Mountain men?


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ed dixon
January 19, 2003, 02:13 AM
Any recommendations for reading about these 19th-century trappers/adventurers? Non-fiction in particular, but if you've read a good novel I'd be interested. Thanks.

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Hkmp5sd
January 19, 2003, 07:16 AM
Mountain Man by Vardis Fisher. It's fiction, but very close to fact. The movie Jeremiah Johnson was based on it.

4v50 Gary
January 19, 2003, 11:13 AM
Give Your Heart to the Hawks.

Iggy
January 19, 2003, 11:37 AM
Carry the wind by Terry Johnson is a real good one..

Gets into the nitty-gritty of trappin and livin' in the shining mountains..


Keep yur powder dry and what yur backtrail...:)

Iggy
January 19, 2003, 11:40 AM
Author of Give your heart is Winfred Blevins.. and interesting dude to talk to..

Carry the wind by Terry Johnson is a real good one..

Gets into the nitty-gritty of trappin and livin' in the shining mountains.this is part of a trilogy on the mountainman.. Border Lords and another one.. can't think of the name...


Keep yur powder dry and what yur backtrail...:)

redneck2
January 20, 2003, 07:19 PM
If you're into real Hawkens (no, not the cheap quasi-replicas)

Hawken Rifle, Mountain Man's Choice by John Baird

Firearms, Traps, and Tools of the Mountain Man...can't remember the author

BigG
January 21, 2003, 11:05 AM
"Crow Killer" according to my research was the book that spawned Jeremiah Johnson. Haven't read it. "Son of the Morning Star" is supposed to be a great read on life on the frontier, about Crazy Horse and Custer. Also haven't read it. You can see I'm behind in my reading! HTH

Hkmp5sd
January 21, 2003, 12:18 PM
"Crow Killer" according to my research was the book that spawned Jeremiah Johnson.

The copy of Mountain Man that I have has Robert Redford's picture on the cover and claims to be the basis for Jeremiah Johnson. One of the firsts stories in it is the crazy woman that has her family killed. In the book, she actually kills 4 braves with an axe and runs the others off.

BigG
January 21, 2003, 03:48 PM
I did a little search and here is the Amazon blurb from "Crow Killer." Crow Killer (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0253203120/002-9976036-5137630#product-details)

Apparently there are a number of sources for the Johnson story as told by Redford's film. Heck, they can't even agree on his name, John/Jeremiah, Johnson/Johnston.

Crow Killer and The Mountain Man is listed in the credits at imdb.com.

Here is my take on the Redford film. George's Review of Jeremiah Johnson (http://www.epinions.com/content_42996829828)

Shameless personal plug. :neener:

Hkmp5sd
January 22, 2003, 03:27 AM
You do know you are forcing me to by a copy of Crow Killer, don't you? It will drive me nuts until I read it and see the difference between the two books and the movie.:)

BigG
January 22, 2003, 10:12 AM
I haven't read Crow Killer myself, HK. Just thought I'd seen it listed in the credits the several times I've watched the movie.

BTW, have you see The Mountain Men?

Super good movie about foofuraw and stuff!

George's Review of The Mountain Men (http://www.epinions.com/content_56609705604)

Dave Markowitz
January 30, 2003, 09:17 PM
Firearms, Traps, and Tools of the Mountain Man...can't remember the author

The author was Carl P. Russell.

Navy joe
January 30, 2003, 11:08 PM
Jones Mountain Trails by Tom Floyd of the Appalachian Trail Club. Details the history of a locality near me from pretty much the King's land grants up to when they were kicked to the flatlands in the '30s to make a National Park. Several great bios on individual residents that made their livings entirely on the hill.

4v50 Gary
January 31, 2003, 10:27 AM
Journal of a Trapper by Osborne Russell

scotjute
January 31, 2003, 01:53 PM
Do a search for "Library of Fur Trade", that should give you the site for the "Library of Fur Trade Historical Source Documents".
This has about 20-30 letters, diaries, and complete books on the mountain men. I've down-loaded several. My favorite so far is on a book by Victor "The River of the West : Joe Meek's Adventures/Years in the West" or something very similar to it. My favorite incident is the time the grizzly came into the camp of two trappers, one with a Hawken (2 triggers), and the other with another gun (one trigger). They grabbed each other's gun by mistake and the excitement begins.

Iggy
January 31, 2003, 10:36 PM
.

sixgun_symphony
February 2, 2003, 01:36 AM
I recommend that you get a subscription to Muzzleloader magazine. (http://www.muzzleloadermag.com/) .

BTW, You gotta read about Hugh Glass! http://www.muzzleloadermag.com/images/muzzleman2.gif

ed dixon
February 6, 2003, 01:04 AM
Thanks, guys. I appreciate the info. Sixgun, I've read Muzzleloading sporadically, but you're right a subscription might be a good idea. Back to give Amazon some more of my money.:D

jmbg29
February 6, 2003, 03:53 AM
From http://hometown.aol.com/Gibson0817/fur.htm

It is not known what Hugh Glass before he appeared in the Rocky Mountains as a fur trader. He was thought to be a seafarer, possibly even a pirate who came west. He was known for his wilderness skills. In 1823, he joined the Major Andrew Henry expedition to the upper Missouri. He was scouting with some others when he came between a female grizzly bear and her two cubs. He was severely injured, slashed from head to foot. He was bleeding profusely. It was not a matter of if he would die but when. The other members of his party carried him on a litter for several days waiting for him to die, but he still held on. Now came a decision. They were going through dangerous Indian country. They couldn't jeopardize the entire party for one man. So two men would stay behind with him, young Jim Bridger, and a man named John Fitzgerald. Finally after a week it looked like he had died, showing no signs of life. So Bridger and Fitzgerald packed up to go, taking Glass's gun and gear.

But somehow he came out of his coma, so weak he could only crawl. His back was infected from the bear wounds. He rolled over onto a rotting log and let the maggots eat the infection out of his back. Then he started dragging himself toward Fort Kiowa, a trading almost 200 miles away. He lived on the meat of dead animals and rattlesnakes. He slowly gained his strength so that he could walk upright. Most on his mind was getting revenge on the two men who had left him. At one point he was almost run over in a buffalo stampede.

He narrowly avoided being seen by Indians. After somewhere between two and three months he reached the fort. At the fort other mountain men were amazed at his story. He nursed himself back to health. He became obsessed with finding the two men who deserted him on the trail. He discovered that Fitzgerald was working for the military as a scout. He was told he would be hunted down and killed if he killed a soldier. He caught up with Jim Bridger, but had not realized he was just a boy and inexperienced. He forgave Jim Bridger. In 1833, Glass was killed in an Indian attack near present day Billings, Montana.

BigG
February 6, 2003, 05:25 AM
That would be a great idea for a movie! Wow! :cool:

sixgun_symphony
February 6, 2003, 11:47 AM
Man in the Wilderness (1971) (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/6302751144/qid=1044549731/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_1/102-5245378-4705706?v=glance&s=video&n=507846)

They made a fictional movie based on the Hugh Glass story called man in the wilderness.


http://images.amazon.com/images/P/6302751144.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Uncle Ethan
February 9, 2003, 08:54 PM
Another good read [non-fiction] is Johnny Christmas.

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