be having a similar problem will benefit. I hope it does turn out to be helpful in some way.

I know I have benefited from all of your suggestions.

Nice to meet you. Thanks for the welcomes and have a great day! I will be back. :)

~ Jazz

1911Tuner
July 9, 2009, 01:52 PM
The cops who came to my house told me it was illegal to transport a cocked loaded gun.

Won't be the first time that a cop was wrong on a point of law. Not all of'em are true gunnies, and not all of'em are experts on firearms laws. A friend of mine once had a reserve Sheriff's deputy try to charge him with carrying a concealed weapon...and the pistol was in the trunk. Lucky for the lawdog that Steve convinced him to call his supervisor to the scene before he executed a false arrest. After all that...the guy still wanted to confiscate the gun. To no avail, though. The watch commander told him "No dice. He isn't in violation of any law. Let him go his way."

GRIZ22
July 9, 2009, 02:10 PM
Hold the gun in your right hand (if you are right handed) and hold back the hammer with your left thumb. Be sure to hold it firmly with your thumb in between it and the striking pin so that it can't spring into action. Then click the trigger and slowly, very slowly lower the hammer into it's resting position.

It sholud read Hold the gun in your right hand (if you are right handed) and hold back the hammer with your left thumb. Be sure to hold it firmly with your thumb in between it and the striking pin so that it can't spring into action. Then click the trigger letting the hammer fall on your thumb. Take your finger off the trigger, remove your thumb from under the hammer and slowly, very slowly lower the hammer into it's resting position.

This would be for DA revolvers.

OregonJohnny
July 9, 2009, 02:36 PM
Regarding the subject of cocking a double-action revolver in preparation for a self-defense scenario:

Yes, it would be much easier to negligently discharge the firearm than if you had to pull a long, heavy double-action trigger. Why do people carry 1911s with 3lb. triggers for self-defense, then? Simple - Rule #3: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET (I'll add that "target" in this situation would mean a clearly identified bad guy).

It's harder to "flinch fire" a single-action trigger at a shadow or your buddy coming in unexpectedly if your trigger finger is outside of the trigger guard.

Research.

Practice safely.

And welcome to THR.

Oh, has anyone mentioned cornered cat yet? If not, here is the link, a great read for anyone, man or woman:

www.corneredcat.com

Vern Humphrey
July 9, 2009, 02:48 PM
Carrying a revolver cocked is similar to carrying a 1911 cocked with its safety off. In fact based on the few DA/SA revolvers I've shot the unlocked 1911 would be much, much safer.
Carrying a revolver cocked is more like carrying a 1911 with its safety off and its grip safety disabled. I can't imagine anyone carrying a revolver cocked -- the very thought makes the hair rise on the back of my neck!

Thats kinda how I decock my 1911's and other guns with a hammer. I just put my finger in between the hammer and FP. Allthough I have never needed to decock a loaded gun.
For 1911s with good triggers, to uncock an empty gun it's best to simply point the gun in a safe direction and pull the trigger. Kimber advises doing this, since manually decocking can damatge the sear and sear notch.

To uncock a loaded gun, first clear the gun. Then drop the hammer on an empty chamber.

1911Tuner
July 9, 2009, 03:28 PM
I can't imagine anyone carrying a revolver cocked

Nor I.

-- the very thought makes the hair rise on the back of my neck!


No reason to be afeered, Vern. Double-action revolvers with either a hammer block or a transfer bar won't let the hammer light one up unless the trigger is pulled and held rearward. Cock a Smith and Wesson, and hold the hammer while trippin' the trigger. Then release the trigger and watch the hammer block move into place as the hammer moves.

Cock a Ruger Blackhawk...a New Model with the transfer bar. Same deal...except the transfer bar will drop out of position as the hammer moves forward.

Not as pricklish as one might suspect.

Just One Shot
July 9, 2009, 03:52 PM
Welcome to the forum.

I'm not trying to flame you but if you have to call the cops to decock your revolver then I would suggest that you seek additional training from a qualified instructor BEFORE you ever load your revolver.

This is considered firearms 101 as far as I'm concerned. Your safety and the safety of those around you is of great importance.

You should be so familiar with your firearm that you can load, cock, decock and unload in total darkness.

If you are not at this level of confidence with your weapon you should buy some snap caps, blindfold yourself and practice, practice, practice until it becomes second nature.

Jamie C.
July 9, 2009, 04:00 PM
Not as pricklish as one might suspect.

Here's the problem though: Anything that pushes the trigger of a cocked revolver hard enough to let the hammer fall will likely hold it back at least long enough to fire a round.

Remember, when the gun is cocked, the transfer bar is already in front of the firing pin, or the hammer block is already dropped. Sure, if the sear breaks, the trigger will simply move forward with the hammer, repositioning the various safety devices as it goes, but if the trigger is actually pulled/pushed on, the offending item has to get the hell out of the way of the trigger - and rather quickly - for the gun not to go *BANG!*.

Tell ya what... just for giggles, take your favorite revolver, and either place snap caps in it, with the primer area marked in such a way as to let you tell if it's hit with the firing pin ( a dab of white-out, or liquid paper should do. ), or load it with primed, EMPTY cases. Then, while pointing the gun in a safe direction ( preferably outdoors or at a shooting range, if you're using primed cases ), TAP the trigger quickly with your off-hand finger, trying not to hold it back.

I'll bet you have no luck at all dropping the hammer without the firing pin hitting the primer. 'Cause that hammer drops QUICK. ;)


J.C.

Vern Humphrey
July 9, 2009, 04:04 PM
No reason to be afeered, Vern. Double-action revolvers with either a hammer block or a transfer bar won't let the hammer light one up unless the trigger is pulled and held rearward.
For shooting, that's true. But to carry a cocked revolver?

rcmodel
July 9, 2009, 04:06 PM
If you are not at this level of confidence with your weapon you should buy some snap caps, blindfold yourself and practice, practice , practice until it becomes second nature. + 1,000.

You should be able to safely uncock any DA or SA revolver one-handed from any position or situation you can get yourself into with it cocked.

If you can't, set in front of the TV and do it about a gazillion times until you can.

IMO: All the things about lowering it with your left thumb while pulling the trigger with your right hand, sticking your pinky finger in front of the hammer, etc. is more dangerous then just uncocking it with the same thumb you cocked it with.

Anytime you get both hands involved doing two different things at once, it takes your primary focus off of where the muzzle is pointed, etc.

rc

Vonderek
July 9, 2009, 04:15 PM
I gotta believe that if I called the cops in the middle of the night to come over and decock my handgun I'd get a much different treatment from the responders!

1911Tuner
July 9, 2009, 04:20 PM
Anything that pushes the trigger of a cocked revolver hard enough to let the hammer fall will likely hold it back at least long enough to fire a round.


Think so? Try releasing the hammer on a Smith & Wesson and letting go of the trigger immediately...then just turn loose of the hammer. Watch the hammer come to a dead stop about an eighth of an inch from full cock. The rebound slide interferes with the hammer's movement.

Dunno about a Ruger DA revolver. I haven't messed with enough of'em to see the inner function...but it would likely be similar. John Browning wasn't the only designer with an eye toward redundancy.

The gun manufacturers are extremely lawsuit shy...and understandably so. They have been for several decades. While they can advise the buyer not to leave the hammer cocked...they can't control what he/she will do after the gun leaves their facility...and the engineers design the guns with that fact in mind. While the gun can conceivably fire if the hammer falls without pulling the trigger...it's not highly likely.

Even the old 1873 Colts and their true modern clones had a quarter-cock notch that was intended to arrest the hammer...unless the trigger is held rearward.

For shooting, that's true. But to carry a cocked revolver?

Vern. Nobody is advocating carrying a cocked revolver, and I'd never say that it was okay to do it. The point was that the hammer being cocked isn't all that likely for the gun go "go off" without warning...even if it's jarred.

Pulling the trigger is the act that bypasses all built-in safety functions, and tells the gun to fire.

rcmodel
July 9, 2009, 04:21 PM
+1

Many of the young Glock-age cops around here would be dangerous with a cocked revolver they had never handled before.

rc

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 04:28 PM
Won't be the first time that a cop was wrong on a point of law. Not all of'em are true gunnies, and not all of'em are experts on firearms laws. A friend of mine once had a reserve Sheriff's deputy try to charge him with carrying a concealed weapon...and the pistol was in the trunk. Lucky for the lawdog that Steve convinced him to call his supervisor to the scene before he executed a false arrest. After all that...the guy still wanted to confiscate the gun. To no avail, though. The watch commander told him "No dice. He isn't in violation of any law. Let him go his way."
Hey Tuner! :) I found this PDF on "legal issues" regarding safety in carrying, etc. firearms in Arizona. Honestly I don't know if it is a law or just a guideline but I agree wholeheartedly about the cops not always really knowing the law. I lived in a small town back in Texas and we had two Sheriffs in a row that were sent to prison for 'not knowing the law'. LOL So I am in complete agreement with you. Here in Arizona we have this Sheriff Arpaijo who one definitely doesn't want to mess with, right or wrong. ;)

As for toting your gun around cocked I suppose that from what I'm reading the 1911s are a completely different matter and it is considered common practice to do this.

I really do appreciate the advice and I don't take offense to anything anyone has said. In fact just because of this incident and also the responses I have received I am going to the next class available to me for training. I've been wanting to get a permit to carry a concealed weapon for a long time now.

Oh....I definitely need to learn so much more. It's true!!! But in my own defense I will say this (again)...one of the cops that came to my house didn't even know how to decock my revolver. The other cop had to show him. LOL

Btw...my revolver is single action.

Here's what I found:

http://ccw.azdps.gov/documents/firearmsafetybook.pdf

(snippet)

3. Storing Weapons

A. Educate all persons that might have access to a firearm
B. Check all firearms to make sure they are unloaded (look and feel)
C. Store in a safe/secure location
D. Store out of sight
E. Use additional safety devices (cable locks, padlocks, gunsafes, etc.)
F. Never store or carry a cocked revolver

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 04:35 PM
Regarding the subject of cocking a double-action revolver in preparation for a self-defense scenario:

Yes, it would be much easier to negligently discharge the firearm than if you had to pull a long, heavy double-action trigger. Why do people carry 1911s with 3lb. triggers for self-defense, then? Simple - Rule #3: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET (I'll add that "target" in this situation would mean a clearly identified bad guy).

It's harder to "flinch fire" a single-action trigger at a shadow or your buddy coming in unexpectedly if your trigger finger is outside of the trigger guard.

Research.

Practice safely.

And welcome to THR.

Oh, has anyone mentioned cornered cat yet? If not, here is the link, a great read for anyone, man or woman:

www.corneredcat.com
Hey Johnny! Thanks very much for the cornered cat website link. A great site!! I guess we wimmen have a built in mechanism that makes us a lot like cornered cats when threatened. LOL Seriously....I can see it is a site worthy of spending some time on.

Vern Humphrey
July 9, 2009, 04:36 PM
As for toting your gun around cocked I suppose that from what I'm reading the 1911s are a completely different matter and it is considered common practice to do this.
When the M1911 was designed, the functional proponant was the cavalry. For horse cavalry, there has to be a way of quickly making a gun safe -- with one hand, on the back of an excited and possibly bucking horse. Browning initially proposed simply uncocking the gun with the thumb. The Army demanded both a safety lock and a grip safety. FM 25-35 authorized two modes of carrying in combat. Condition 3 (loaded magazine, empty chamber) was preferred. But in situations where the gun had to be kept ready for instant use, Condition 1 (cocked with the safety lock engaged and a round in the chamber) was indicated.

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 04:39 PM
I gotta believe that if I called the cops in the middle of the night to come over and decock my handgun I'd get a much different treatment from the responders!
LOL There are some advantages to being a woman. hahaha

(It wasn't the middle of the night. I waited until around 2 PM the next day after I decided it was less embarassing to call them than one of my friends who would NEVER let me live it down. ;)

rcmodel
July 9, 2009, 04:40 PM
Btw...my revolver is single action.O.K> Tell us more. I thought you had the pink one in the picture earlier.

If so, it is a DA revolver.
That can also be fired SA.

If in fact it is a SA, then you are dealing with a whole nother set of safety rules.

Older designs like the Colt SAA and Ruger three-screw are not safe with a round under the hammer at all.

Tell us what it is exactly and we can steer you in the right direction.

rc

Jamie C.
July 9, 2009, 04:41 PM
Think so? Try releasing the hammer on a Smith & Wesson and letting go of the trigger immediately...then just turn loose of the hammer. Watch the hammer come to a dead stop about an eighth of an inch from full cock. The rebound slide interferes with the hammer's movement.

Tuner, I'm not talking about lowering the hammer... Simply holding the hammer, pulling the trigger, then easing the hammer forward a bit and then taking your finger completely off the trigger is safe. I've done it about a million times or so in my lifetime, with all sorts of revolvers.

What I was speaking about was how safe it is ( or isn't ) to carry a cocked and loaded revolver in a holster, or in any fashion that could allow something to bump, hit, pull, or otherwise move the trigger. ( Quite a few revolver holsters do have the trigger exposed, after all. )

So, try the exercise I outlined earlier and see what results you get. I think you might be surprised.

I know I tried it myself with a Ruger Super Single-Six and a S&W 66, and had them fire the primed cases more often than they didn't.


J.C.

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 04:46 PM
O.K> Tell us more. I thought you had the pink one in the picture earlier.

If so, it is a DA revolver.
That can also be fired SA.

If in fact it is a SA, then you are dealing with a whole nother set of safety rules.

Older designs like the Colt SAA and Ruger three-screw are not safe with a round under the hammer at all.

Tell us what it is exactly and we can steer you in the right direction.

rc
O.K> Tell us more. I thought you had the pink one in the picture earlier.

No...it has pink grips but it isn't the one in the pic. That's the one I WANTED but coudn't get at the time I got this one. I'll get the box and tell you just what it is. brb

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 04:57 PM
Tell us what it is exactly and we can steer you in the right direction.

It took a while to get the box open. (kidddinnng)

It's a S&W 360. This is what the little envelope with the bullet in it says:

Make: Smith & Wesson
Model: 360
Gun Type: REVOLVER
Caliber: .38SP
Serial # *******
Rifing Char: 5 RH

Does that help?

rcmodel
July 9, 2009, 05:05 PM
O.K., your gun is a DA revolver with SA capability.
Or sometimes called a DA/SA revolver.
Or just a DA revolver.

A DAO (Double Action Only) would not have a hammer you could cock.
A SA have to be cocked first before firing. Pulling the trigger would do nothing at all unless you cocked it first.

Your gun is safe fully loaded with a round under the hammer.

It has two redundent hammer block safety systems.
Any time the trigger is released to go forward:
1. The rebound slide blocks the hammer from the bottom.
2. The hammer block inserts a steel bar between the hammer & the frame. You can look down inside the hammer slot and see it in operation as you lower the hammer.

To lower the hammer safely:
Hold it back with your thumb and pull the trigger just enough to release it.
Then take all pressure off the trigger.
Then lower the hammer with your thumb.

The trigger will now go forward under spring pressure and set both safety systems before the hammer can possibly contact the firing pin.

You would have to consciously hold the trigger back while releasing the hammer for it to fire.

rc

NavyLCDR
July 9, 2009, 05:17 PM
Here you go.

http://www.firearms-safety.com/images/main/APC-100Tmain.jpg

http://www.firearms-safety.com/products/apc100/apc100.php?item=APC-100T

Please don't forget to wear your hearing and eye protection.

US military uses a similar device, but ours are usually just a 55 gal drum half full of sand.

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 05:20 PM
O.K., your gun is a DA revolver with SA capability.
Or sometimes called a DA/SA revolver.
Or just a DA revolver.

A DAO (Double Action Only) would not have a hammer you could cock.
A SA have to be cocked first before firing. Pulling the trigger would do nothing at all unless you cocked it first.

Your gun is safe fully loaded with a round under the hammer.

It has two redundent hammer block safety systems.
Any time the trigger is released to go forward:
1. The rebound slide blocks the hammer from the bottom.
2. The hammer block inserts a steel bar between the hammer & the frame. You can look down inside the hammer slot and see it in operation as you lower the hammer.

To lower the hammer safely:
Hold it back with your thumb and pull the trigger just enough to release it.
Then take all pressure off the trigger.
Then lower the hammer with your thumb.

The trigger will now go forward under spring pressure and set both safety systems before the hammer can possibly contact the firing pin.

You would have to consciously hold the trigger back while releasing the hammer for it to fire.

rc
Thanks RC! I have practiced this a few times today and it's really no big deal but it's nice to know about the extra safety systems. Still.....I don't plan on cocking it while loaded again. This isn't really my favorite gun I've ever owned. I'm waiting for my new pistol to come in and wishing now I had ordered a different one. Like the 340 PD. But I just had to have a 9mm. LOL You guys are making me wish now I had ordered a 1911. ;)

BCRider
July 9, 2009, 05:22 PM
Link to S&W technical specs on the 360 (http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10001&catalogId=11101&langId=-1&productId=53915&tabselected=tech&isFirearm=Y&parent_category_rn=15704)

It's a double/single action pistol. Not single action only. So you can just pull the trigger and it'll cock and then fire all in one pull. That's considered as double action because it does two things, it pulls back the hammer and then it release it to fire. Single action is where you manually cock back the hammer and it locks. Then a very short travel on the trigger releases it to fire. When you manually pull the hammer back you'll see the trigger move back as well and then stop just at the point it's ready to release with much less pressure and travel than for a full pull double action.

I'd say the firearms handling course would be money wisely spent. It not only will show you more about your present gun but it'll teach you the basics of the other styles of guns as well. Along with that I'd similarly recomend you buy a set of snap caps and practice like the others are suggesting. You may want to look into a speed loader or two as well.

On top of that a fun way to get some advanced training once you've had your course is to look around and see if there's any ranges/clubs in your area that run speed steel matches for handguns. My own club does this once a month and it's not only a total fun fest but it helps with operating your gun under pressure in both quick and accurate sight acquisition and smooth shooting but also in dealing with reloading. Granted the stress from having someone time your performance is tame compared to a defense situation but the lessons gained under even that small amount of stress will help a lot by becoming habit. ESPECIALLY since most folks will agree that shooting a snubbie effectively can be a real challenge on it's own. I've seen first time shooters with pistols shooting at a 2 x 3 foot target only 5 yards in front of them and only about 2/3 of the bullets even hit the paper let alone the man shaped print. Shooting handguns is something that really does beg for considerable practice. Oh, and did I mention that shooting at the steel disc targets is a lot of fun as well? Yep, it really IS.... It's rewarding as hell to hear the DING! that says you can move on to the next one :D

rcmodel
July 9, 2009, 05:24 PM
But I just had to have a 9mm.???

The more you post the more confused I get.

You bought a .38 Special, so what's a 9mm got to do with anything?

rc

1911Tuner
July 9, 2009, 05:24 PM
So, try the exercise I outlined earlier and see what results you get. I think you might be surprised.

Try mine. You might be surprised. Load up with primed cases...cock the gun...and drop it until you get the hammer to jar off. It won't fire unless there's something seriously amiss in the lockwork.

Smith & Wesson revolvers were my first love, and still are...not 1911s, as might be supposed. That love affair started in 1960 or '61 with a Victory Model that my ol' pappy gave 15 bucks for at Wilson-Pleasant's hardware.

If the trigger isn't positvely pressed rearward, the instant the hammer is released, the rebound slide and trigger move forward, and the hammer block will move upward...or the transfer bar will drop. The rebound slide will interrupt the hammer's fall on a Smith & Wesson. Again...I don't know about the Ruger DAs. I've only owned one, and for a short while. I didn't have time to get cozy with it. Ruger single-actions? Oh, yeah!

Jazziette...The 1911 was designed to allow safe cocked and locked carry. Revolvers weren't.

But...If anyone is that skittish with a cocked revolver, try the advice for folks who are uncomfortable with 1911s in Condition 1.

To wit:

Cock and lock an empty gun and carry it around all day in a holster.

Do the same with a DA revolver. Use a holster that covers the trigger guard. At the end of the day...or a week or a month...the gun will still be cocked.

Her revolver may be DA only, with no provision for cocking the hammer.

Jazziette...Single-action revolvers must be thumb-cocked for every shot...like cowboy-style revolvers.

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 05:27 PM
NavyLt....salutes! :)

http://www.firearms-safety.com/produ...?item=APC-100T
Please don't forget to wear your hearing and eye protection.
US military uses a similar device, but ours are usually just a 55 gal drum half full of sand.

Thanks for the pic and advise about safety. Back home I was in my kitchen one day and had the back door open when a red-tailed hawk swooped down to pick up my baby squirrel off the ground. I picked up my gun and shot it from inside the house. My ears rang for three days so I know just what you mean about the ear plugs.

Btw....I missed the hawk but he missed the squirrel too. LOL

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 05:31 PM
???

The more you post the more confused I get.

You bought a .38 Special, so what's a 9mm got to do with anything?

rc
http://www.smith-wesson.com/wcsstore/SmWesson//upload/images/firearms/220073_large.jpg

Sorry to confuse you. I had posted this earlier...not the pic, but the info. I have this ordered. It's an S&W M&P9 - JG

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 05:38 PM
Jazziette...Single-action revolvers must be thumb-cocked for every shot...like cowboy-style revolvers.

LOL Thanks Tuner! What would I do without you? ;) D~oh!!!!

Okay...mine is definitely not an SA then. hahaha I haven't had one of those since I had my first real gun: a .22 pistol my grandpa gave me when I was just a kid. I loved that little gun. I honestly don't recall ever having a problem with any gun till the decocking incident yesterday. To be really honest...I know more about guns than most of the guys I know here in Scottsdale. It's just the truth. Lots and lots of cityslickers here. ;)

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 05:52 PM
I'd say the firearms handling course would be money wisely spent. It not only will show you more about your present gun but it'll teach you the basics of the other styles of guns as well. Along with that I'd similarly recomend you buy a set of snap caps and practice like the others are suggesting. You may want to look into a speed loader or two as well.

BC....I'm going to join a gun club. A lot of my friends who were never raised around guns are joining gun clubs now so they can get a gun and learn how to use it. It just amazes me how afraid people are of guns here. But then I know how important it is to use precaution. Just reading all the things you guys have posted make me think about all the people out there who have guns and are totally (more even than me) clueless and careless with them. I'm not careless. Honestly I'm very careful. If not I would have never called the cops to help me decock it. ;) But...I do think it will be fun to go to school and get involved in a gun club. I'm a great shot too. I really am. :)

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 05:58 PM
Smith & Wesson revolvers were my first love, and still are...not 1911s, as might be supposed. That love affair started in 1960 or '61 with a Victory Model that my ol' pappy gave 15 bucks for at Wilson-Pleasant's hardware.


Tuner...have you seen this old classic that S&W is making? You need to order this:

http://www.smith-wesson.com/wcsstore/SmWesson/upload/images/engraving/cus/150337_large.jpg

Only $6,500..... ;)

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 06:10 PM
Hold the gun in your right hand (if you are right handed) and hold back the hammer with your left thumb. Be sure to hold it firmly with your thumb in between it and the striking pin so that it can't spring into action. Then click the trigger and slowly, very slowly lower the hammer into it's resting position.

It should read Hold the gun in your right hand (if you are right handed) and hold back the hammer with your left thumb. Be sure to hold it firmly with your thumb in between it and the striking pin so that it can't spring into action. Then click the trigger letting the hammer fall on your thumb. Take your finger off the trigger, remove your thumb from under the hammer and slowly, very slowly lower the hammer into it's resting position.

This would be for DA revolvers.
Griz...I'm going to change my original post to reflect your modifications. Thanks!!!! :)

ronto
July 9, 2009, 06:40 PM
The more ladies with guns the lower the crime statistics...Congradulations and get yourself a pump shotgun for your next purchase...Go Girl!

1911Tuner
July 9, 2009, 07:05 PM
To take it a little further, and hopefully provide a little more understanding of the design...

Dry-fire a Smith & Wesson revolver, and don't release the trigger. Look closely at the hammer...and watch what it does when you release the trigger. Now...Without touching the trigger, try to push the hammer forward again into the firing position. It won't go there. The rebound slide blocks forward movement. This will happen even with the hammer block removed from the gun. The hammer block is a redundant feature.

Do the same with a single-action Ruger with the transfer bar. Watch the hammer when you release the trigger. It will move forward and rest on the frame...but it won't reach the firing pin. When the trigger is released, the transfer bar...the connector...moves downward into the frame, and prevents the hammer from contacting the firing pin.

OregonJohnny
July 9, 2009, 07:41 PM
Jazziette,

I'm not careless. Honestly I'm very careful.


And yet...


a red-tailed hawk swooped down to pick up my baby squirrel off the ground. I picked up my gun and shot it from inside the house.


I don't want to pick on you too bad, but there are a lot of things wrong with this. First, I'm sure it's against the law to kill a hawk of any kind in any of the 50 states. I could be completely wrong, and if I am, my apologies. But almost more importantly, I hope the hawk was not in the air when you shot at it. That bullet is going to come back down to Earth somewhere. Please be careful.

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 07:44 PM
Dry-fire a Smith & Wesson revolver, and don't release the trigger. Look closely at the hammer...and watch what it does when you release the trigger. Now...Without touching the trigger, try to push the hammer forward again into the firing position. It won't go there. The rebound slide blocks forward movement. This will happen even with the hammer block removed from the gun. The hammer block is a redundant feature.


That was really great, Tuner. Until you posted that I really didn't have a clear understanding of how the safety feature worked. That was a very good and easy to follow explanation. Thanks!!!

I really do know I've learned a lot of things from this and still I am a firm believer that no matter how familiar you are with your revolver you should still be very careful when decocking a loaded revolver. No pun intended, but it's when you get "cocky" that accidents happen. Safety devices or no safety devices. After all...fingers can slip..... ;)

But I won't have to call the cops again for sure! :D

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 07:56 PM
Jazziette,




And yet...





I don't want to pick on you too bad, but there are a lot of things wrong with this. First, I'm sure it's against the law to kill a hawk of any kind in any of the 50 states. I could be completely wrong, and if I am, my apologies. But almost more importantly, I hope the hawk was not in the air when you shot at it. That bullet is going to come back down to Earth somewhere. Please be careful.
Johnny....I was on my ranch back in Texas when this occurred. I was a licensed wild animal rehabilitator there and this was a little squirrel I had raised and released behind the house. It took up residence in a hole way up on the trunk of an old oak tree just a few feet from the back porch. I was watching Cuckoo (his name) at the time when the hawk came down and circled the tree where Cuckoo was right at the base going to the ground. It was a very big hawk and I did it to protect my little squirrel I had raised and released. There wasn't a house anywhere near where I shot as I was deep in the country. But I appreciate your concern and know what you mean about the bullet going 'somewhere'. I don't really like killing things to be honest. I don't. But I would do it again under the same circumstances. Where I live now there is a Coyote who comes into my backyard and kills the feral kitties I feed. I wouldn't shoot it but I sure wish I knew some other way to get rid of it. Trapping it is out of the question as the kitties would get in a foot trap and a coyote won't go in a cage trap. Unfortunately even if I did another one would come along.

I don't know if it is against the law to kill a hawk in Texas but I don't think so. I wasn't in the city limits.

Thanks for your post, btw. I am one who can take constructive criticism. :)

OregonJohnny
July 9, 2009, 08:01 PM
Thanks for clearing up the circumstances. It's hard to know all the details of an event from just a few lines on an internet post.

A lot of gun owners, even those who've been around guns most of their lives, don't have the best safety practices. It sounds like you're dedicated to becoming and remaining a safe and responsible gun owner. ;)

raskolnikov_22
July 9, 2009, 08:09 PM
and drop it until you get the hammer to jar off.

That made me grimace. Telling me to drop one of my guns is like telling a mom to drop her new-born :)

Isher
July 9, 2009, 08:18 PM
Jazziette -

It is indeed illegal. The Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918

Is the grandfather document...........

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Migratory_Bird_Treaty_Act_of_1918

As noted, it is Federal law, and if I remember correctly

Fines of $10,000 and up and/or jail time

(Depending on the severity of the offense)

Can be imposed upon the offender(s).


isher

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 08:42 PM
It is indeed illegal. The Federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918

I guess it's a good thing I didn't hit it then isn't it. Even if I had shot it I doubt that anyone would have cared unless I had taken it to a taxidermist to have stuffed. LOL

But I did manage to scare it that day. For some reason this reminds me of a story I heard just yesterday. A waitress had left her job late at night and was waiting alone at the bus stop. She had her hand in her purse on her gun. A guy came out of nowhere and grabbed her purse and was running away. She held onto the gun and shot him six times, killing him. After she had been arrested and had been charged with manslaughter the Judge asked her why she shot the man six times. "Well, when I shot the seventh time it only went 'click'." The jury acquitted her.

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 08:50 PM
That made me grimace. Telling me to drop one of my guns is like telling a mom to drop her new-born

Raskol...I don't think that Tuner actually meant to drop your gun. I think he was just making a point that it is more difficult than one thinks....etc.

I would never drop my gun on purpose. I won't even dry fire it. LOL

Jazziette
July 9, 2009, 08:59 PM
The more ladies with guns the lower the crime statistics...Congradulations and get yourself a pump shotgun for your next purchase...Go Girl!

Gosh! Are there some statistics on this? That's interesting. I would rather have a sawed- off shotgun. I do have a Daisy Ryder BB gun that you pump. But you can't even shoot one of those in the city limits where I live. I am with you on the women with guns. And I think it's great that they have come out with pink grips and stuff for women. Still, most if my girlfriends are terrified of guns. ;)

hillbillydelux
July 9, 2009, 09:16 PM
While I'm in complete agreement that a DA revolver shouldn't be cocked in a tense situation...I think it's amusing that the same folks who warn against it so vehemently think nothing of desiring/requesting a 3-pound trigger on a 1911 pistol that they intend to carry for that same possibility.

Did I miss something????

Nope I just checked and all my 1911's have safety's. And none of my revolvers do.

For a minute there I thought I was loosing my mind. geesh

AgentAdam
July 9, 2009, 10:29 PM
If the gun can only be fired by cocking the hammer ,like a "cowboy gun", then it is single action (SA) only.

If the gun wont allow you to cock the hammer back manually and can only be fired by pulling the trigger it is a double action (DA) only like the 642. DA guns cock the hammer for you as you pull the trigger.

If the gun can be cocked manually or fired while the hammer is down by pulling the trigger then it is SA/DA because it can do both like my 360 chiefs special airweight.
http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/images/sw160360.jpg

I had a hawk around hear squaking at my 3.5lb dog and i would have done the same but it is safe to say that all birds of prey or predatory birds are protected. Of course there are clauses for if you or your property are in danger but that is open for interpretation. I would have been surprised if you pulled of that shot with a snub.

Sport45
July 9, 2009, 10:55 PM
I was a licensed wild animal rehabilitator there and this was a little squirrel I had raised and released behind the house.

Had you wounded the hawk would you be obliged to rehabilitate it? It's a wild animal too. :)

And the world has a lot more squirrels than hawks. But I suppose baby squirrels are cute and hawks are only beautiful. To each his own...

Your revolver probably came with a manual like this (http://www.smith-wesson.com/wcsstore/SmWesson/upload/other/S&W_Revolver_Manual.pdf). On page 22 are the instructions S&W gives for decocking.

2nd 41
July 9, 2009, 11:08 PM
Good thread. We can never discuss too much safe gun handling.

yenchisks
July 9, 2009, 11:29 PM
this happened to me once,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,what i did was throw the gun in the air ran around in a circle and screamed,,,,,,,, then i calmed down walk over picked it up got scared and threw it again ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,ran in circle,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,this went on for some time until the revolver went off putting a hole threw the roof,witch i had to climb up to the roof and fix being I'm an old tough a#% roofer;)

1911Tuner
July 10, 2009, 07:30 AM
1911's have safety's. And none of my revolvers do.

Yes they do. You haven't been paying attention. Your revolvers have built-in safety features that require pulling the trigger in order to fire. They just don't require any deliberate effort on your part in order to function. We're assuming that they're all in good mechanical condition and that nothing is broken, of course.

Jazziette...They're givin' you the straight of it. Killing a raptor is a federal crime. It's even a crime to be in possession of one...breathin' or stuffed. Licensed wildlife rehab organizations excepted. Squirrels and rabbits were born to be food for predators and raptors. That's why they multiply like...well...like rabbits. :D

John Parker
July 10, 2009, 08:19 AM
I'm amazed that this thread has gone on this long. It was really wrapped up in the first ten posts.

1911Tuner
July 10, 2009, 08:33 AM
It was really wrapped up in the first ten posts.

Well...At first glance, but apparently there were at least a couple-three folks who didn't understand the function of a modern double-action revolver...and the thread provided the opportunity for them to gain a deeper understanding of the design. So, it at least served that purpose.

Now, before anybody jumps...let me repeat that I'm not trying to imply that carrying a cocked single or double-action revolver is a good idea. Just that it's not quite as hazardous as some would think.

Jazziette
July 10, 2009, 12:41 PM
If the gun can only be fired by cocking the hammer ,like a "cowboy gun", then it is single action (SA) only.

If the gun wont allow you to cock the hammer back manually and can only be fired by pulling the trigger it is a double action (DA) only like the 642. DA guns cock the hammer for you as you pull the trigger.

If the gun can be cocked manually or fired while the hammer is down by pulling the trigger then it is SA/SD because it can do both like my 360 chiefs special airweight.
http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/images/sw160360.jpg

I had a hawk around hear squaking at my 3.5lb dog and i would have done the same but it is safe to say that all birds of prey or predatory birds are protected. Of course there are clauses for if you or your property are in danger but that is open for interpretation. I would have been surprised if you pulled of that shot with a snub.
Hi Adam! The gun you have pictured is exactly like the .38 I own that I had to have de-cocked, with the exception that it has pink grips on it currently. I've been googling decocking guns since beginning this thread and have found articles stating that "decocking a loaded SA gun is one of the most dangerous things one can do" and urging extreme caution.

Also, in the process, I have found many articles about people being killed accidentally during cleaning of and training others to use safety with their handguns. Yeah, I know these are rare incidents but still I don't think enough safety can be stressed and after reading all the comments here I can see there are definitely different points of view on carrying a cocked SA or DA revolver. I know that most of you can probably handle your guns standing on your heads but there are those who can't and so I think that it's a good idea to post things which are going to wind up on search engines that might save someone's life rather than endanger it.

As for the red-tail hawk incident we all live and learn. As previously stated I grew up on a ranch and then lived on one most of my adult life. Anyone who has done this knows that things happen on ranches that don't normally happen in the city. As an example we had a hawk that found a way to get into the chicken coup. My husband finally killed it. There is no way most farmers/ranchers are going to pay any attention to some of these environmentalist laws. Would he have ever just gone hunting to kill hawks? No...never, but this was one of those times when it was necessary. And me shooting at the hawk that was trying to pickup my squirrel was a natural reaction for a country girl.

Now...before you get all over me for saying the above, let me go on with this: I moved from Texas to Arizona in 1995 and have discovered that city life is very different from country living. I have always been a law abiding citizen and was really unaware that it was against the law to kill a red tail hawk. Still....I honestly don't think I could stand idly by and watch a hawk or owl come down and pick up my kitty or my little dog without doing something. And I don't know one soul who would report me for it. Same thing with coyotes, although they are not protected.

Let me go on, however. I am a lover of nature. I marvel at the beauty of these magnificent birds and do enjoy watching them soar overhead as they are hunting...normally in pairs, as the female and male hunt together. I'm also not the type that has to kill every snake I see or that is in my yard. I would rather catch it and relocate it far out in the desert. I used to say that I didn't understand people who wanted to kill every beautiful wild creature that happened to get in their yard...especially here in Arizona. But under certain conditions I can understand it.

I will admit that if I had wounded the hawk that was trying to get my squirrel I am certain I would have felt horrible and would have had to call my friend, Virginia, who specialized in rehabilitating birds. Virginia would have been really mad at me but would not have reported me. We would have still been friends and she wouldn't have regarded me as a criminal.

Bottom line here: I appreciate those who have attempted to educate me on the law regarding the killing of predatory birds and I also, very much, appreciate all the comments on the safety of decocking your revolver, including other related suggestions.

This has been a great experience for me to post here and to have the opportunity to interact with those of you who are experienced and knowledgeable and fun at the same time.

Thanks again to all. And to Tuner...I know you have never advocated carrying a cocked revolver and all your points were well taken. Thanks so much for all you did to explain the action to me so that I could understand it and be more comfortable while handling my gun.

Ya'll take care now and have a wonderful day!!!

~ Jazz

Jazziette
July 10, 2009, 01:17 PM
PS..I really really really did learn a lot and the biggest thing I learned was how much I STILL need to learn. I think this is a wonderful forum and again just want to thank everyone who so graciously responded to my initial post, which was intended to be helpful. I'm looking forward to knowing you all better and to reading the other interesting and helpful and educational threads here. What a great group of folks! I'll be sure to keep you posted when I start my class to obtain my concealed carrying permit and I also will touch base from now on just cause I feel like I made friends here and will want to stay in touch.

Have fun and be safe!!!! ~ Jazz :)

Sport45
July 10, 2009, 10:37 PM
You have fun and be safe too.

Googling is fine, but be aware that there is a lot of disinformation on the internet as well. I think the best place to start when trying to learn about your gun is the owners manual that came with it. If you have lost your's or it wasn't with the gun when you got it please print the one I linked to or call Smith & Wesson. They'll send you the printed manual for free. It will explain how to operate the handgun as well as how to clean, what ammo is okay to use, etc. For instance, with some of the lightweight snubbies you are not supposed to use 158gr lead bullets because they can jump under recoil and lock up the gun.

As an old country boy now living within spitt'n distance of the neighbors I can relate to that earlier post of yours.

murph50
July 11, 2009, 12:54 PM
Welcome Jazz
I'm more of a pistol person but I do have a couple of revolvers for my wife.
I did learn a few things about revolvers from this thread so thanks for starting it.
As far as the hawk thing.
I am a licensed wildlife rehabilitator but I work only with mammals. I am also on the advisory board for our state rehab assoc.
Yea--the Migratory Bird Act is not some whacky enviro thing. It was first enacted in about 1918--revised in 1932 and again in 1972.
Shooting any bird of prey is a big no no. Big fine and possibly jail time.
Before Bush left office he pardoned a dude who was serving time in a Federal prison for killing several owls and hawks accidentally as secondary kill when he was poisoning coyotes.
Hawk attacking chickens--need to build a better coup--can't kill them.
I know it happens a lot though. My friend Segrid runs a bird of prey rehab facility here and she gets shot and poisoned hawks , owls and eagles all the time.
It is also illegal to be in possession of the feathers from these birds. All dead birds of prey are sent to a USF&W repository which happens to be at the Rocky Mtn Arsenal here in Colo. The feds will sometimes give dead birds or the feathers to native Americans for rituals or ceremonies but other than that it is illegal to be in possession of any body parts of a bird of prey.
Glad you missed the hawk. Scaring them away is ok (as long as they're not nesting with eggs or young) but killing them is a major federal offense.
I really understand about wanting to protect your squirrel though. I have nightmares when I release my raccoons in Mt Lion country but what can you do. The earth is nothing more than a revolving buffet table:D

seeker_two
July 11, 2009, 10:01 PM
I'm amazed that this thread has gone on this long. It was really wrapped up in the first ten posts.

Don't you know anything about the Internet?......why end at ten posts when you can stretch it out to ten pages?.....at this rate, we could even start a Twitter account just on this alone... :D


Jazziette: Any word on when your radio show will be starting? We've never had a gen-u-wine radio personality on THR before.....(well, there was some guy named "Tom" that claimed to have a show, but no one here's ever heard of it.... ;) )


j/k http://www.guntalk.com/site.php

Defintely worth listening to.... :cool:

mbt2001
July 11, 2009, 11:33 PM
safe direction pad. Type it in Google and buy one.

BCRider
July 11, 2009, 11:38 PM
Or a 5 gallon bucket of sand in the basement....

B yond
July 12, 2009, 12:43 AM
safe direction pad. Type it in Google and buy one.

That's pretty cool right there.

RoostRider
July 12, 2009, 02:04 AM
So, what happens to your firearm when you accidentally discharge it into a pad that is in contact with the barrel? and what about all the blowback out the sides of the barrel crown? Not to mention the projectile....

Not so sure I would use one of those... pointing it in a safe direction and decocking/dry firing would seem much safer....

Straight Shooter
July 12, 2009, 08:38 AM
+1 on the Safe Direction pad. I think this is a great product.

Here are some live fire videos from the website:
http://safedirection.com/videolivefire.html

BMF500
July 12, 2009, 08:59 AM
Can't say I've ever encoutered this problem. Any time I've ever cocked a hammer on a revolver, I had intentions to and did fire. Unless the cylinder was empty and I was messing with the action. My carry weapon is a Ruger P345, DA .45ACP. I keep one in the chamber but uncocked with the safety off. It has a de-cocking mechinism built into the safety. If the hammer is back and you flick the safey on, it de-cocks it's self. As far as my 1911's go, I drop the magizine out, eject the live round, and ease the hammer down with an empty chamber.

rmndt
July 12, 2009, 09:41 AM
do you think taurus model 85 is cool too?

RoostRider
July 12, 2009, 01:28 PM
I have an 85, and the hammer cannot be released as stated in the begining of this thread.... the spur is cropped and the hammer is mostly concealed with only the knurled end protruding from the hammer shield.... this gun must have the trigger pulled and the hammer slowly lowered while releasing the trigger.... you cannot get a finger in the way to stop the hammer....

But yeah, it's cool

hillbillydelux
July 12, 2009, 02:49 PM
let me repeat that I'm not trying to imply that carrying a cocked single or double-action revolver is a good idea. Just that it's not quite as hazardous as some would think.

What? Are you serious. Please dont give anymore advice like this. Is is very irresponsible. The way a safety bar transfer is designed to work is to prevent the accidental discharge of a cartridge if the gun is dropped on the hammer (WITH THE HAMMER DOWN). In that respect it does an excellent job. It is almost impossible to discharge a modern revolver by dropping it when the hammer is down.

If a SA or DA revolver is cocked there is no saftey whatsoever to prevent the trigger from being pulled or the hammer from dropping. Any thing that bumped the trigger would most likley keep it depressed long enough to keep the transfer bar up untill the hammer struck it.

Carring a cocked DA or SA revolver is very dangerous and should not be done under any circumstances. I am sure there are others here that will back me up on this.

seeker_two
July 12, 2009, 03:48 PM
Carring a cocked DA or SA revolver is very dangerous and should not be done under any circumstances. I am sure there are others here that will back me up on this.

Agreed....and I would also add that carrying a cocked single-shot pistol is not a great idea, either....just thinking of the T/C and muzzle-loading crowd....

1911Tuner
July 12, 2009, 05:15 PM
Don't sweat it hillbilly. It's natural to be afraid of things that you don't understand. :)

Fore the record...I haven't "advised" anyone to do anything. I'm trying to explain that modern double-action revolvers require pulling the trigger in order to make them fire...and they do. From a cocked revolver...if the hammer falls without having the trigger pulled...it won't fire. Guaranteed.

And...I've said this more than once...

If the day ever comes that I don't have the manual dexterity to safely lower an exposed hammer on any gun, I'll sell'em all and take up needlepoint.

Oro
July 12, 2009, 05:46 PM
The way a safety bar transfer is designed to work is to prevent the accidental discharge of a cartridge if the gun is dropped on the hammer (WITH THE HAMMER DOWN)

+1 to 1911Tuner.

They work with or without the hammer down. The transfer bar safety works this way in a Ruger revolver. It doesn't work AT ALL in an S&W as they don't have a "transfer bar" safety. They have a "hammer block safety." They are different, but look similar at first glance. "transfer bars" do just that - transfer the energy of the hammer to the firing pin at the moment of firing. They are part of the firing system. They have to be IN PLACE at the moment of firing. This is dependent upon the trigger being pulled back because they are on spring tensioned cams. If I remove the transfer bar from a gun, it will NEVER fire.

"Hammer block" safeties work in the same method, but have to be "OUT OF PLACE" to function - meaning there is a positive "block" that the bar makes between the hammer and the firing pin at all times unless the trigger is pulled all the way back. It is not a piece required to make the gun fire. I can remove the hammer block safety from a S&W revolver and it will still fire.

Both are different systems, though related. Both require the trigger back to cam the safety (albeit in different directions - "up" for the transfer bar and "down" for the hammer block type) so the gun can fire. If you aren't clear about this, take an unloaded gun and simulate what happens when say a gun is dropped on the hammer and it jumps or shears the SA notch. In an S&W, you can do this by simulating a "push off condition" - put the gun in SA mode. Hold the hammer with your thumb and release the trigger - and remove your finger from the trigger while still holding the hammer. Now watch the hammer-block safety and the hammer "race" each other to the firing pin window. If you hold the gun thusly, and look perpendicular through the frame window at the indexed cylinder's headspace. Drop the hammer and the firing pin will not enter the window. Once released, the trigger-actuated hammer block will beat the hammer to the window and prevent discharge. This is installed on all S&W revolvers since late WWII.

1911Tuner
July 12, 2009, 07:02 PM
Thanks for takin' the time to type all that up, Oro. Had to jump off and run-go-do. I'm busier'n a cross-eyed cat at a county rat-killin' today.

To expound on Oro's excellent post...

Smith & Wesson's hammer block is a redundant safety device. When the trigger moves forward...which it will do as the hammer falls if it...the trigger...isn't positively held rearward. The trigger, hammer, and rebound slide move forward in unison. When the rebound slide moves forward, it positions itself under the hammer...blocking its rotation...and preventing it from moving full forward into the firing position.

Again...Dry-fire a Smith revolver and hold the trigger rearward. The hammer will move to the firing position. Release the trigger, and watch the hammer. It will rebound into the safety position, and you can push on it until pigs fly...and it won't move forward.

Cock the revolver. Hold the hammer with your thumb and pull the trigger. Let the hammer move forward juuuuuuuuuuuust enough to clear the full-cock notch. Release the trigger...then release the hammer. The trigger will move forward, and so will the rebound slide...which will stop the hammer in its rebound/safe position....and the gun will not fire.

Go study up on it and report back, hillbilly. We'll stand by.

hillbillydelux
July 12, 2009, 10:12 PM
You are missing the point. I fully understand how the revolver safties work in Ruger and Smith. My point is if the hammer is cocked and something accidentally pulls the trigger the gun will go bang. There are no safties to stop the trigger from being pulled by accident. I also understand that with your thumb on the hammer you can just flick the trigger and let off and even if the hammer slips it will not go bang. However if your thumb is not on the hammer and something trips it it could very well go off. You feel so strongly about the transfer bar keeping the gun from going off if the trigger is just bumped but I bet you wouldnt load a cylinder full of live ammo and point it at your foot and practice flicking the trigger to find out would you?

Point is it is not safe in any way to carry a cocked revolver. There are too many things that could accidentally bump pull or catch the trigger and the gun could go off.

1911Tuner
July 13, 2009, 11:51 AM
My point is if the hammer is cocked and something accidentally pulls the trigger the gun will go bang.

Yes...We completely understand that, lad. You keep missing or ignoring MY point. Several times, I've repeated that the trigger MUST BE PULLED in order for the gun to fire, and if it's not pulled and held to the rear...it won't fire.

It has never been my position that it's okay or acceptable to carry the gun cocked and holstered. Ever.

That wasn't the discussion topic anyway. The original question was how safe or dangerous it is to lower the hammer on a revolver. My point has been to explain how the gun functions...period...and that if the trigger is released while the hammer is being lowered...it won't fire, even if the hammer should slip from one's thumb.

Somehow...somebody...somewhere took that to mean that I was advocating cocked carry with a revolver. I'd suggest that rather than reading every 3rd sentence in a technical post...that it all be read and understood before launching into a tirade.

So...for the record, I'll state it again. Pulling the trigger is what makes the gun fire. If it's NOT PULLED...the gun won't fire.

Theah! Now we can be friends again.

1911Tuner
July 13, 2009, 01:52 PM
And for my next demonstration! :D

Those handloaders who have a Smith & Wesson revolver...

Load a primed case into the gun and index it so it'll be under the hammer.

Cock the hammer.

Using a screwdriver...bump the trigger until the hammer falls.

The primer won't fire.

Why?

Because the trigger will move forward with the hammer...which means that the rebound slide also moves forward and arrests the hammer before it can reach the firing position.

As you were. Ill be in the area all day.

mbt2001
July 13, 2009, 03:41 PM
Not so sure I would use one of those(safe direction pad)... pointing it in a safe direction and decocking/dry firing would seem much safer....

They are a SAFE DIRECTION. The are made our of kevlar with plates and everything. If the gun goes off, the bullet goes into the pad. It doesn't ricochet or go through a wall or anything. Just discharges into the pad, the kevlar "catches" the bullet.

Vonderek
July 14, 2009, 12:25 PM
This is funny. Does anyone honestly believe that a thread about decocking a revolver would run 100+ posts if the author were not a friendly blonde female?

Okay, I guess I'm one to talk...have contributed 2 of the 100 posts so far.

Jazziette
July 14, 2009, 05:45 PM
This is funny. Does anyone honestly believe that a thread about decocking a revolver would run 100+ posts if the author were not a friendly blonde female?

Okay, I guess I'm one to talk...have contributed 2 of the 100 posts so far.
LOL You guys are way funny and cool!!! I do plan to reply to a few of your posts since I was last here. I'm in the process of moving and am busier than a one armed blonde paper hanger. hahaha (Isn't that the way it goes?) I've had a lot of fun reading your posts and the more I read the more important I think it is to know the proper....well...you kmow. LOL

See you soon!!

~ Jazziette

"Praise the Lord and pass me my uncocked pink revolver!!!"

:P

rcmodel
July 14, 2009, 05:52 PM
Does anyone honestly believe that a thread about decocking a revolver would run 100+ posts if the author were not a friendly blonde female?I can't believe it ran 120+ posts even if Paris Hilton, and Marylin Monroe had of started it together!

rc

ACORN
July 14, 2009, 06:15 PM
Who's Marylin Monroe?? Oh wait that's that creepy looking goth-rockstar :neener:

mbt2001
July 14, 2009, 06:21 PM
Odder threads than this have run as long or longer.

shadowsangelita
February 7, 2011, 09:08 PM
So this is in regards to a rather old thread however, I'd still just like to say THANK YOU to the one who posted the thread on how to safely uncock a loaded pistol. I have been around guns and fired a few but by no means did i grow up using them or really learning how to other then for protection. I had a recent scare with an intruder in my house that happened to be a neighbors kid. Needless to say for the first time i loaded and cocked my mothers 38 handgun. When I saw that it was this kid and i knew him i didn't need to shoot thankfully however, i was stuck standing there with a cocked 38 and no idea how to uncock it without just discharging it. But as stated previously by the same poster in my little community inside Houston's city limits i would have had the cops called on me. Then would have had it taken away because i'm not registered to carry it. I searched the internet and this was the first site that popped up. Thanks to your very clear description on the process, i was safely and confidently able to uncock it. I cannot thank you enough for posting something as simple as the more experienced gun handlers would think. As i always learned in any area of expertise its always beneficial to remember the basics every now and then. Thank you again! :)

NMPOPS
February 7, 2011, 09:38 PM
Why would you want to carry one cocked? I don't know where you live in AZ but everywhere I have lived discharging a weapon in the city limits (as lohg as you don'y hit someone) is only a misdemeanor, not a felony.

murf
February 7, 2011, 09:58 PM
condition RED.

murf

Nushif
February 7, 2011, 10:14 PM
I really, really hate to say this.

But I smell a massive troll, too.
First a talk show host, readily showing off the real femality (Yes, now it is a word) via a pic, then a licensed animal rehab type ... shooting hawks in Texas on a ranch ... before living in AZ or wherever...

I've played enough online games to smell a troll fairly well. And even if this isn't a troll in the traditional sense ... this a favour-badger.

joeq
February 7, 2011, 10:34 PM
Why does the person that fired up this thread again sound eerily like the lady that stopped posting in 2009? Not only that but this is their first post? Wasn't she from Texas originally also? :uhoh:

Buck Snort
February 8, 2011, 12:58 AM
HO-CHEE-MAMA!! I just flat out CANNOT BELIEVE this thread racked up 129 posts, and now 130!! Hey guys, go watch some "I Love Lucy" reruns on TV!!

Tomcat47
February 8, 2011, 01:12 AM
Me Either...............131................:uhoh:

But I Read all of Them..........:what:

She Done the Right thing (cops) if she felt uneasy though! :cool:

NavyLCDR
February 8, 2011, 01:28 AM
Then would have had it taken away because i'm not registered to carry it.

Might want to become familiar with even the most basic of Texas firearms law. There is no registration of guns in Texas. There is no permit required to carry a firearm on one's own property in Texas.

132!

788Ham
February 8, 2011, 11:52 PM
She made a statement about, "Not being able to decock it with the "barrel" open." Explain how you open the barrel Jazz!:what:

NavyLCDR
February 9, 2011, 12:12 AM
She made a statement about, "Not being able to decock it with the "barrel" open." Explain how you open the barrel Jazz!

Usually there is a latch that is below the rear sight that you pull back and then the gun breaks open on a hinge below the barrel, in front of the cylinder.

http://www.thelegendbegins.com/schofield2.gif

AuntFrahn
December 8, 2012, 12:01 PM
Hereís the thing. I went target practicing yesterday and removed the snake shot. When done, I put the snake shot back in it.

This morning before heading out for a run, I strapped on the holster and remembered switching to regular bullets and wanted to be sure I had snake shot in. Iím not that good a shot yet and donít want to miss. So, I removed them - yes, they were snake shot.

I have only four of those left which left an empty slot. [Yeah, yeah, I know thatís the wrong term.] So, I could see the empty one when I snapped it back after looking. Hmmmmmm.....do I now have the empty slot positioned to go off first when I cock it? Being the good programmer that I am, I tested. Oops. Dang!!!!! Sure, cocking it does position move it up one where I thought. But, now, I have a live round ready to fire. Dang!!!

The suggestion to place my thumb in between and click it. Well, sounds logical. But, as the first person said, if youíre nervous about it, donít do it.

This is especially frustrating since my neighbor [a former Marine] isnít out and about yet, so I canít ask for his help and worse yet, my target shooting buddy told me about a recent incident with an illegal in her yard with law enforcement tearing after him. Unfortunately, law enforcement deemed it necessary to run THROUGH her house and threaten to taser her HUSBAND who they thought was the bad guy. Uh.....heís huge and the other guy was certainly not so. The illegal was NEVER in her house! So, the illegal gets away. The husband had almost caught up with him but stopped when the law threatened to taser him.

As, you can see, walking/biking/running in what I thought was a safe neighborhood is no longer the case. Actually, I had the gun for packs of dogs! Oh, yeah there was that incident almost two years ago when another neighbor went berserk and started firing his gun with the bullets getting way to close to those in my yard! SWAT team, the whole works.

So, yes, I cocked the gun before thinking it through. Duh!!! Iím looking for my Marine guy on the way out and if heís not there, I guess Iíll just hope no dogs or illegals head my way. I hear javelinas are dangerous, too but I think itís kind of late in the morning for those guys. I suppose I could carry my gun that just shoots blanks and scare them to death.

Done now.
Thanks for listening.

BRE346
December 8, 2012, 12:48 PM
I love this exchange. It made me go check my revolver to learn about the safety with my finger off the trigger. Good call. My gun has such a light SA trigger that I wouldn't dare cock it unless it was aimed at a hostile threat.

BCRider
December 8, 2012, 01:53 PM
AuntFrahn, a few things you can do.

First off practice cocking and decocking with an unloaded gun. Get familiar with it and come up with a resonably foolproof method. Learn how to hold the cylinder as it latches into position so that the empty, if you want to carry with one chamber empty, is under the hammer/firing pin. Next try dry firing the gun with it EMPTY enough to learn and take note of the direction of rotation. Knowing which way the cylinder turns will lead to knowing where to put the bullets and give you a better understanding of how to load it if you want to use a mixed load of shot and hard bullets at some point.

Finally if you feel that you may need to de-cock a loaded revolver at some point it's handy to have a safe target to point it at "just in case" A 5 gallon bucket of sand with a snap lid (an old contractor's bucket o' paint and lid can do nicely) gives you enough stopping power to soak up a bullet if the gun should go off. Often folks will put such a safety spot on the floor. But that means having to point the gun down while de-cocking the hammer. That might put your hands and arms at an awkward angle. If that's the case then this is where the lid comes in handy. You can seal the sand in the bucket with the lid and aim the gun ahead at the lid with your hands level. It's nice if the bucket is also down in the basement with it sitting back against the outside concrete foundation wall. If you're in an apartment up in the air just be sure that the other end of the bucket faces out and away towards as safe a direction as possible/practical. Or put a round layer of 1/4 inch steel in the base of the bucket before you fill it with sand.

There also used to be a product out there called "Aimpad" which is a special ballistic pillow which is used as a bullet stopper just for situations like this. It's about the size of a sheet of paper and about an inch thick. To use it you put the muzzle on the spot in the center of the pad and then manipulate the gun to de-cock the gun. If you slip the pad will stop the bullet.

Vern Humphrey
December 8, 2012, 05:19 PM
The suggestion to place my thumb in between and click it. Well, sounds logical. But, as the first person said, if you’re nervous about it, don’t do it.
The proper way to uncock a revolver is:

1. Point it in a safe direction.

2. Place your right thumb on the hammer and apply pressure, as if cocking the gun. The hammer will move back slightly.

3. While holding the hammer back, apply pressure to the trigger, and slowly let the hammer down, controlling it with your thumb.

1911Tuner
December 8, 2012, 08:16 PM
The proper way to uncock a revolver is:

1. Point it in a safe direction.

2. Place your right thumb on the hammer and apply pressure, as if cocking the gun. The hammer will move back slightly.

3. While holding the hammer back, apply pressure to the trigger, and slowly let the hammer down, controlling it with your thumb.

Bingo...and that applies to lowering the hammer on any weapon. Get control of the hammer first. Pulling the trigger and trying to catch the hammer is a surefire way to set one off.

460Kodiak
December 8, 2012, 10:44 PM
Ya'll behave now. Hear?

LOL!!!!

T Slothrop
December 9, 2012, 12:50 AM
Good lord, y'all: He/She/It is a troll. Please stop feeding it!

Certaindeaf
December 9, 2012, 01:19 AM
.I have only four of those left which left an empty slot. [Yeah, yeah, I know thatís the wrong term.] So, I could see the empty one when I snapped it back after looking. Hmmmmmm.....do I now have the empty slot positioned to go off first when I cock it? Being the good programmer that I am, I tested. Oops. Dang!!!!! Sure, cocking it does position move it up one where I thought. But, now, I have a live round ready to fire. Dang!!!.

When you're monkeying around/trying to figure out how a particular gun works/operates, make sure it's unloaded. Only load it after familiarization/mastery of the basic fundamentals.

1911Tuner
December 9, 2012, 04:45 AM
Good lord, y'all: He/She/It is a troll. Please stop feeding it!

Oh, we know that. Every so often even a troll will ask a question that can be of use and interest to somebody. In this case, possibly a newcomer to handguns who isn't very adept with them...and learning the manual of arms would come in handy.

Incidentally, I don't dry fire unless I'm checking the trigger action...not even when clearing the pistol. It's an old habit that comes partly from my father's admonition to "Never snap the gun" and partly from the oldest story in the book: "Oh my God! I didn't know the gun was loaded!"

I'm such a stickler for controlling the hammer that I do it even when handling pistols with a decocker.

460Kodiak
December 9, 2012, 11:01 AM
Pardon my ignorance, but what is a Troll exactly? I've been hearing that thrown around on the forum lately and I'm not sure of the meaning.

rodregier
December 9, 2012, 11:18 AM
Troll explained:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troll_(Internet)

smalls
December 9, 2012, 11:55 AM
Thus thread came back from the dead twice!

NavyLCDR
December 9, 2012, 12:32 PM
The proper way to uncock a revolver is:

1. Point it in a safe direction.

2. Place your right thumb on the hammer and apply pressure, as if cocking the gun. The hammer will move back slightly.

3. While holding the hammer back, apply pressure to the trigger, and slowly let the hammer down, controlling it with your thumb.

2a. Place index finger of non-firing hand between hammer and firing pin.

4. As the hammer goes forward past the sear, release the trigger, to engage any internal safeties.

5. Continue to gently lower the hammer, removing the "safety" index finger at the same time.

460Kodiak
December 9, 2012, 03:07 PM
Ah.... I see. A trouble maker. Thanks for the link.

Alnamvet68
December 9, 2012, 05:45 PM
I cannot imagine why anyone with any common sense, and of course, experience in the safe handling of firearms, would want to carry a revolver cocked. I know of only two instances where I would cock a hammer...when on the firing range when shooting single action, or at home, with an empty weapon, triple checking there are no rounds in the cylinder, and cocking this empty gun to check its action.

460Kodiak
December 9, 2012, 06:21 PM
I carry all mine cocked with the trigger guards all cut off. I also carry them in sholder holsters specially modified so the muzzle is pointed at my own heart all the time. It's totally safe!!!!! ;)

Yep, carrying a cocked revolver is about the stupidest thing a firearm owner could do. :confused:

TarDevil
December 10, 2012, 10:26 AM
Well, this was a fun read. How I previously missed it over the span of three years is beyond me (typed one handed while the other practices cocking/decocking).

Any bets on the next name when this entity surfaces again?

otasan56
December 10, 2012, 01:48 PM
There is NO WAY that I would carry a cocked revolver. Hammer down, for sure.

tipoc
December 11, 2012, 12:06 AM
For Pete's sake Tuner close this one! Put a stake through it's heart, stuff it's mouth full of garlic, cut the head off and bury it two football fields distant from the rest of the corpse!

Or else it will rise again!

tipoc

1911Tuner
December 11, 2012, 07:32 AM
For Pete's sake Tuner close this one! Put a stake through it's heart, stuff it's mouth full of garlic, cut the head off and bury it two football fields distant from the rest of the corpse!

And with that...

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