Is there an Ammo Storage Limit?


PDA






Martyk
July 13, 2009, 08:19 AM
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=461917

Reading this thread got me to thinking... is there a limit as to how much ammo you can store/keep/stockpile? :confused:

We all know that as far as the media is concerned, if you have a handgun, rifle, and a shotgun it's an Arsenal ! :eek:

But what about ammo or for that matter components?

If you enjoyed reading about "Is there an Ammo Storage Limit?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
ar10
July 13, 2009, 08:48 AM
I have it all, powder, primers, bullets, and so many loaded round I don't keep count, and a really don't worry about it. If there's a fire and I'm at home I grab a fire extinguisher and call the fire dept. Two houses down from lives one of the cities battalion chief and he's also a shooter. He's been in my house and saw all my reloading stuff and how it's stored. He commented that he was very glad I kept everything in wood cabinets and not in metal.

Martyk
July 13, 2009, 09:26 AM
he was very glad I kept everything in wood cabinets and not in metal.

Why?

bigfatdave
July 13, 2009, 09:28 AM
is there a limit as to how much ammo you can store/keep/stockpile?
Is there a limit on how many books you can own?

scottaschultz
July 13, 2009, 10:30 AM
Is there a limit on how many books you can own?
Have you read Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury?

Scott

oneounceload
July 13, 2009, 11:01 AM
SOME communities MAY have limits placed on flammables - check your local regs

EOD Guy
July 13, 2009, 11:27 AM
he was very glad I kept everything in wood cabinets and not in metal.

Why?

Wood cabinets will burn and vent any gas buildup from the burning powder or ammunition. Unvented metal cabinets could allow the build up of pressures that could cause a detonation and spread of burning material. The heavier and tighter the metal cabinet, the more such an occurance is likely.

ar10
July 13, 2009, 11:34 AM
Wood cabinets will burn and vent any gas buildup from the burning powder or ammunition. Unvented metal cabinets could allow the build up of pressures that could cause a detonation and spread of burning material. The heavier and tighter the metal cabinet, the more such an occurance is likely.

Exactly, bullets will cook off but don't go far. If everything is in a metal cabinet it could easily turn into a bomb. That's one of the reasons they don't sell powder in cans any longer.

Bailey Guns
July 13, 2009, 01:42 PM
Yes, there is a limit. It's called "discretionary income".

CoRoMo
July 13, 2009, 01:44 PM
is there a limit as to how much ammo you can store/keep/stockpile?

The answer is YES.


There is definitely a limit to the weight that your floor joists can structurally bare.
Also, if you have a concrete floor, basement, etc. you are still limited by the cubic-foot volume of the domicile you store the ammo in.

alemonkey
July 13, 2009, 02:00 PM
I know a guy who stacked his ammo cases in the shape of a couch and put a slip cover over the top of it.

oneounceload
July 13, 2009, 02:25 PM
he was very glad I kept everything in wood cabinets and not in metal.
Why?

Then why do they recommend a metal powder magazine for black powder which IS an explosive, unlike gun powder?

WinchesterAA
July 13, 2009, 02:32 PM
oneounceload, that sounds like something you would use in the field (I don't know much about proper black powder unfortunately) and in the field I would not trust a wooden anything to survive all the abuse I go through, and consequently it would also go through.

lebowski
July 13, 2009, 02:32 PM
Exactly, bullets will cook off but don't go far. If everything is in a metal cabinet it could easily turn into a bomb. That's one of the reasons they don't sell powder in cans any longer.



Hmmm ... I never thought this was a problem before, but when I buy bulk ammo from Georgia Arms I generally leave it in the green metal ammo cans. Should I not be doing this?

EOD Guy
July 13, 2009, 03:26 PM
he was very glad I kept everything in wood cabinets and not in metal.
Why?

Then why do they recommend a metal powder magazine for black powder which IS an explosive, unlike gun powder?

Black powder for small arms is considered a low explosive and tends to deflagrate rather than explode. Type 4 magazines are designed to contain up to 50 pounds of low explosives. Black powder packaged for use in small arms (no more than 1 pound per conductive plastic container) can be reclassed as a Division 4.1 Flammable Solid, the same classification as smokeless powder.




Exactly, bullets will cook off but don't go far. If everything is in a metal cabinet it could easily turn into a bomb. That's one of the reasons they don't sell powder in cans any longer.


Hmmm ... I never thought this was a problem before, but when I buy bulk ammo from Georgia Arms I generally leave it in the green metal ammo cans. Should I not be doing this?

You're fine. Small arms cartridges will not ignite as a mass, but will function individually over time. I've seen hundreds of ammo cans that have been involved in fires and the most damage I've seen is bulged containers with several holes that provided self venting and kept the pressures to reasonable levels. A few cans did split open, but none that I saw actually fragmented. The gaskets also tend to melt in a fire, venting the cans.

danprkr
July 13, 2009, 04:22 PM
There is definitely a limit to the weight that your floor joists can structurally bare. Also, if you have a concrete floor, basement, etc. you are still limited by the cubic-foot volume of the domicile you store the ammo in.

Exactly. That's why I'm building a new barn.

CoRoMo
July 13, 2009, 05:01 PM
I'm building a new barn.

Hey me too!!
I erected the walls before I figured out the roof framing, so I've had four walls standing up for a couple weeks now. When done, it will change the wife and I's life as we know it!!

jhco
July 13, 2009, 09:05 PM
No I pretty sure that there is no limit on how much, but check your state regulations.

raskolnikov_22
July 13, 2009, 10:08 PM
I know a guy who stacked his ammo cases in the shape of a couch and put a slip cover over the top of it.

Points for creativity

crazy-mp
July 14, 2009, 12:12 AM
Massachusetts has a limit of 10,000 rounds of rim fire ammunition, 10,000 rounds of center fire, and 5,000 rounds of shotgun ammunition.

But thats Massachusetts, for federal laws only for the primers and powder, I think 10,000 primers and 20 pounds of powder, then you have to have special storage, then you can double it.


Just like the guns, more than I need (at the moment) but not as much as I want (for the future).

chevyforlife21
July 14, 2009, 12:16 AM
idk who cares its not like getting caught with a illegal full auto or something

ThrottleJockey72
July 14, 2009, 12:19 AM
The only limit is that of money and space. The lack of either can be overcome with an abundance of the other.

PTK
July 14, 2009, 12:23 AM
idk who cares its not like getting caught with a illegal full auto or something
We care because we obey the law.

bigfatdave
July 14, 2009, 03:25 AM
Have you read Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury? Of course, but it wasn't suppossed to be an instruction manual! Have you read 1984 by George Orwell? Even more appropriate these days.

larry_minn
July 14, 2009, 04:05 AM
Massachusetts has a limit of 10,000 rounds of rim fire ammunition, 10,000 rounds of center fire, and 5,000 rounds of shotgun ammunition.

But thats Massachusetts, for federal laws only for the primers and powder, I think 10,000 primers and 20 pounds of powder, then you have to have special storage, then you can double it.


Just like the guns, more than I need (at the moment) but not as much as I want (for the future).

I know some folks who should be glad they don't live in Mass.

Just for grins I reload 9mm and .45acp. I ran into a deal on .40 S&W a while back. then the sks, AR,etc. Lets just say if you count any centerfire.. I would be over 10k.

oneounceload
July 14, 2009, 09:27 AM
oneounceload, that sounds like something you would use in the field (I don't know much about proper black powder unfortunately) and in the field I would not trust a wooden anything to survive all the abuse I go through, and consequently it would also go through.


Actually that metal "powder magazine" was in Cabela's catalog - not for field use, but home storage. Personally, my powder is stored in a closet in a cardboard box......

chuckusaret
July 14, 2009, 12:52 PM
I had my small ammo supply, 30 or so 50 cal surplus ammo boxes , inspected by my town's fire inspector. The storage was adequate and his only comment was, "you must have an understanding wife"

Carl N. Brown
July 14, 2009, 01:07 PM
I had about 6 ounces of an unknown ball rifle powder I decided to dispose of by burning off outdoors. I put it on paper towel over a bed of wet charcoal ashes and lit the corner of the paper. It burned off with a near-silent orange flame. I recall years ago burning off some trash that accidentally included a paint can: THAT was an earth shattering KaBoom worthy of Marvin the Martian. I suspect in case of a house fire, our household cleaners, alcohol based disinfectants, hairspray, spray paint, bug spray, furniture polish, etc. will be a bigger concern than our "arsenals".

larry_minn
July 14, 2009, 01:38 PM
I had my small ammo supply, 30 or so 50 cal surplus ammo boxes , inspected by my town's fire inspector. The storage was adequate and his only comment was, "you must have an understanding wife"

Serious? Is it a business? I about told off the insurance agent who wanted to inspect my house.
Instead I asked questions. He finally said all he NEEDED to see was the furnace/fuse pannel, water heater. But normally he would "TOUR" peoples homes......
Now we have a new agent (the other retired) I am sure he will show up one day. :(

LRaccuracy
July 16, 2009, 11:07 AM
You know when the Media gets their hands on a story where the police confiscates guns and ammunition they always distort the facts. Can you imagine if the police confiscated 10,000 rounds of ammunition from a household of an innocent person. For that matter anyone. That would be worth 6 months of news coverage.

Actually I don't know anyone that I shoot with that does not have a healthy supply of ammunition. Whatever healthy is.

TheProf
July 16, 2009, 04:44 PM
Is it safe to keep a stockpile of ammo in a metal safe?

AirForceShooter
July 16, 2009, 05:00 PM
Chuck:Why would a Fire Inspector be looking at your stash?

TheProf
July 16, 2009, 11:47 PM
Is there ammo limit in what a person can keep in his gun safe? Would that create an unsafe situation in case of fire? (Assuming that ammo is kept in military metal boxes and the boxes kept inside a safe.......multiple metal boxes that is.)

chuckusaret
July 17, 2009, 11:38 PM
Serious? Is it a business? I about told off the insurance agent who wanted to inspect my house.
Instead I asked questions. He finally said all he NEEDED to see was the furnace/fuse pannel, water heater. But normally he would "TOUR" peoples homes......
Now we have a new agent (the other retired) I am sure he will show up one day.

Hey, I needed the fire inspection and a inspection of my roof , hot water heater and breaker panel to renew my insurance. A 5 minute job that cost me $150.

If you enjoyed reading about "Is there an Ammo Storage Limit?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!