Kids Thread for Safety


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Yo Mama
August 11, 2009, 10:33 PM
I was discussing CCW with a friend, and had the most interesting tactic to keep kids safe with firearms.

They tell their kids, "If you find a gun, and tell Mommy or Daddy, you get 100 bucks!"

The kids look actively for guns, and won't touch them as it negates the deal.

Thoughts? I thought it was hillarious, but effective.

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ThrottleJockey72
August 11, 2009, 10:37 PM
Doesn't sound quite right to me. Can't put my finger on it, but it just doesn't sound right. I teach my children about guns, shoot with them, provide them with their VERY OWN gun, etc, etc.... This IMO eliminates their curiosity and teaches them the right way to behave. Got it, just realized why that doesn't sound right. It is a cop out, an excuse for not taking an active role in parenting.....

cchris
August 11, 2009, 10:52 PM
Hm, that's interesting. But the deal doesn't mention anything about not touching the gun. I think kids would be more likely to grab it and bring it to their parents. Add in that little clause, and it's an interesting tactic.

The only real tactic to keep kids safe from guns in the house is to keep them locked away. A locking box on your nightstand, with the key being kept with you, seems to be the safest way to do this.

TimRB
August 11, 2009, 10:56 PM
I dunno. When I was a kid (uh...some time ago) there was a public service campaign telling kids to leave blasting caps alone if they found them at a construction site, mine, or quarry. As a result, I scoured every construction site I came across, and never did find one of the things. Go figure.

Tim

General Geoff
August 11, 2009, 11:06 PM
The only real tactic to keep kids safe from guns in the house is to keep them locked away. A locking box on your nightstand, with the key being kept with you, seems to be the safest way to do this.

No such thing as a childproof safe, lock, or gun. There IS such a thing as a gunproof child, though. It requires dedication and education by loving parents. This way, when (not if, but when) your child happens across a gun, they'll know what to do (not play with it, and tell you or another trusted adult nearby).

DoubleTapDrew
August 11, 2009, 11:21 PM
Gunproof child is the best way. When I was young and saw a gun I always thought "cooooool!" but touching one without dad supervising was not a consideration. I hope to do the same if/when i have kids. Take away the mystery and educate. They aren't forbidden talismans of mystery, but they are serious pieces of hardware that require an adult to oversee and answer questions.

Fred Fuller
August 12, 2009, 06:59 AM
http://www.corneredcat.com/TOC.aspx#Kids

-from a mom who shoots...

lpl

(Proof? OK...)

Kids and Gun Safety

Childproof ... Isn't

(Or, the things 5 little boys taught me)


By Kathy Jackson



If you dump an entire container of bubblebath into the upstairs sink, a little at a time, while running the water full blast, bubbles will come out of every other drain in the house.

Sword-fighting with vacuum cleaner parts almost always results in broken windows.

So does playing baseball.



If you tell your kids to play baseball only on the 'safe' side of the house, they'll manage to break a window anyway.


Always, always, always empty their pockets before you put their clothes into the wash.

Better yet, have them do it.

Frogs do not like washing machines.

Or dryers.

When a 3 year old wants to know how long a roll of toilet paper is, he will lean as far out of the upstairs window as he can to unroll it.

The neighbors will call if they see a small child apparently about to fall out of an upstairs window.

Twice.

Did I mention childproof locks aren't?



There is no such thing as a child old enough to know better.


Dialing 9-1-1 and then hanging up almost always results in a visit from Officer Friendly.

Dialing 9-1-1, yelling, "Help! Help! Everyone hates me!" and then hanging up results in a visit from Officer Unfriendly.

Scissors should never be allowed in the same house as 4 year olds.

If you use the scissors to cut the cord to the radio while the radio is plugged in, it makes a really cool, loud popping noise.

And it melts a hole right through the metal part of the scissors, too.


Childproof locks ... aren't.
Childproof gates ... aren't.
Childproof ... isn't.
If your big brother has a twenty-gallon aquarium in his upstairs bedroom, you can take the end of the tubing out of the tank and watch the water pump out onto the floor.

Nineteen and three-quarters gallons is a lot of water.



Fish can look worried.

(Who knew...?)


Aquarium water that has soaked through the upstairs floor onto the ceiling below looks remarkably like someone peed on the ceiling.

If you report to your mom that someone peed on the downstairs ceiling, she probably won't panic immediately. This is because she doesn't believe you.

A carpet that has had nineteen and three-quarters gallons of aquarium water spilled on it never smells quite the same afterward.

Dishwasher soap isn't good for you and doesn't taste good, but toddlers like it anyway.

The people at the Poison Control Center are really nice.

Tums aren't poisonous, but it's not a good idea to eat the whole bottle at once.

The people at the Poison Control Center are really nice.

Philodendron leaves aren't really good for you and don't taste good, but toddlers will eat them anyway.

The people at the Poison Control Center are really nice.

Nobody in his right mind would eat a handful of ladybugs.

A two-year-old boy cannot be said to be in his right mind.



If you call the Poison Control Center often enough, the nice lady will remember you.


You can get your four-year-old brother to try to take his bike over the bicycle ramp you just built if you talk fast enough. He really wants to, anyway.

A bright red goose egg on your little brother's elbow looks remarkably like a broken arm.

If you stand in the middle of the garden and throw dirt clods up in the air as hard as you can so that when they come down you can break them with your head, eventually you will get one with a rock in it.

Head wounds bleed.

A lot.

It is a miracle that any male child lives to adulthood.





In view of all the above, I have very strong opinions about kids and gun safety. If you do, too, I encourage you to read the following articles.

Next Steps
Childproof Locks?
Safe Storage Around Children
The First Lesson
Disarming Kids' Curiosity
Is Your Child Ready for the Range?
The First Trip to the Range
Why a Mom Should Take Her Kids Shooting
Having Fun With New Shooters by LawDog
Talking to Older Kids About Firearms
The Way It Used To Be
Shotguns and Rifles for Children and Petite Adults

Old Fuff
August 12, 2009, 08:42 AM
I don't know how many parents have told me, "Our kids can't get to our guns because they are all under lock and key..."

When this answer comes up I ask them, "So you keep them at home 100% of the time?" and "Ever hear of peer pressure?"

Securing guns when kids are around makes obvious sense, but gunproofing kids makes even more. Never think that home is the only place that they or they're friends might come across a firearm. :uhoh:

Yo Mama
August 13, 2009, 10:13 AM
Thanks for all the advice. I loved the link Lee, thanks.

I also worry about outside of my home. In my home I am in total control, where as I was at my sisters the other day with my kid running around, and sisters idiot boyfriend had a rifle by the bed in a room that she was playing in. She knew not to touch it, as we watch Eddie Eagle with her. I was very proud of her, and yelled at Brother in Law, you know we are coming, put everything away.

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