Night vision good for hunting?


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lobo9er
July 23, 2009, 01:00 PM
Looking at night vision any of them any good? Or is anything affordable garbage?

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j-easy
July 23, 2009, 06:19 PM
well until someone with some knowledge comes along I found this stuff about it.

http://www.optics4birding.com/night-vision-generations.aspx

http://www.atncorp.com/hownightvisionworks

Jorg Nysgerrig
July 23, 2009, 06:53 PM
You might want to check your local regulations regarding the use of night vision while hunting before you go much further.

While there are certainly good night vision devices to be had, they typically aren't cheap.

lobo9er
July 23, 2009, 09:18 PM
what are the good ones everything seems to get bad reviews whats the good stuff???????????

Ballistic Mule
July 23, 2009, 10:12 PM
I've tried to use some my brother has while hog hunting in oklahoma, There gen 2 and I could'nt see the sights on a handgun let alone a long gun. now i'm working on a hot new set up. NV goggles and a Nc star green laser mounted to the side of my A K thats in a ATI folding stock. I've taken hogs w/ the rifle/laser set up at dusk before, But w/ N V!Can't wait to try. Should be a sweet yote rig as well.

ZombiesAhead
July 25, 2009, 07:35 PM
With enough money you can get very nice night vision equipment. Heck, you can even pick up thermal systems if you have $xx,xxx. Cool idea if not particularly sporting, IMO.

rcmodel
July 26, 2009, 12:12 PM
Gen I and Gen II are practically worthless.

Gen III are useful, but prices start at several grand.

BTW: It is illegal to use them, or spotlights for hunting game animals in a lot of states.

rc

highorder
July 26, 2009, 04:55 PM
I got together with a friend who works in the State Dept over the weekend.

He had an AN/PVS-14 for me to examine, and boy, is that a nice piece of hardware.

I had no problem ID'ing human targets at 150 yards with full starlight.

They are available for around $4k.

Ballistic Mule
July 26, 2009, 08:06 PM
If you're on thousands of acres in southern Oklahoma cattle country, hunting the lowly, much despised,feral pig,you can use just about what ever you want. Hell, the D.O.C. gives 00 buck to ranching landowners

If you ever get a chance to hunt'em at dusk w/ that lazer. JUMP ON IT! That thing not only produces an eaisly seen green dot 500+ yds, it projects a pencil thin green line to said dot. Totaly worth the $89.00 I paid for it, makes me wonder what those high dollar ones look like? You just carry at the ready,heads up and point the beam.

All in all the most fun hunt of the many many in my lifetime


Until the night vision next year....Here piggy piggy!!!!!

Sunray
July 26, 2009, 10:10 PM
Make sure hunting at night is legal first. You'll likely find NV devices aren't legal anyway. They don't give clear vision either.

Ballistic Mule
July 26, 2009, 10:23 PM
Like I said out on a 3000 acre cattle ranch in sothern O.K. you can hunt'em however you want. It's the wild west man. It's what they all do, dogs,lights,. when you use dogs,they don't take firearms,you gotta grab'em.No thanks! Ilike to hear it!

The gun goes BANG.....The pig says SQUEEEELL!

LJH
July 26, 2009, 11:37 PM
Gen I, or II will work just fine when used with an IR illuminator or a full moon. You do however have a limited range of around 100 yards.
I have used the ATN 350 (Gen I) for varmint control out to about 60 yards. I am pleased with how well it works.

skoro
July 31, 2009, 08:29 PM
There's a BIG difference in the "generations".

Gen I will work only with an IR illuminator. What you'll see will be about what you could see with a cheap flashlight.

Gen II will let you see w/o an IR light for some distance and to quite a distance with the IR on. It's a BIG step up from Gen I and similar to what our guys used in Desert Storm a few years back.

Gen III is currently about the best available, for all intents and purposes. These will let you see clearly w/o IR light for quite a distance except under the darkest conditions, like a rainy night in the woods. In those conditions, an IR illuminator REALLY lights things up. A Gen III is comparable to what we're using in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Gen I stuff is cheap - in the $100 - $200 range.

Gen II is pricey - probably over $1000 these days.

Gen II is high dollar gear - $2000 and up.

I currently have a Gen II and a Gen III, but I got both of them used over five years ago, and the prices were MUCH lower at that time. I've had Gen I in the past. The Gen I is better than nothing, but not by much. To really be able to see in the dark, you need at least Gen II. 1st Gen is almost always disappointing. You expect to be able to see more. They're very limited in what they'll do. 2nd Gen gear is pretty impressive until you've looked through 3rd Gen optics. Looking through a 3rd Gen device will spoil you for anything else.

Just thought I'd toss that out, because you guys will be looking for something to sell (like your sons and daughters) to get a Gen III in your hands. It's that good. :cool:

And I should add that my NV gear is monoculars, not rifle scopes. I'm into astronomy and that's what got me interested in these expensive toys. I can't comment on how well the current crop of NV scopes works. I'd expect they work pretty darn well, though.

This is my Gen II unit -

http://www.nikon.com/about/news/2000/img/nsearch_i.jpg

And my Gen III -

http://www.imaging1.com/images/1_NVP25_Gen3_night_Vision_monocular.gif

lobo9er
August 23, 2009, 12:10 PM
checking out some gen 3 stuff

skoro
August 26, 2009, 09:37 PM
Gen 3 is the way to go if you can afford it. It'll give you true see-in-the-dark capability.

lynxpilot
October 22, 2009, 07:40 PM
I have a Gen III rifle scope. As with any NVD (except thermal imaging), it's light dependent. On a moon and starlit night, I can ID targets at more than 500 yds. I've ordered a variable spot/flood IR attachment that will likely take the range of the scope beyond the useful range of the rifle. It doesn't do any good with zero light, nor does it see through fog or heavy precipitation, but if you understand its limitations it is nothing less than amazing.

Laws though, are another thing. I'm going to protect livestock no matter what, but they are cracking down on anything at all that even remotely looks military. In MO, it's ambiguous. I've got a hunting brochure released by the Department of Conservation that says hunting fur-bearing animals with NVD's is OK on my own land, but state code does not say that. I called the conservation folks and they said OK on my land, but you can't rely on a phone call and somebody on the other end who doesn't know what the heck they're talking about. I've written my state rep to reword the law.

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