Food on 10 day hunt


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jim in Anchorage
July 19, 2009, 08:09 AM
Weight no object[no coolers though] I hate MREs[although the self heaters can be nice for lunch] I just wondered if some of you had favorites.

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Ty7940
July 19, 2009, 08:11 AM
Bologna, Lots and Lots of bologna. It wont spoil if cold, and can fill you up quite quickly. I also boil ramen noodles if camping, and last but not least, PICKLED SAUSAGES!

wankerjake
July 19, 2009, 08:11 AM
Poppyseed bread and apple pie are staples at hunting camp for us...God I can't wait for elk season! Oh, and Copenhagen!

Marlin 45 carbine
July 19, 2009, 08:40 AM
grits and freeze-dried canned butter is a good hot breakfast with canned sausage gravy and dried eggs.
hormel is putting out several different packaged meals that don't need refrigeration, fairly good stuff. about 2$$ for a supposedly 2-serving package but a hungry fella can easy polish one off.
summer sausage and hard salami are good with crackers.
make sure you carry potatoes along even dried to have if you take a deer for camp meat. canned milk does fine to make mashed 'tater's with.
canned sausage is good with pancakes from instant mix for breakfast with reconstituted scrambled dried eggs. 'beverly' brand is about the best with hormel close. sliced fried 'spam' is good with fried 'taters and onions. of course large cans of chili and beef stew, chicken dumplings, spaghetti and such are classic fare.
there is instant biscuit mix available now if you're hauling a d.o. along.
there are dried veggies available from some camping supply outlets in bulk, green beans, tomatos and such, even sweet potatoes. most salt pork will keep awhile w/o refidgeration and is good to simmer dried veggies with a slice of.
since you are in Ak bologna would keep for awhile in that cool climate.
as said canned apple pie filling will make a good cobbler useing the biscuit mix for 'crust' in a d.o.
haul the stuffs required for a fish fry - onions and taters also. watch out for bears though because they can smell a fish fry from miles away if downwind of it. or actually about anything fried draws 'em. I have no experience w/grizz but blacks come a'running to a fish fry around here. big rascals too.
try to talk the best cook in your group to do the cooking even if that is his/her only camp chore - you won't regret it.

jim in Anchorage
July 19, 2009, 09:00 AM
Great responses guys, been doing this hunt for 15 years but knew I would get some new ideas here.
blacks come a'running to a fish fry around here. big rascals too

He goes into the pot. 3 a year, season year round.

BENELLIMONTE
July 19, 2009, 09:26 AM
Most of my hunting is backpacking in and setting up camp. Therefore I have to consider weight; Potato flakes (dehydrated), ramen noodles, dehydrated soup mixes can all be found at Winco, Wallyworld or Costco. Oh yeah I forgot to mention take a sound suppressed .22 cal pistol (Tactical Solutions) for camp meat i.e grouse, ptarmigan & bunnys.

MCgunner
July 19, 2009, 09:47 AM
I used to carry Dinty Moore and Wolf Brand and such on extended hunts. Gave me motivation to shoot something for camp meat. :D It ain't bad, but you get tired of it fast. On my extended west Texas or New Mexico hunts, I normally got a rabbit pretty quick, one or two every day, occasionally scaled quail, until I finally shot a deer. I carried a revolver for the rabbits. I hardly ever went out to that lease in west Texas when I didn't get a deer, nice ones out there, too, mulies AND whitetail if you went during the mulie season. That was a great lease, a day's drive, but a great lease.

At times, I'd spend lunch time shaving "nopalitos" and cutting them up for supper. Lots of prickly pear out there.

mokin
July 19, 2009, 10:00 AM
Camp food, one of my favorite subjects.... But I'll make this short. Recently I've been eating a lot of Lipton rice/noodle "side" dishes mixed with a package of tuna or salmon "Creations" or a chicken equivalent. It's not great but not bad for backpacking food. It's generally fast, lightweight, and doesn't require much fuel to prepare or refridgeration. Have fun out there and remember the words of some great camp cook "If all else fails, get'em drunk and feed them in the dark."

Lou McGopher
July 29, 2009, 02:55 PM
Nightcrawlers.....

For the rod and reel, of course!

351 WINCHESTER
July 29, 2009, 03:02 PM
Peanutbutter.

rcmodel
July 29, 2009, 03:59 PM
Salt & Pepper, a few onions, taters, and some biscuit mix.

I plan to have fresh meat in the coolers after the first day. :D

rc

jim in Anchorage
July 30, 2009, 08:27 AM
Bump.keep it up,good stuff. geting close!

Supertac45
July 30, 2009, 06:28 PM
Go check out the freeze dried meals at a decent backpacking store, or look at www.mountainhouse.com. Great taste. While hunting plan on double servings per person to fill up and have enough that you won't be hungry. I've been using them for years and reccommend them to everyone.

emerson
July 30, 2009, 06:57 PM
Not necessarily in the same meal: oatmeal, onions, apples, beans, peanut butter, honey, bread, rice, nuts, bananas. I do not prefer pasta, but I would shy away from too much sodium in the packaged meals.

dagger dog
August 1, 2009, 07:43 AM
BACON, BACON, BACON, just like that dog on the the TV commercials. It is smoked and salted so it won't spoil for a good while, besides being good to eat you can use the grease for cooking and flavoring other things. A couple pound slabs, and a roll of tin foil, divide the roll of tin foil in two, wrap each slab in the original plastic packaging and in 1/2 of the roll of tin foil. this saves space.

When you get ready to cook use the tinfoil to cook in. If you pack a few spuds,put a slice of bacon into a foil pouch of diced pommes de'terra, and toss 'em into the campfire coals. Tear open the pouch and eat 'em outta the tinfoil. ( pack out your trash!)

If your lucky enough to spear, arrow, shoot, hook, some flesh, cut a portion of flesh, into the foil with a srtip of that nice greasy bacon, on each side, and throw that into the fire with the spuds. You can hear it sizzle in the tin foil wrap, it'll fry right there in the pack.

Try it you'll like it!

federalfarmer
August 10, 2009, 01:23 AM
This is my verison of trail mix!!

chocolate covered coffee beans - cashews - peanut M&M's! :D

Are you ready to take over the world Pinky? Narf! Yes Brain!

Nematocyst
August 10, 2009, 01:52 AM
Most of my hunting is backpacking in and setting up camp. Therefore I have to consider weight; Potato flakes (dehydrated)...I'm also a backpacker.

Years ago, after getting thoroughly disgusted with freezed dried cardboard :barf:, I found a book called The Well-Fed Backpacker (http://www.amazon.com/Well-Fed-Backpacker-June-Fleming/dp/0394738047).

Highly recommended. Teaches you how to make your own light weight, but good, hearty backpack food.

My favorite, especially at the end of a long day of switchbacks or when it's pouring rain: Cheesy Baco Spuds.

Package at home the following into a baggie (can't remember exact proportions, but its hard to go wrong):

* potato flakes/buds
* milk powder (1/3 as much as potatoes)
* parmesian or other dry cheese
* bacon bits (just a couple of shakes)
* butter buds (or in cool weather, use real butter)
* salt, pepper

In camp, add boiling water, stir, eat.

Awesome.

Add a can of sardines and some cookies, all is good.

Can eat it for multiple days.

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
August 10, 2009, 01:11 PM
Since you said weight is not an issue, don't forget tuna-mac. Best camp food (or home food) ever. Get the premium mac & cheese with the melted cheese pouch (but the 'generic premium' is fine). Add a can of tuna fish and some onions (a few jalapenos works too); maybe also add a can of green beans or sweet peas - delicious complete meal. If you put in a can of vegetables, then adding a bit of extra cheddar cheese helps.

Smoked turkey meat for sandwiches also makes an excellent substitute for tuna in this dish.

HB
August 10, 2009, 01:20 PM
Um, Moon Pies. You're set if you eat about one of those :D

Fat Pat210
August 10, 2009, 01:24 PM
Beef jerky,lots and lots of beef jerky.

JImbothefiveth
August 10, 2009, 01:32 PM
If you aren't backpacking you can probably carry a bit more weight, If you're returning to a camp you can just leave it there. If you're alone peanut butter might actually be a choking risk. (I know it's not likely, but if you choke 20 miles away from the nearest person, it could be bad)

jim in Anchorage
August 10, 2009, 03:52 PM
Great ideas guys, I never thought of most of this stuff. No-weight is not a issue, it gets flown in and left in base camp. Actually reading this made me hungry-maybe except for the moon pies:confused:

deanadell
August 10, 2009, 04:07 PM
Pioneer Poridge from Nora Mill Granary.....best hunt camp breakfast there is as far as I'm concerned.........

http://www.noramill.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=31&products_id=264

Dr. Tad Hussein Winslow
August 10, 2009, 04:12 PM
BACON, BACON, BACON, just like that dog on the the TV commercials.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaK9bjLy3v4

CoRoMo
August 10, 2009, 06:24 PM
Weight is always the primary issue on my hunts now as I pack on foot into the back-country. Back when we hunted from a cabin, campsite, or out of the camper-trailer, the sky was the limit and we brought and ate anything & everything we'd like. Steak, salads, lasagna, wine, beer, everything. I just didn't like getting up so much earlier and hiking for hours each morning, just to get to the same place where I wake up from now.

I take noodle dinners, oatmeal, etc. since they are light and just need boiled water added. Ramen, macaroni, etc.

jim in Anchorage
August 10, 2009, 07:21 PM
Weight is always the primary issue on my hunts now as I pack on foot into the back-country. Back when we hunted from a cabin, campsite, or out of the camper-trailer, the sky was the limit and we brought and ate anything & everything we'd like. Steak, salads, lasagna, wine, beer, everything. I just didn't like getting up so much earlier and hiking for hours each morning, just to get to the same place where I wake up from now.

I take noodle dinners, oatmeal, etc. since they are light and just need boiled water added. Ramen, macaroni, etc.
Good for a sheep hunt, but remember camp is my pick up point,and any moose I shoot has to go there.

Polar Express
August 11, 2009, 01:37 AM
Here's one idea: Take a pork loin, slice it about 3/8" thick. Marinade it in Yoshidas with a little bit of lite beer. Something like 5:1 of sauce:beer ratio, or so. Then, throw it on a trager smoker, and smoke it till it's done. When it's done, pack 2-3 slices in a small ziplock baggie, and freeze it. Take a baggie or two with you in your backback when you go out on your daily hunt, and you have a tasty, high-protein snack. Its a lot cheaper than store bought jerky, and you can certainly vary the marinade to your taste, as one prefers. Being fully cooked, it will keep longer than raw meat, and if you can keep it frozen or close to it before heading out each day, it'll keep for a long time.

I do most of the cooking for my fire station. We have a crew of 10 on duty at all times, and on average, we eat much larger portions than cooking for my in-laws. :) it's kinda like cooking for 15-20, and one dare not 'lay short' (not make enough) My guys like biscuits and gravy, dutch babies, bacon, eggs, pancakes, the standard hearty breakfast stuff.

Most of my meals are best done with a full kitchen. I'm trying to rack my brain and think if any of them can be modified to cook with camp-style equipment, let alone with backpack stuff. I'm no wolfgang puck, but I take feeding my guys seriously, and I'm more than willing to share some of my ideas, if you think they would work in your camp cooking plans. Send me a PM if you want specifics.

Homemade granola can be great, and is pretty easy to make, and makes a nice snack.

Some of the canned stuff that is easy, one-pan kinda stuff can be nice. Corned beef hash, Nalley Turkey Chili, even that sun-luc chicken chow mein (the two can pack) can be done in one pan. But, they tend to be high in sodium, and msg.

Just make sure you bring a little supplemental fiber and wet-wipes to keep things moving and clean! :)

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