Would you eat "more often" at a restaurant that was openly Pro-gun?


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zombienerd
July 24, 2009, 02:54 AM
This is obviously the wrong group to ask to get a good cross-section focus group result, but, here goes anyway.

Say a small cafe/diner opened a few doors down from your local firing range. The name was "Centerfire Cafe". The food is better than average, there were guns hanging on the walls, the cook and the waitresses were open carrying. There is a sign on the door welcoming all lawful carriers of firearms. Paid members of the local range got a discount, and the range employees ate for free.

Would you eat out more than normal just to visit this type of establishment?


This is all purely hypothetical, but I'm wondering if this "niche" business idea would be profitable.

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N003k
July 24, 2009, 02:59 AM
Eh, as long as the food's good, I definitly would go there more often then other places that are anti-gun or gun-neutral...

Definitly wouldn't eat out more often though.

scottaschultz
July 24, 2009, 03:06 AM
I don't know about this hypothetical restaurant, but I know where I will not eat because of their views on firearms and it has nothing to do with whether or not you can carry in their establishment.

There is a chain of "upscale" bakery/cafes called Panera Bread. Normally I would go in there and get a cup of coffee and a bagel or pastry and leave. On one particular day, I had time to sit down inside while waiting on a friend. So I got out my iPod Touch that has wi-fi built in. I was able to read my email, check the local weather and so on, but when I went to check into a firearm forum, it said I was blocked by their firewall!

I wrote a tersely worded email to their corporate office and asked what gives? Their response: "As part of offering free wi-fi in our bakery-cafes nationwide, it is important that we maintain the community tone and standards that Panera Bread is known for."

They have definitely lost one customer because of this policy and if any of my fellow THR members have a Panera Bread in their neighborhood, you will put them on your "Do Not Patronize" list!

Scott

kyo
July 24, 2009, 03:09 AM
i would go there when i eat out to show appreciation, probably would open carry and talk guns and make it a hang out with me and my friends. I would love one of those.

conw
July 24, 2009, 03:11 AM
YES.

if any of my fellow THR members have a Panera Bread in their neighborhood, you will put them on your "Do Not Patronize" list!


A little bossy are we? :evil:

jackdanson
July 24, 2009, 03:13 AM
I would def. like it, but I think it would turn more people away than it would bring in. Any business I owned would be completely politically neutral on every subject. Of course I would allow concealed or open carry (if it was legal where my theoretical restauraunt is)

ArfinGreebly
July 24, 2009, 03:18 AM
All else being equal -- and the food being good -- sure, I'd eat there in preference to other places.

Let's say, for example, that this restaurant was a "themed" eatery. Think Applebees or TGI Friday's or Outback for themed outfits.

So, a firearms theme. Maybe a "guns of WW I & II" room, a "guns of the Old West" room, a "hunter's history" room, and maybe a "famous shooters" room.

A tastefully themed restaurant of this kind -- provided THE FOOD IS TOP DRAWER -- would have my custom.

I don't get to eat out a lot, but I would happily send my hard-earned bucks to a restaurant like this.

You would, naturally, have to have occasional promotional events like "Cowboy Arms" day, where folks are encouraged to wear their "Wild West" rigs, or ":Open Carry" day. Heck, you might have a "Law Enforcement Appreciation" day.

Make no mistake, owing and managing a restaurant at all is tough enough in its own right. Getting creative with a theme would introduce its own special set of challenges.

But you could count on having my dollar.

Oh, you were planning to open this place in North Idaho, right?

:D

Diamondback6
July 24, 2009, 04:08 AM
ScottASchultz, that's almost verbatim what you posted in http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=464311 , already rebutted with a link to the prior discussion at http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=374123&highlight=panera+bread , which also includes my own Panera experience. Did you not see the reply, or are you just locked on "Talking Point"?

I wonder what I'll find if I Google some of your exact phrases...

RDCL
July 24, 2009, 04:10 AM
I prefer to eat at home:D

Russ

scottaschultz
July 24, 2009, 04:22 AM
ScottASchultz, that's almost verbatim what you posted in http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=464311 , already rebutted with a link to the prior discussion at http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=374123&highlight=panera+bread , which also includes my own Panera experience.Geez, someone needs to switch to decaf!

I did say in the "Perkins" thread that I had posted the same thing in another thread... which happens to be this one! If it was against the rules to post something that someone similar to what someone else had said on another thread or ask a question that had already been answered numerous times, 90% of the content on this forum would go away.

Did you not see the reply, or are you just locked on "Talking Point"?

I wonder what I'll find if I Google some of your exact phrases...
I am so very very sorry that I did not search to see if someone else had posted something about Panera Bread. I don't have any "Talking Points" about this issue at all. I was just relating my experience on the subject.

I am sure every one of your 618 posts are totally unique.

If you want to waste your time Googling my phrases, that is entirely up to you. I have more important things to do!

Scott

Hush
July 24, 2009, 04:32 AM
Do they serve booze? :)

Oro
July 24, 2009, 04:33 AM
I mostly try to eat at home. The food is better - I'm a hell of a chef.

Do I even care about their gun policy? Frack' that noise. Have you ever heard of Maslow's hierarchy of needs? I mean, when you are hungry, you are hungry. You set political crap like concealed carry aside and eat. Is this confusing in some way?

FMFDevildoc
July 24, 2009, 04:33 AM
If the silver ware consisted of MK19 grenade launcher hulls converted into spoons to eat habanero chile spiced up with OC spray I would do it.

Just tried to think of something uber-manly.

Perhaps a menu of MRE's tray items?

I would totally eat there; frequency who knows - although it is likely if prices were right I would do so.

piratelooking@40
July 24, 2009, 04:39 AM
There's a bar here in Vegas which for a while (maybe still) gave away a pistol to people who won enough in a given period (yes, there are gambling machines in the bars here, and yes, you may carry while in a bar, and

EVEN WHILE DRINKING :what::what::what::what::what::what:

as long as you're under the legal BAC limit).

Seen interviews with the owner, he's decidedly pro-gun.

Never been there.

Voted "yes" in the poll, so I'm a hypocrite.

COMPNOR
July 24, 2009, 04:43 AM
I don't think it would change my habits at all. Life is too short to worry about the politics of where I shop, especially "Mom and Pop" type places.

You say the food is better than average, so cost and location will be factors. Besides, if I ate there all the time, I'd get sick. So I'd change it up. Variety is the spice of life.

PTK
July 24, 2009, 04:53 AM
I do just that. A local sushi place LOVES when I open carry in there - the owner comes out, shakes my hand, and always has a kind word to say ("You make us all safer" is a good example)

When I do eat out, which isn't often, it's usually there.

zombienerd
July 24, 2009, 08:54 AM
^^ That's pretty cool. I am thinking about starting to OC around where I live in NH, maybe I'll find a nice little place like that.

I have always wanted to start my own business, and I've been saving for a while to do just that, but I still haven't quite decided what I want to do or sell. I've run my own business in the past (On site computer repair) and I did pretty well. There's just so many things I love to do, it would be nice to combine a few into a business (Cooking + Guns) etc.

flor1
July 24, 2009, 09:05 AM
Interesting you don't like Panera because the they filter certain types of web sites. I have to wonder what your thoughts would be if the next time you went their with your wife or children someone was looking at a porn site in plain view. Careful what you wish for. What you and I may deem as a normal site very well bother others.

1-UP
July 24, 2009, 09:24 AM
It's an interesting idea, but I'm somewhat skeptical about how well it would do. It would take a special kind of community to support something like that to the point of thriving.

Look at it this way - the biggest worry you have in the business is the quality of your food, not your politics. If you start limiting your customer base (and there are PLENTY of folks who would avoid it because of the guns), you're putting yourself at a disadvantage.

If you serve alcohol, that creates an interesting problem. The people you're trying to attract won't be able to purchase your product.

Would the "Open Gun" thing be enough to draw folks in (More than you scare away)? Maybe, but usually when my family decides what to eat it's based on what sounds good. Same when I'm with a group of friends. We don't pick Finley's because of the "Awesome stuff on the wall".

Having a gun theme/decorum might be a good idea/possibility. I've seen restaurants with such things before, although never the overriding theme. They add some class to the place.

What would it be like to cook/waitress with a pistol on your side? Seems like you'd be knocking into a lot of stuff and it'd be in the way a lot. Maybe I'm just a big lummox though. Kitchen probably wouldn't be very good for the finish, seems like a tough environment.

zombienerd
July 24, 2009, 09:38 AM
I wasn't thinking of a full service bar/restaurant, more of a little side of the road, few booths and a long "bar" type Diner. There wouldn't be any alcohol, but just lots of "short order" food. Breakfast served all day, steaks, burgers, sandwiches, maybe some baked dishes. Throw a pizza oven in there, and you're a "one stop shop" for anything tasty.

The thing was it's proximity to the firing range. I figured maybe make a deal with the range that I give discounts to their members, their employees eat free during work, and My employees and I would get free range time, something like that.

I'd open a firing range/restaurant myself, but I don't think that the health board would feel to kindly about all that lead in the restaurant :P

bnkrazy
July 24, 2009, 09:51 AM
Considering I created the Friend or Foe site for this purpose, I can say I can and do eat at pro-gun establishments when I go out.

Since starting the site, I've come to realize there are enough pro gun eateries around that I don't miss any of the places I used to patronize that maintain their anti-self defense policy.

As for your idea zombienerd, I think that it's great, and wish you luck if you pursue it.

Deanimator
July 24, 2009, 09:52 AM
Here in Ohio, I can't carry into any restaurant that serves alcohol. People are working to fix that. That's state law, so I can't blame the restaurant. I disarm before entering those establishments.

I don't know of any non-liquor serving restaurants in my town that are posted. If I did, I'd avoid them for the many others that aren't.

Blackbeard
July 24, 2009, 09:57 AM
I know it may sound strange, but I don't base my buying decisions on the political views of the seller. My principal concern is whether they are selling what I want, and secondarily what is the value compared to the price. I do eat at Panera and will continue to do so, because they have a low-fat low-calorie menu that is just wonderful. If I want to browse THR there I either get on the 3G network with my iPhone, or wait until I go home.

If the "Centerfire Cafe" opened near me, I'd go and try it out. If the food was unappealing, unhealthy or overpriced, I wouldn't return.

BBQLS1
July 24, 2009, 10:28 AM
It would register as a plus to me, but I don't know about the sum total of the pluses. I'd try it out for sure.

middy
July 24, 2009, 10:46 AM
Nah. I go for the food.

Doggy Daddy
July 24, 2009, 10:54 AM
There's a bar here in Vegas which for a while (maybe still) gave away a pistol to people who won enough in a given period

There's also a Mexican restaurant on Craig Road near Pecos that has a bunch of old C&R items hanging on the walls. Excellent food. I usually see quite a few cops and Air Force people in there too. So, yeah, I had to vote "yes" in the poll.

DD

chuckusaret
July 24, 2009, 11:02 AM
I believe every business owner has the right to empose any rules that he/she so desires within their business, of course these rules must not be in violation of any city, county, state or federal laws. It is also your right to not to shop in his/her business if you do not agree with their rules..

I never enter any store that has a "No Guns" sign of any type posted, this includes gun stores. The majority of the gun stores here in Palm Beach County Florida have signs that say "No Guns" or "No Loaded Guns" and I don't enter their business for any reason. I take my business to shops that don't have No Gun signs posted even though their prices are a bit higher.

NavyLCDR
July 24, 2009, 11:03 AM
Yes.

Dino's in Seattle and Island Cafe in Oak Harbor.

searcher451
July 24, 2009, 11:24 AM
I don't frequent businesses that mount "No Guns Allowed" signs on their walls, but I wouldn't eat at a restaurant that welcomed guns and served bad food, either. If the food was consistently good and the service accommodating, then sure. But you'd have to have all three in harmony to get my business consistently.

Mikee Loxxer
July 24, 2009, 11:30 AM
I like the idea of being able to carry while eating. That being said one should wash their hands after handling firearms and ammunition due to the presence of lead. Having the cook and waitstaff handling these things does not give me piece of mind as I like to reduce my exposure to lead. Clean food only please.

This poll should give the option of choosing not to eat there.

Deanimator
July 24, 2009, 11:48 AM
I know it may sound strange, but I don't base my buying decisions on the political views of the seller.
If two businesses are roughly comparable and one despises me and one doesn't, I'll go with the one that DOESN'T despise me.

deadin
July 24, 2009, 12:51 PM
As said by others, a lot would depend on the quality and price of the food.
Another consideration would be the type of customers it attracted. If it were full of the knuckle-dragging "I've got a gun, so you'd better watch out for me 'cause I'm Bad" types (I think you know what i mean;)) I probably would avoid it.

scottaschultz
July 24, 2009, 01:06 PM
flor1 wrote: Interesting you don't like Panera because the they filter certain types of web sites.

Blackbeard wrote: I know it may sound strange, but I don't base my buying decisions on the political views of the seller.

But when a business posts a sign that says NO GUNS ALLOWED, everyone hollers and screams and gets their panties in a wad because this is a violation of their Constitution Right to Bear Arms! Before there was a 2nd Amendment there was a 1st Amendment! So explain to me why it is so wrong to ban firearms from a business, but when it comes to the Freedom of Speech, I should just have to suck it up and get over it!

I do have a choice when I shop and like Deanimator said: If two businesses are roughly comparable and one despises me and one doesn't, I'll go with the one that DOESN'T despise me.

Scott

texas bulldog
July 24, 2009, 01:26 PM
a word of advice...

it's hard enough to open a successful restaurant charging everyone regular price. if you give free lunches to range employees and discounts to range members, and you're located right next to the range, i don't give you long before you're closing your doors. the vast majority of new business ventures fail, and restaurants are probably even harder to succeed at than other businesses. be careful where discounts are concerned. it's easy to give something. but it isn't so easy to take it away once everyone is used to it and you realize it's killing your margin.

of course, my advice is worth exactly what you paid for it.

good luck.

kingpin008
July 24, 2009, 02:32 PM
it's hard enough to open a successful restaurant charging everyone regular price. if you give free lunches to range employees and discounts to range members, and you're located right next to the range, i don't give you long before you're closing your doors. the vast majority of new business ventures fail, and restaurants are probably even harder to succeed at than other businesses. be careful where discounts are concerned. it's easy to give something. but it isn't so easy to take it away once everyone is used to it and you realize it's killing your margin.

This.

Unless you're dealing with pretty high-end cuisine, the actual profit margin on your food isn't going to be all that impressive. Once you start handing out free meals and discounts to customers every single day, you're going to go bankrupt faster than you can say "what happened?"

I mean, it's a great idea - I'm in culinary school right now, and plan to open my own bakery at some point down the road. When I do, I fully intend on offering discounts to CCW holders and LEO/military. But when you start talking about free meals to range employees while on the clock, and discounts to all range members and whatnot, you simply start throwing money out the window.

If anything, offer a flat ten or twenty percent discount for range employees and/or members, and maybe offer specials on a rotating basis - a free one-topping pizza for the shooter with the best score during bullseye or IDPA league nights, for instance. That way, you're not locked into a situation where you're giving away food left and right, but people still stay interested in what you've got to offer.

KarenTOC
July 24, 2009, 02:53 PM
1. if it gave discounts to members of the nearby range, I would probably eat there -- if I were going to eat out after going to the range (I generally don't eat out after going to the range).

2. if the food and price are good, I'd add the restaurant to my list of places I like to go, but it wouldn't be the only place I'd go, and it wouldn't cause me to increase my number of restaurant meals.

3. I hate chain "theme" restaurants, so if you got too successful, you'd lose me as a customer.

Deckard
July 24, 2009, 03:31 PM
A chef's political views don't affect the taste of his food.

ArfinGreebly
July 24, 2009, 03:40 PM
I notice some fretting above regarding people being frustrated by the policies instituted by business on their publicly accessible, privately owned networks.

I have a subscription to GoToMyPc on at least one of my home computers, and VNC server running on all of them.

It's a piece of cake to set it up.

When I go somewhere that wants to interfere with my browsing, for whatever reason, I just go around them.

I log into one of my home boxes and surf from there.

It's not quite as fast, but it gets the job done and I don't stew in the frustration of it all.

I have only been in one place ever where ALL my avenues to THR were blocked. For those occasions, I have a cell network card for my laptop. I get basically ISDN speeds on it. Using that, nobody's network setup blocks me.

I get to THR. Always. If I'm blocked, I find a way.

351 WINCHESTER
July 24, 2009, 03:43 PM
When we go out to eat I care more about the food, the atmosphere, the service and the price. I've got my pistol anyway so who cares?

inSight-NEO
July 24, 2009, 03:54 PM
I may feel more inclined to eat at such an establishment (vs. others) in order to show my support for the owners belief in certain rights, for being around those with interests similar to mine and in hopes that my repeat business would help to keep such a place around for a very long time.

If the food/atmosphere is great, so much the better. If not, well...I can always stop by for a cup of coffee at least.

Now, the wife may not feel so inclined to eat at such a place all the time. So, variety would still be of certain necessity when it comes to dining out.

putteral
July 24, 2009, 04:59 PM
I agree with 351 WINCHESTER!

oak1971
July 24, 2009, 05:21 PM
Assuming they had good food and reasonable prices, I would rather spend my $ there.

zoom6zoom
July 24, 2009, 06:52 PM
I have to eat out a lot when I'm on the road, so I don't go often when I'm near home. But when I do, it's often to an Open Carry event.

Scott, Panera is a favorite stop for me when I need to grab a quick breakfast on the road. I open carry in them all the time and have never gotten a negative remark. I think that says more than their generic firewall configuration.

Erik M
July 24, 2009, 06:55 PM
i would go there when i eat out to show appreciation, probably would open carry and talk guns and make it a hang out with me and my friends. I would love one of those.
My thoughts exactly. Depending on the social atmosphere of your local community this could be a wonderful idea.

scottaschultz
July 24, 2009, 07:08 PM
OK, well maybe I am being a bit harsh about Panera. As many have pointed out, their food really is pretty good and the one near my house has a drive through! I was just a little surprised especially since I was able to access the previously denied forearm forum from another free wifi hotspot.

Scott

COMPNOR
July 24, 2009, 08:49 PM
OK, well maybe I am being a bit harsh about Panera. As many have pointed out, their food really is pretty good and the one near my house has a drive through! I was just a little surprised especially since I was able to access the previously denied forearm forum from another free wifi hotspot.


You simply overreacted. Instead of trying to see what was up, you jumped to the wrong conclusion. Perhaps next time you'll take the time to see what is really up before jumping to boycott.

stevelyn
July 24, 2009, 11:28 PM
Not only would I eat there, I'd be trying to hook up with one of those gun totin' waitresses as well. :D

sohcgt2
July 24, 2009, 11:43 PM
When choosing a restaurant I am not concerned with the political agenda of the owner. When choosing a congressional representative I am unconcerned with their culinary abilities.

2RCO
July 24, 2009, 11:56 PM
When choosing a restaurant I am not concerned with the political agenda of the owner. When choosing a congressional representative I am unconcerned with their culinary abilities.

If the Restaraunt owner is an anti and keeps it to himself I'll still eat there because I won't know. If said owner actively campaigns against my Rights and makes it clear in his establishment then I go elsewhere. Usually the best way to stay in business is to be politically neutral.

ar10
July 25, 2009, 12:07 AM
No. I'll eat where ever the mood suits me, and my wife. If they don't want guns in their place, I lock it up. If they do, I don't but at the same time I don't advertise one way or the other. The way I see it they have just as much right to refuse guns as I have for carrying one but I won't and never have stopped going to someplace we want to eat at. I don't hold it against them, it's their property.

Ben Shepherd
July 25, 2009, 12:30 AM
The place I eat Sunday breakfast at has signs advertising CCW classes. Does that count as pro-gun?:D

DoubleTapDrew
July 25, 2009, 12:38 AM
If the food was good AND it was a pro-gun place I'd absolutely eat there. You'd have to start looking into profit margins and overhead costs before considering the discounts though. Given the place you describe I'd be happy paying a few bucks more to eat there. Especially considering such a controversial theme would undoubtedly turn away some portion of the customer base, I'd want to help keep it going for standing up for us (pro gun crowd).
I have to wonder if when the subject of insurance for the place was explored would the theme cause premiums to get ugly. It wouldn't be any more "dangerous" and would probably be safer than other establishments, but unless you find an insurance provider with a similar theme they might try to ream you on rates.
Also on the subject of web filters on wi-fi usually "weapon related" sites are blocked by default. It's not necessarily the company trying to stick-it to gun owners, it can be the company not wanting to pay the IT guy to go through every blocked site and decide if they want to allow it or not. Or the company not wanting to get sued when somebody looks up how to make (insert illegal device here) at your establishment. I'm not defending any company, they may be anti-gun but just letting you know that's something that isn't uncommon and categories cover a broad spectrum of sites. It's usually a CYA move, not a political statement.

wvshooter
July 25, 2009, 12:42 AM
For me it's all about the food. We'll, price and service matter too, but let's get back to the food.

countertop
July 25, 2009, 12:57 AM
I eat out a lot.

The only thing I am interested in is good food. If its good and interesting, Id eat there. If it isn't, I wouldn't.

Now, if it was local to me, someplace I could grab a quick breakfast or something, then yes, I might frequent it more (provided the food was good). But simply placing it near a gun range, first I'd probably never make the connection, and then I'd assume it was gimmicky (it is) and being so overt in its views Id probably avoid it simply because the owner was focusing too much on marketing rather than on quality.

scottaschultz
July 25, 2009, 02:21 AM
You simply overreacted. Instead of trying to see what was up, you jumped to the wrong conclusion. Perhaps next time you'll take the time to see what is really up before jumping to boycott.Actually I jumped to the right conclusion. I based my decision to boycott them (albeit temporarily) only after I got their response that the firewall had blocked the site. To be honest, I thought there was some setting on my side that was causing the problem. I didn't assume it was intentionally blocked until I was able to log on from a different location.

Besides, its not like I am going to spend any length of time surfing the web on a 2" x 3" screen!

Scott

chris in va
July 25, 2009, 02:26 AM
I'll eat where the food is good...period. KY doesn't have a restaurant carry prohibition save for the bar area, so it doesn't affect me.

Walkalong
July 25, 2009, 09:48 AM
Yes I would.

buck460XVR
July 25, 2009, 12:41 PM
Say a small cafe/diner opened a few doors down from your local firing range. The name was "Centerfire Cafe". The food is better than average, there were guns hanging on the walls, the cook and the waitresses were open carrying. There is a sign on the door welcoming all lawful carriers of firearms. Paid members of the local range got a discount, and the range employees ate for free.

Because of the better than average food and the discounts given would be the reason I would eat there....the rest of it is just theme and decoration.

Detritus
July 25, 2009, 06:36 PM
if all other things are equal, food and service are good, THEN i might be inclined to favor such a resturant. it's convenience to the range would also factor in.

where i am now, OC is banned outright, and most of the resturants fall into two categories, don't care if your carrying concealed, or are required to post their premises by law (ie bar and grill types).

if this were NOT a hypethetical i'd say be careful about the discount/free meal aspects, those can tank your viabiliy if over done and drive off some of your base if cut back later to correct the issue. Oh and for an under served piece of customer health, make sure the bathroom is stocked with a soap/wipes that efficently removes lead residue from hands, a factor most don't readily think of.

Double Naught Spy
July 25, 2009, 07:28 PM
I might be more willing to give it a try than some other business, but the bottom line is that I am not going back unless I really like the food.

I currently don't eat any place where I feel the environment is unsafe, so a pro-gun eatery isn't going to change my eating regime simply because it is pro-gun.

crebralfix
July 25, 2009, 08:08 PM
YES!

Reston, VA has a Champp's...it's OPENLY progun. The manager told me they train together and it will be pro-gun and pro-open carry as long as he works there.

aka108
July 25, 2009, 08:24 PM
Really would if they donated 5% of the gross take to to the NRA or other pro 2nd Amendment organization.

AirplaneDoc
July 25, 2009, 08:30 PM
I generally go to a place for the food more than the atmosphere. I eat in some pretty crappy looking places that have great food items (read something like Walleye sandwich on Friday, or fried chicken dinner etc.)

The overall idea sounds good, Why not open a restraunt at the range. two of the trap/skeet clubs here serve food, and seem to do a pretty good food/beverage business.

As for staff open carrying The department of health might not go along with your plans either

dullh
July 25, 2009, 10:08 PM
Where I eat out it's ALWAYS pro-carry - in my own house! I go out to eat probably 5 times a year. My biggest concern is not whether or not they allow CCW - it's that the food usually sucks compared to home, the grease those places use disagrees with me, and it's money better spent at the grocery store - for better food I can make at home! Plus at my house I know nobody on the staff has hepatitis! (I live near Asheville, which has at least 3 hepatitis outbreaks in restaurants every year!)

Hk91-762mm
July 25, 2009, 10:41 PM
I KNOW AND EAT AT THIS MAGICAL PLACE YOU SPEAK OF:)
Its in NY State- cataragus cty near Little Vally ..Every time I do the gun show at little vally I have to get the guys togeather and go to the horseshoe inn. There are more guns hanging on the walls than at a gun show - Mounted game heads and gun related posters abound . This place is GREAT! Steak to pizza dress from Nice to snowmobile outfit....

HammerG26
July 26, 2009, 05:17 PM
Here in Georgia we publish those businesses which are pro-gun on GPDO... it is a great way for us here in Georgia to patronize those businesses which support 2nd Amendment.

mljdeckard
July 26, 2009, 05:51 PM
I will absolutely avoid restaurants that have ANTI-gun policies, and tell their managers why. In my state, their rules hold no force of law, but I will tell them anyway.

larry_minn
July 27, 2009, 01:27 AM
Well lets say I don't go to "Famous Dave's". When MN got the "shell issue" they put up "NO GUNS" signs. Never mind there are half a dozen guns/ammo mounted on walls. (ok they are screwed into wall/behind plexi/or something)
I e-mailed them and they said "to keep customers safe" type reply. I have not been back since. (Used to go at least once a month) Not that anyone ever knew I carried...

Isher
July 27, 2009, 01:40 AM
Growing up in the American West, in the fifties, as

I did. Didn't need to have a gun "theme".

People carried pistols, rifles, shotguns.

Leaned 'em up against the table while eating breakfast.

My, how times have changed.



isher

denfoote
July 27, 2009, 03:40 PM
Fools who restrict access by armed patrons are begging to get robbed or hit by a crazy!!

ar10
July 27, 2009, 04:39 PM
Fools who restrict access by armed patrons are begging to get robbed or hit by a crazy!!

I disagree, the chances of getting robbed, whether restricted or allowed is 50/50. You said it yourself "hit by a crazy".

Hammerhead6814
July 27, 2009, 08:43 PM
I eat where the food is good. Whether or not they allow guns, I could care less. I do not go to a restaurant to defend myself same as I don't go to a swimming pool to run laps.

HoosierQ
July 28, 2009, 11:02 AM
I didn't read the whole thread but "what is a pro-gun restaurant" and why would I care? Pro vs Anti -gun politicians are of concern to me. Restaurants, car washes, pharmacies, not so much. I wouldn't even know which was which anyway...unless the place was owned by Mayor Bloomberg or something.

JohnL2
July 28, 2009, 11:11 AM
Do they have free refills?

Joe Demko
July 28, 2009, 11:45 AM
Probably not. I don't go out to a restaurant to have my political beliefs validated. Cleanliness, quality of food, quality of service, quiet atmosphere, and price are things I consider when choosing a place to eat. I don't care how pro-gun you are if your staff is surly, your place is dirty and/or loud, your food isn't to my taste, or your prices are out of line.
If I want to eat while wearing a gun and looking at a bunch more, I can do that at home. You'll need more than guns to make me want to go to your place.

bonza
July 28, 2009, 09:24 PM
I think you'd find it would end up like most other gun-related businesses.....full of deadbeat know-it-alls who have nothing better to do than hang around all day offering unsolicited advise & generally interfering with the paying customers! "What you gonna do with that BLT, what you should be getting is a Ruben.....now that's a sandwich! When I was in Special Ops. (read Catering Corps) we made a killer Pastrami on Rye."

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