Gander Mountain "Bubba" The Smith


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Flame Red
July 9, 2009, 12:40 PM
Was at the range last week and wanted to shoot the old Granade. I had just a few days before taken it completely apart for a thorough cleaning. Only the second time I had done that. Anyway, I had a lot of trouble getting the clips in for some reason and that should have told me that I was in for problems. First round went off and the second round went 'click'. I tried to eject the round but the breach would NOT open. Got some help from some others and there was no way we could open it. I was pretty sure I had a live round in the chamber.

Decided I would deal with it later and put it back in the truck.

On the way home, I had to stop at Gander Mountain for some stuff and I saw the smith was there so I figured I would ask him his advice. I could not believe my ears. He recommended to me that I check to see if there was a live round in the barrel by shining a flash light down the barrel and looking down it!

:what:

Watch out for "Bubba" the smith!

I just about threw up and walked out. I almost felt like saying to him, You wanna do that for me? But decided I did not want "Bubba the Smith" to have his brains blown out by my rifle.

Had a friend help me later carefully disassemble the rifle. He held it towards the berm while I removed the trigger group, removed the stock. I just had to play around with the op-rod and then it opened to reveal a live round with a light hit.

I took it home and looked it over really carefully and could not see anything wrong. Seems to function ok with snap caps. Have to take it out and try it again I suppose.

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starkadder
July 9, 2009, 12:57 PM
I don't know what your problem is, That is how you check for a live round in the chamber.
It is no different than checking the fuel level in your gas tank with a lighted match, that's just the way you do it. :rolleyes: Bubba is as Bubba does, stupid, stupid, stupid, stupid.


This is this! It's not something else, it's this!

ALWAYS REMEMBER OUR MEN AND WOMEN OVER THERE.

candr44
July 9, 2009, 02:12 PM
You should have let the gunsmith check it since he obviously has no brains to blow out.

Maelstrom
July 9, 2009, 02:32 PM
Maybe because he's used that technique before.

BMF500
July 9, 2009, 02:40 PM
Wow, and this guy makes a living working on other people's firearms!! That's scary, which location was this?

poppy
July 9, 2009, 02:58 PM
Ever hear of a mirror? :neener:

tomh1426
July 9, 2009, 03:04 PM
or a cleaning rod!

Geronimo45
July 9, 2009, 03:18 PM
You can't open the breech... and it's a crime against humanity if you look down the barrel to see if there's a live round before working the gun over?
Do you think that flashlight beams can set off a primer? Do you think guns just fire themselves for no reason?

N003k
July 9, 2009, 03:22 PM
When there's been a clear malfunction CONCERNING a live round....I really don't think it's a good idea to look down the barrel...since, ya know, the round may get set off? There's already been ONE malfunction in the action, is it really safe to just assume at that point that there CANT be another?

I personally make it a point to never look down the barrel of a loaded gun, even one that HASN'T malfunctioned...

highorder
July 9, 2009, 03:25 PM
You can't open the breech... and it's a crime against humanity if you look down the barrel to see if there's a live round before working the gun over?


Why even chance it when you can simply slide a cleaning rod down the muzzle?

Work smart, not hard.

Geronimo45
July 9, 2009, 03:30 PM
I really don't think it's a good idea to look down the barrel...since, ya know, the round may get set off?
But how would it get set off? Again, will a flashlight beam set off primer or powder? Is the gunsmith's office heated to a few hundred degrees, where cook-offs could occur?

Rockwell1
July 9, 2009, 03:35 PM
Familiarity breeds contempt

N003k
July 9, 2009, 03:40 PM
Action won't open, what if the hammers been released but caught up on something and didn't strike yet? As we've covered, already been ONE malfunction, what if that moment you look down the barrel you happen to jostle it just right that the hammer is full released and it fires the round? Is it REALLY worth taking the chance of taking a bullet in the head because you want to visually confirm a chamber in the round rather then find another way?

oneounceload
July 9, 2009, 03:42 PM
But how would it get set off? Again, will a flashlight beam set off primer or powder? Is the gunsmith's office heated to a few hundred degrees, where cook-offs could occur?

hmmm, maybe he bumps just enough on the floor while looking at it? Had a friend DIE when that happened - his rifle was sliding off the hood - as he reached for the barrel, the stock hit the ground and off went his head.....and he had been shooting for over 50 years.........

dumb things happen, why chance it? Use a cleaning rod

cuervo
July 9, 2009, 03:45 PM
What's a "Granade?"

If you mean Garand, you may be able to remove the trigger group with a clip loaded (I've never tried it) and that will remove the hammer so the round in the chamber can't go off.

To empty the chamber, find a wooden fence post somewhere. Place the op-rod handle against the back of the post and push forward on the butt of the rifle.

My guess is you put the follower in backwards.

Geronimo45
July 9, 2009, 03:51 PM
So the problem isn't looking down the barrel - the problem is in playing Marine Silent Drill Platoon while looking down the barrel?

maskedman504
July 9, 2009, 04:11 PM
Geronimo45 I don't understand why you are advocating looking down the barrel of a loaded firearm when there are safe ways of doing it.

candr44
July 9, 2009, 04:37 PM
But how would it get set off? Again, will a flashlight beam set off primer or powder? Is the gunsmith's office heated to a few hundred degrees, where cook-offs could occur?

Next time get Geronimo45 to look down the barrel of your loaded gun. Let him discover how it can accidentily get set off. I'm sure everyone else is easily smart enough to find a safer method.

Are you trying to be a troll or do you really look down the barrels of loaded guns? When you are looking down the barrel, keep in mind never point a loaded gun at what you don't want to shoot. Are you the gunsmith Flamered is talking about?

gondorian
July 9, 2009, 04:41 PM
Exactly, what ever happened to ALWAYS keeping the muzzle pointed in a safe direction?

Geronimo45
July 9, 2009, 04:41 PM
Geronimo45 I don't understand why you are advocating looking down the barrel of a loaded firearm when there are safe ways of doing it.
Going back to the earlier question, how would the gun fire, thus causing safety to be in peril? How could I possibly cause the gun to fire by shining a flashlight down the barrel and looking down the barrel? There is no touching of the gun required when looking down a barrel.
Guns do not fire by themselves.

R.W.Dale
July 9, 2009, 04:53 PM
Going back to the earlier question, how would the gun fire, thus causing safety to be in peril? How could I possibly cause the gun to fire by shining a flashlight down the barrel and looking down the barrel? There is no touching of the gun required when looking down a barrel.
Guns do not fire by themselves.

This is so retarded on so many different levels.:rolleyes: Aside from the obvious glaring safety concerns It's not like you can see down 24" of .30cal bbl from one end with a flashlight that by definition must block your view to shine down said bbl. Even with my high end bore light I can't view much more than 2" of the barrel illuminating from the muzzle

mark a cleaning rod and compare that simple that way when the worst happens you just loose a hand instead of your HEAD

and this from a 3k+ poster no less

lbmii
July 9, 2009, 05:04 PM
I think there is a NRA firearm safety rule that goes along the line of:

No looky looky down the barrel of a loaded, malfunctioned, sixty+ year old, mis-assembled, maybe war-time produced, maintained, stored, and tinkered with by the military, used in all probability in two or more wars, high-powered 30.06 rifle.

Yeah I'm pretty sure there is a safety rule on that and rather specifically I bet.

Mmtay?

candr44
July 9, 2009, 05:26 PM
Going back to the earlier question, how would the gun fire, thus causing safety to be in peril?

If you could possibly know every combination of events that could happen or see into the future then that question would be answerable but no one could know the answer to that. That is why I wouldn't look down the barrel of a loaded gun.

Engines aren't suppose to start by themselves either but I have seen it happen without anyone even being near the equipment. Who could have predicted the events that lead to that happening. No one but it happened anyway.

The question isn't how can it get set off by looking down the barrel but why even take a remote risk when there are safer methods. Keep looking down the barrel if you want but I don't think you will convince people there couldn't possibly be any risk involved especially on a gun with an unknown malfunction.

earlthegoat2
July 9, 2009, 05:30 PM
I try to live my life by thinking any potential action through to the point of wondering whether I will end up on the Darwin awards if this doesnt go right.

DammitBoy
July 9, 2009, 05:32 PM
Maybe geronimo or bubba gunsmith could suck on the barrel real hard and pull the live round out of the barrel?

springmom
July 9, 2009, 05:37 PM
There seems to be a mini-convention of potential Darwin award winners here today.... :scrutiny:

Jan

Geronimo45
July 9, 2009, 07:30 PM
Maybe geronimo or bubba gunsmith could suck on the barrel real hard and pull the live round out of the barrel?
Only works in Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid. :p

I'll try to boil this down a bit. The light from a flashlight will not set a gun off. Looking at a gun will not set the gun off. Only random events (flying hammers, for example) can set the gun off.
Is that what you people are saying?

Now, onto cleaning rods. If the malfunction is a stuck firing pin, running a cleaning rod down the barrel could set the round off. Right? Let's say that there's a 1% chance that you'll set the round off with a cleaning rod.

Random events (flying hammers) are not stopped by you using a cleaning rod. We'll say that they represent 4% chance of setting off the round.

So looking down the barrel with a flashlight, you have a 4% chance the gun will go off due to random events. When running a cleaning rod down the barrel, you have a 5% chance the gun will go off due to random events and your cleaning rod. In one case, the gun is pointed at your head. In the other, probably not.

But random events (flying hammers) can move your gun, right? A flying hammer might hit your hand, causing you to drop the gun, setting it off and causing a bullet+ramrod to go into your head, or the head of a buddy. Can you say that these random events will, in 50% of the cases or more, not cause the gun to move just before firing? It's possible that you do set the round off with your cleaning rod (or random event), and it doesn't hit you. There's no guarantee that the round won't hit a 3-year-old who's standing just the right way... thus, to me, the best course of action is the course of action that reduces the chance of the gun firing at all.

gondorian
July 9, 2009, 08:01 PM
I really don't think there should be any three year olds around when a gun that has a live round stuck in it is being disassembled. I think everyone on this forum is just trying to say; why not do something that would be way less dangerous in the event of an accidental discharge when doing it that way is not any harder?

The Lone Haranguer
July 9, 2009, 08:12 PM
Looking down the barrel to check for a live round? :uhoh::eek:

http://timnovate.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/charles_darwin_l1.jpg

"I give this procedure two thumbs up!" :neener:

Pull the bolt or slide back and look in the breech (and remember that a primer indentation does not mean the cartridge has fired or is incapable of firing), or poke a cleaning rod down the barrel and see if it emerges from the other end, all while pointing the muzzle at something you don't care if you blow a hole in. But don't look down the barrel!!

bigalexe
July 9, 2009, 08:19 PM
I dont get what all these people are thinking advocating the guys technique. I had my shotgun misfire or malfuction last night with a live round, the trigger pulled but no click. Ejected the round onto the grass, fired the next and then re-inserted the round and it did fire. Never did LOOKING DOWN THE BARREL seem like an intelligent idea.

Geronimo45
July 9, 2009, 08:20 PM
But don't look down the barrel!!
The bolt is stuck, thus requiring abnormal methods to figure out if it's loaded or no. If the guy could've got things to work the way you mentioned, we wouldn't be having this discussion. :D

why not do something that would be way less dangerous in the event of an accidental discharge when doing it that way is not any harder?
'Cuz it reduces the chances of the AD happening in the first place.

jcwit
July 9, 2009, 08:54 PM
Are you SURE you didn't detect a little scarcasm in his remark?

The Lone Haranguer
July 9, 2009, 08:57 PM
The bolt is stuck, thus requiring abnormal methods to figure out if it's loaded or no.
Well, then, find a way to get the bolt back.

DammitBoy
July 9, 2009, 09:07 PM
Beat your forehead repeatedly against the bolt until it releases.

B yond
July 9, 2009, 09:18 PM
Y'all are funny.

There are 4 rules to safe firearms handling. These rules overlap. You can usually get away with breaking one of them without someon getting hurt. How many rules do you have to dreak to look down the barrel of a loaded and malfunctioning rifle?

Let's find out:
-treat every gun as if it's loaded. BROKEN! You're not supposed to look down the barrel of a loaded gun.
-keep your weapon pointed in a safe direction. BROKEN! Your eyeball is not a safe direction.
-know your target and what is behind it. BROKEN! We know the target is your eyeball but if you're actually doing this we can't be sure there's anything behind it.
-keep your booger hook off the bangswitch. NOT BROKEN! Unless you're not just dumb but also suicidal.

This argument has gone on long enough that I'm beginning to wonder if Geronimo45 might just be egging you guys on. Surely someone with over 3,000 posts on THR is smarter about gun safety than this.

Come to think of it, Gecko45 = Geronimo45???

:what:

The Lone Haranguer
July 9, 2009, 10:31 PM
http://chappellentertainment.com/images/buba_smith_large.jpg

I wondered what happened to him. :neener: Working in a Gander Mountain store is not what I expected.

Mags
July 9, 2009, 10:39 PM
LOL
Bubba Smith Actor/Football player I have one of his cards from the 70s

Larry Ashcraft
July 9, 2009, 11:03 PM
Ever hear of a hangfire?

Many years ago, I was using a 25-06 I built on an antelope hunting trip, where I fired many more rounds than usual (over two boxes). The weather was hot, and I started having hangfires. I had them with reloads and two brands of factory loads. They would take anywhere from two to ten seconds to fire. Very scary.

What a gunsmith later determined caused those hangfires was that the hot weather swelled up the stock and the cocking piece was hanging up on the wood. Just one tiny little spot, but it was enough to cause a hangfire (the rifle is a 1903 Springfield).

Separate story: A few years ago I had my own little dump truck, a 1956 Chevy, to haul roadbase and gravel and such for our place. I brought one load of roadbase (five tons) home one day and spread it on the driveway. When I dropped the bed, it wouldn't come back down.

I walked around and started to try and figure out the problem when I remembered some advice I had been given some time before; NEVER put part of your body between a raised dump bed and the frame, unless you have personally blocked the bed up with something solid. Well, I checked from a distance, and discovered a tree branch had caught the bed and held it up. When I moved the truck, the bed slammed down with a vengeance.

The point of this rambling? When you have no idea what is causing a problem, don't stick your head in the way and try to figure it out.

I have a hard time believing that a long time THR member would advocate looking down the barrel of a loaded weapon, because the percentages favored him not getting his head blown off.

After that much proselytizing, I won't close the thread right now, but let's see if we can come off as a cut above knuckle dragging idiots, by not advocating doing stupid things with dangerous objects (and that comment is aimed at exactly one member).

trex1310
July 9, 2009, 11:09 PM
Anybody ever see a light primer hit cause a jam in a semi-auto pistol? Then 30
minutes later that same round go off and put a large hole in the passenger side
door of a new pickup. Imagine if someone had been looking down the bore!

B yond
July 9, 2009, 11:29 PM
let's see if we can come off as a cut above knuckle dragging idiots, by not advocating doing stupid things with dangerous objects (and that comment is aimed at exactly one member).

Well said Larry.

The Deer Hunter
July 10, 2009, 12:08 AM
Going back to the earlier question, how would the gun fire, thus causing safety to be in peril? How could I possibly cause the gun to fire by shining a flashlight down the barrel and looking down the barrel? There is no touching of the gun required when looking down a barrel.
Guns do not fire by themselves.

Looking down the barrel of a known, loaded gun is one of the dumbest things you can you can do.

I don't care how much you may rely on physics or probability, you're a complete idiot.

Geronimo45
July 10, 2009, 12:12 AM
Ever hear of a hangfire?
Do hangfires usually happen after the ten/fifteen/however many minutes it took the OP to drive from the place he was shooting to Gander Mtn? Is there any case of one happening like that? I've always been told that hangfires resolve themselves (or not) within 2 minutes or less. That may not be the case. Aside from the hangfire (I know of no cases where there have been 10 minute hangfires), how is it possible for the gun to fire with no external forces of any kind brought to bear? That's what I'm getting at. Guns aren't that complicated. You can set one off by applying excessive heat or smashing the primer. That's it. When you're not applying excessive heat and applying no forces whatsoever to it, a body at rest remains a body at rest.

I have a hard time believing that a long time THR member would advocate looking down the barrel of a loaded weapon, because the percentages favored him not getting his head blown off.
Again - I consider looking down the barrel to be less likely to cause the gun to fire than ramrodding it. The 'body at rest' notion. And in the event that it fired anyways, I'd much rather shoot myself by accident than someone else.

I am not arguing that the best way to see if your gun is loaded is to look down the barrel. The best way is to open the action - at the very least, it's much quicker. I'm not arguing you should look down the barrel the instant it clicks instead of banging. In the instance that it's been ten to thirty minutes since the trigger was pulled, and still no bang; that it's bounced around in the car and not gone off; that it was laid on the table and didn't go off; that chances are it won't go off without external forces of a significant kind. Far beyond the forces exerted by a flashlight beam.

I'm looking at this from a strictly mechanical point of view. I'm trying to see how the gun would be able to fire in the case that the OP mentioned. If you want to shut the thread/delete my posts on this thread, no problem. If you want to post cases of thirty-minute hangfires, I'll say point taken and move on. Or sulk off to a bear thread. :D

Nugilum
July 10, 2009, 12:13 AM
Why couldn't you use a mirror to look down the barrel? :scrutiny:

The Deer Hunter
July 10, 2009, 12:17 AM
Ever hear of a hangfire?
Do hangfires usually happen after the ten/fifteen/however many minutes it took the OP to drive from the place he was shooting to Gander Mtn? Is there any case of one happening like that? I've always been told that hangfires resolve themselves (or not) within 2 minutes or less. That may not be the case. Aside from the hangfire (I know of no cases where there have been 10 minute hangfires), how is it possible for the gun to fire with no external forces of any kind brought to bear? That's what I'm getting at. Guns aren't that complicated. You can set one off by applying excessive heat or smashing the primer. That's it. When you're not applying excessive heat and applying no forces whatsoever to it, a body at rest remains a body at rest.
Quote:
I have a hard time believing that a long time THR member would advocate looking down the barrel of a loaded weapon, because the percentages favored him not getting his head blown off.
Again - I consider looking down the barrel to be less likely to cause the gun to fire than ramrodding it. The 'body at rest' notion. And in the event that it fired anyways, I'd much rather shoot myself by accident than someone else.

I am not arguing that the best way to see if your gun is loaded is to look down the barrel. The best way is to open the action - at the very least, it's much quicker. I'm not arguing you should look down the barrel the instant it clicks instead of banging. In the instance that it's been ten to thirty minutes since the trigger was pulled, and still no bang; that it's bounced around in the car and not gone off; that it was laid on the table and didn't go off; that chances are it won't go off without external forces of a significant kind. Far beyond the forces exerted by a flashlight beam.

I'm looking at this from a strictly mechanical point of view. I'm trying to see how the gun would be able to fire in the case that the OP mentioned. If you want to shut the thread/delete my posts on this thread, no problem. If you want to post cases of thirty-minute hangfires, I'll say point taken and move on. Or sulk off to a bear thread.
Geronimo45 is offline Report Post

I suddenly understand.

WinchesterAA
July 10, 2009, 12:23 AM
This reminds me of this story...

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/894627/posts
Teen Blinded When Frog Shot From Potato Gun
Houston Chronicle ^ | 4/16/2003 | AP

Posted on Wednesday, April 16, 2003 1:58:12 PM by Ag88

Teen blinded when frog shot from potato gun Associated Press

DALLAS - A teenager was blinded after being struck in the face with a frog shot from a so-called "potato gun."

Daniel Benjamin Berry, 17, received the injury after he looked down the barrel of the gun's PVC pipe barrel and was hit in the face by the frog.

"He is going to be blind in both eyes," Daniel's mother, Lisa Berry, said.

Potato guns are made of pipe with one end sealed. A potato is wedged into the open end and a flammable liquid put into a sealed chamber is ignited, launching the object.

Denton County Sheriff's Department spokesman Kevin Patton said the accident occurred about 1 a.m. Sunday when Daniel Berry joined a crowed of teenagers watching the gun be fired.

When it misfired, Daniel Berry looked down the barrel to see what was wrong when the gun went off, Patton said.

"He said it just went off. It was a misfire. It hit him square in the face," Lisa Berry said, adding that her son had broken bones in his face that would require surgery.

Patton said no charges would be filed.

"This is the first incident involving a potato gun that we have had to deal with," he said. "What are you going to do? This was an accident."

Lisa Berry said the accident ruined her son's career dreams.

"All he ever wanted to do was be an Air Force pilot," she said. "That isn't going to happen now."

Larry Ashcraft
July 10, 2009, 12:25 AM
Do hangfires usually happen after the ten/fifteen/however many minutes it took the OP to drive from the place he was shooting to Gander Mtn?
I don't know. My own personal experience with hangfires has shown them to be completely unpredictable. In my case though, the muzzle remained downrange, not pointed at my eye.
Again - I consider looking down the barrel to be less likely to cause the gun to fire than ramrodding it.
Again, you are saying that the percentages favor you not getting your head blown off, and you are apparently OK with that. Well, that's OK, for you.

But you seem to be advocating that everybody here should be comfortable taking the same chances you would, E.G. only a 5% chance of blowing my head off if I do this completely avoidable action.

That is irresponsible. How many times do you think you can tempt fate before the odds work against you?

WinchesterAA
July 10, 2009, 12:27 AM
But then again, Larry.. How long would you have to stare down a barrel to make the chambered round go off?

grampster
July 10, 2009, 12:32 AM
Kapow!!

Larry Ashcraft
July 10, 2009, 12:34 AM
How long would you have to stare down a barrel to make the chambered round go off?
Not sure how to answer that.

Staring down the barrel won't make the round go off, but if it does (go off), you are in exactly the wrong place, if you are stupid enough to be looking down the barrel of a loaded high-powered rifle, that has malfunctioned.

Geeze, have we entered the twilight zone? THR members arguing that the four rules are all of a sudden optional?

bigfatdave
July 10, 2009, 12:40 AM
Ever hear of a mirror?Quoted for pure cleverness.
A mirror and a pocket laser would allow you to take a look down a VERY long bore.
I agree about a cleaning rod possibly jiggling something and releasing a hammer/pin/flying-Thor-sized-hammer/etc.

iScream
July 10, 2009, 12:41 AM
Wow, even if you're absolutely correct and there is very little danger under these specific circumstances you just don't look down the barrel of a loaded weapon. I wouldn't dream of doing it even if I was sure there was no round chambered and the safety was on. Thinking about looking down the barrel of a weapon after a malfunction and possible chambered live round honestly makes the hair stand up on the back of my neck. Do you really want some 13 year old kid reading this to think it's OK to look down the barrel of a loaded gun under any circumstances? Whether we like it, or deserve it, or not, having a high post count and being registered on a forum for almost 3 years makes some people consider your statements as more credible. To me, it seems very irresponsible to even remotely suggest it could be OK to point this gun at your face.

-Chris

R.W.Dale
July 10, 2009, 12:55 AM
you cannot see down 24" of .308 hole no matter what methiod you employ so why bother with risking having your brains splattered all over the celing

again you cannot see down a bbl well enough to tell anything. You can only see through them

bikerdoc
July 10, 2009, 01:02 AM
Guns do not fire by themselves.

Right, but The trigger has already been pulled resulting in a hangfire. Yes it will fire by itself, if and when it want to. THERE IS A LIVE ROUND IN THE CHAMBER.

Follow the 4 safety rules.

It is late. Good Night.

2RCO
July 10, 2009, 01:29 AM
No pointing the loaded gun at your head unless you want your ticket punched.

The odds of blowing your head off may be small but why take the chance?

Geno
July 10, 2009, 01:42 AM
I can't believe my eyes in this thread! Geronimo45...you serious or you just messin with our minds?! If the next time I'm at the range I hear them call for "Clean-up on shooting lane 7", I'll know it was you.

Blackbeard
July 10, 2009, 01:49 AM
Let's make this simple.

Chance of being shot in the head while looking down the barrel: Almost zero.

Chance of being shot in the head while not looking down the barrel: zero.

I'll take zero, thank you.

P.S. Playing Russian roulette with only one live round, the odds are you won't blow your head off. I still don't want to play.

Geronimo45
July 10, 2009, 03:09 AM
Chance of being shot in the head while looking down the barrel: Almost zero.

Chance of being shot in the head while not looking down the barrel: zero.
Thank you. Agreed. I believe that was my original thinking on the issue.


I can't believe my eyes in this thread! Geronimo45...you serious or you just messin with our minds?!
A little of both (since I enjoyed this thread, probably the latter). Playing Devil's advocate is a great way to learn the 'why' for positions you believe in but never thought out (people who are ticked off talk a lot). I guess the stay-away-from-the-muzzle bit is simply a basic tenet. Its value is such that it remains in effect even when the chance of danger is slight.

KYShooter
July 10, 2009, 04:52 AM
Who taught you firearm safety, whoever it was they failed miserably, if you treat the gun as if it is loaded then there is no reason to see if it is loaded until you are able to pull the bolt back and check the old fashioned(correct) way.

Sport45
July 10, 2009, 04:54 AM
I tried to eject the round but the breach would NOT open. Got some help from some others and there was no way we could open it. I was pretty sure I had a live round in the chamber.

Decided I would deal with it later and put it back in the truck.



Had a friend help me later carefully disassemble the rifle. He held it towards the berm while I removed the trigger group, removed the stock. I just had to play around with the op-rod and then it opened to reveal a live round with a light hit.

The OP never said he took the gun into Gander Mountain and I'll assume he didn't since it would have been hard to demonstrate it was unloaded at the door. I'll assume he just went back and talked to the 'smith.

There's been a lot of talk about looking down the barrel of the gun in this situation. There's no way I'd try to do that. I wouldn't put a cleaning rod or anything else down the barrel either.

When I read the post I wondered how many people had been swept by the muzzle of that loaded rifle between the time of the misfire and the time they got the round out of the chamber. The hammer may well have been partially cocked the entire time. The light primer strike he reported is pretty much normal for the Garand when chambering a round. It does not indicate the hammer had fallen.

hso
July 10, 2009, 07:39 AM
. Its value is such that it remains in effect even when the chance of danger is slight.

And the consequences are catastrophic.;)

I've been in the safety profession for 20 years. When the potential is low, but the consequences are catastrophic (head blowed off) you rate the risk as high. Sounds like one of those situations.

rogertc1
July 10, 2009, 07:51 AM
Remember the gun will shoot you if you peak down it's barrell. They are kinda sneaky you know.

CajunBass
July 10, 2009, 08:24 AM
Well. At least the heat is off "Bubba" now.

rbernie
July 10, 2009, 09:34 AM
I guess the stay-away-from-the-muzzle bit is simply a basic tenet. Its value is such that it remains in effect even when the chance of danger is slight.
Uh, yes.

When the potential is low, but the consequences are catastrophic (head blowed off) you rate the risk as high.Exactly.

I cannot believe that it took fifty seven posts for this basic notion (aka 'common sense') to become evident to some of y'all.

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