Modifying Select-Fire to Fully-Automatic


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Kaynbred
August 27, 2009, 09:40 PM
In Connecticut, fully automatic firearms are legal to own but selective fire is prohibited. I vaguely recall reading ~1 year ago about a company which alters them to fire exclusively automatically (or something in that vein), but I do not know how that process works. For example, with whom would I correspond to modify a Title II M2 Carbine that is currently in another state to fire fully automatically before it is sent to Connecticut?

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TexasRifleman
August 27, 2009, 09:42 PM
In Connecticut, fully automatic firearms are legal to own but selective fire is prohibited

You know, there are lots of insane gun laws but that one has to be somewhere at the top of the list :)

PTK
August 27, 2009, 09:47 PM
Various gunsmiths can remove the semi-automatic selection from a variety of firearms. A fellow I know had to have the disconnector on his STEN ground down to be legal in CT. Ironic that it was made in CT a few years back, eh?

In any case, I'll ask around. I don't know off the top of my head who would do that to an M2 in a relatively short (less than 6 months) amount of time.

General Geoff
August 27, 2009, 09:49 PM
That is so backwards.. I'm having a hard time wrapping my mind around it...

N003k
August 27, 2009, 09:52 PM
Its not an intentional bit...more of a loophole...appearently they forgot that full automatic only isn't select fire...and just put select fire in the laws.....

We do have some pretty messed up ones though...

SteveCase
August 27, 2009, 10:29 PM
Now are they legal provided you have the correct permit, say a class III (I think its that one ) or are they legal with a Class A non restrictive.

N003k
August 27, 2009, 11:16 PM
Noooo select fire means you can select the fire mode...

We can have Safe/Semi, Safe/Burst, Safe/Full. But not any combination that lets you select the fire mode other then safe or "Gun goes bang".

Yellowfin
August 28, 2009, 09:52 AM
I can't think of that many guns that are full auto only, can you? I guess the 1918 BAR is one.

General Geoff
August 28, 2009, 10:28 AM
M134 Minigun :)


edit; actually, certain minigun variants have selectable firing rates (3,000 or 6,000rpm, for example). Would this count as select-fire as it pertains to CT law?

rocky branch
August 28, 2009, 11:23 AM
That is a prize winning nutty law.

They made me carry a M2 during my 1st tour in VN.
I was an advisor and carried the same as the troops.
I hated that little popgun as a weapon.

Art Eatman
August 28, 2009, 12:49 PM
I think I'd start with a Class III dealer for information. Knowing that sort of thing as to legal requirements is part of his business deal. Odds are, he'd also know of competent gunsmiths who could do the modifications.

PTK
August 28, 2009, 12:55 PM
I think I'd start with a Class III dealer for information. Knowing that sort of thing as to legal requirements is part of his business deal. Odds are, he'd also know of competent gunsmiths who could do the modifications.
Unfortunately, it's a very uncommon request - only CT needs that modification. :)

I haven't been able to dig up the folks I've seen in the past, yet...

kanook
August 28, 2009, 01:20 PM
I think the least expensive route will be to modify your sear so the semi wil not work. The sear is changable so the alteration will be reversable if you decide to move again. Just an idea that will work but I don't know if it will be accepted.

You could also drill a hole thru your selector lever and trigger housing and install a roll pin but that would be more of a perminant alteration unless you get another housing and lever.

PTK
August 28, 2009, 01:24 PM
kanook

In many guns, the sear is the registered part. Modify it, and... well.... ruin your $15,000 investment.

freakshow10mm
August 28, 2009, 02:23 PM
You need clarification by a legal entity in CT on exactly what "selective fire" means.

Any Class 2 or gunsmith can modify the weapon.

PTK
August 28, 2009, 02:29 PM
freakshow10mm - believe it or not, the CT state police have stated more than once that anything safe/semi/burst/auto or safe/semi/burst or safe/semi/auto is "select fire", while safe/burst, safe/auto are both legal in CT with the MG stamp.

kanook
August 28, 2009, 03:01 PM
In many guns, the sear is the registered part. Modify it, and... well.... ruin your $15,000 investmentGood point. There are many M1 that have a sear, transfer bar, trigger housing, #9 spring and so on as the registered part. I jumped to conclusion when it was OP'ed M2 and figured it was a receiver registration not sear.

mp510
August 28, 2009, 10:42 PM
You need clarification by a legal entity in CT on exactly what "selective fire" means.

Select fire means the user can choose between semi and auto/burst fire.

Give Joel Cramer/ Remarcable Arms in Wallingford a call. He is one of the foremost 07/02 FFL's in the state and could probably hook you up with somebody to do the conversion. Their phone number is: 203.284.9506. Their website is: http://www.remarcablearms.com/

ThrottleJockey72
August 28, 2009, 10:56 PM
Unfortunately, it's a very uncommon request - only CT needs that modification.

I haven't been able to dig up the folks I've seen in the past, yet...
NEEDS may be too strong a word.....and if you have to "dig" them up, there's your hint.....
In many guns, the sear is the registered part. Modify it, and... well.... ruin your $15,000 investment
Incorrect. The only way it's gonna cost that much is if it is already FA-SF and on the registry. In this case your good to go the way you got it. I think it would be SUBSTANTIALLY less to buy a semi auto brand new and convert it.

freakshow10mm
August 29, 2009, 12:59 AM
Select fire means the user can choose between semi and auto/burst fire.
Yes, I'm fully aware of what select fire means as firearm nomenclature.:rolleyes:

Many times legal definitions are not what standard industry definitions are. Case in point: barrel length. In the industry they are different for pistols and revolvers but in DNR regulations it's from the breach face to the muzzle for both, meaning a 4 inch barreled revolver (industry method) is actually 4 inches plus the cylinder length (DNR method).

mp510
August 30, 2009, 12:08 AM
Freakshow- The no select fire clause is part of our state AWB. In addition to copying the federal name ban list and features count, they decided to be "technically accurate" as well-- actually, I'm giving them too much credit. The anti that wrote the bill thought it would redefine all machineguns in as assault weapons in Connecticut. Seems he was wrong. I consider myself familiar with our AWB.

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