Idaho bags its first wolf


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Grizfire
September 1, 2009, 10:13 PM
Well wolf hunting in Idaho got under way today since judge Molloy of Missoula has not made a decision yet on stopping it. It didn't take long to bag one...

http://www.missoulian.com/news/local/article_14e17656-9748-11de-80d8-001cc4c03286.html

BOISE, Idaho - Gray wolves were back in hunters' crosshairs Tuesday, just months after they were removed from the federal endangered species list and eight decades since being hunted to extinction across the Northern Rockies.

Hunters in Idaho began stalking gray wolves in a handful of districts in the central and northern mountains. Shortly after dawn, an Idaho real estate agent became the first to report a kill.

Robert Millage of the lumber town of Kamiah bagged an adult female from 25 yards away in the mountains near the Lochsa River, state officials said.

"I just wanted to beat my buddies to the punch, but I didn't know I'd beaten everybody in the state," said Millage, 34, who has hunted in Idaho for 22 years. "It was really an adrenaline rush to have those wolves all around me, howling and milling about after I fired the shot."

It remained unclear, however, just how much longer hunters would have to thin the wolf population in Idaho and Montana, which is scheduled to open its season in two weeks.

U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy in Montana was expected to rule soon on a request by environmental groups to stop the hunts in both states.

"The human population successfully eradicated wolves from this region in the early part of the 20th century, and it would be a true shame after all the efforts that went into recovery if that happened again," said Jenny Harbine, an attorney for Earthjustice, a plaintiff in the case.

An estimated 1,650 of the animals now live in the Northern Rockies thanks to a controversial reintroduction program that started in 1995.

Idaho set a quota of 220 wolves for this hunting season as part of its plan for managing the wolf population. The quota is 75 in Montana.

Idaho officials say they have no idea how many hunters headed into the woods to track the predators. State rules require hunters to notify game officials within 24 hours of a wolf kill and present the skull and pelt to wardens within five days.

So far, Idaho has sold more than 10,700 wolf permits, mostly to hunters who will head to the backcountry next month when elk and deer season begins. Hunters in Montana snatched up more than 2,600 tags on Monday, the first day of sales for the upcoming hunt.

The wolves were removed from the endangered species list in those states just four months ago. The environmental groups fear there aren't enough state protections in place to maintain their comeback.

The creatures were once abundant across North America, but by the 1930s had been largely exterminated outside Alaska and Canada.

About 300 wolves in Wyoming are still under federal protection because the government has not approved the state's management plan.

Last year, about a dozen wolves were killed in Wyoming during a brief period when the state management plan declared wolves wandering outside established recovery zones could be shot and killed on sight. That policy was later scrapped by a federal judge.

Idaho officials and hunting guides say the opening weeks of the season are likely to be slow.

Outfitters said they are not booking trips for hunters exclusively looking to bag a wolf. But guides are encouraging clients to buy wolf tags to have handy when tracking deer and elk later this fall.

"Any success we have with wolves will be more of a happenstance sort of thing," said Richard Huff, a guide for Silver Spur Outfitters and Lodge near Grangeville.

Wolves are difficult to track because they move 30 to 50 miles a day, and hunters can't use bait or artificial calls.

"But I can tell you if I see one it's going to be adios," Huff said.

I'm maybe a little surprise the first wolf was taken in the lochsa region, I was figuring the more open country down south...

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/cms/hunt/wolf/dau09.jpg

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ArmedBear
September 1, 2009, 10:19 PM
Funny thing is, native wolves WEREN'T eradicated from Idaho by humans.

These introduced wolves did it.

Why the obsession with wolves? They're not the only thing that humans have displaced.

Why not also reintroduce millions of bison -- they also give wolves something to eat. The "Earthjustice" offices would be a good place to start the reintroduction.

IdahoLT1
September 2, 2009, 01:01 AM
A hunter from Emmett killed one at Bull trout lake near stanley. He had his tag but came out of his tent to see one molesting/harrassing his horse, so he shot it. Too bad his tag was used for that. In Idaho, its legal to shoot a wolf thats harrassing livestock or domestic animals.

Funny thing about reintroduction of animals ArmedB is that Grizzly Bears used to have territory well into California. Its on the State flag for crying out loud.

IdahoLT1
September 2, 2009, 01:03 AM
And the hunter who got the first one used a coyote call but made it to sound like it was injured. He said the wolf came to him very fast where he shot it at 25yds.

caribou
September 2, 2009, 01:35 AM
I LOVE to shoot Wolves :D

I just love the big furry $$$ makers and shoot every one I can for fun and profit, and often, in winter, their dead skins hang about my hood. :D

Wolves eat Coyotes, and an injured one is an easy meal.

Some Brown Bears in LA would make it interesting, as I saw way too many crackheads and homless there......Ahhhhhh, Paradise...it was so scary, I came back to the Tundra, where its safe with Wolves and Bears....screw LA.

I, too, heard Wolves werent killed off in Idaho by people, they were just too cuddly to hunt........ it was ciggeretts......:rolleyes:

Grizfire
September 2, 2009, 01:47 AM
Hey Caribou, ever tried wolf jerky? Suppose you could teach us southern, continental US folk a thing or two about wolf huntin'.

jim in Anchorage
September 2, 2009, 01:49 AM
I LOVE to shoot Wolves

I just love the big furry $$$ makers and shoot every one I can for fun and profit, and often, in winter, their dead skins hang about my hood.

Wolves eat Coyotes, and an injured one is an easy meal.

Some Brown Bears in LA would make it interesting, as I saw way too many crackheads and homless there......Ahhhhhh, Paradise...it was so scary, I came back to the Tundra, where its safe with Wolves and Bears....screw LA.

I, too, heard Wolves werent killed off in Idaho by people, they were just too cuddly to hunt........ it was ciggeretts......
__________________

Taxed to pay for their health care, of course.:evil:

caribou
September 2, 2009, 03:51 AM
LOL!!
They say, 'round here at least, if you have to eat wolf, you will always be hungry......it takes a starving guy to dine on such, even in this Artic land, familiar with starvations.


I howl 'em in.
Owoooooooooooooooooooooo...........Owooooooooooooooooooooooo....Ow , Ow owooooooooooooooooooooooooo.......... Yep, just as loud as I can.

Get comfy in a willow thicket and let loose every 5 minutes with your best Lon Chaney immataion, and see who howls back and comes in to see who in their territory.
I also spot them in areas where the Caribou are feeding, and those guys wont move much , unless somethings bugging them. I watch and see what that something is and then go get it.
Kill 'em all :D
http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g71/edwardhailstone/th_yjsttyjh61.jpg (http://s53.photobucket.com/albums/g71/edwardhailstone/?action=view&current=yjsttyjh61.jpg)
http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g71/edwardhailstone/th_HPIM1856.jpg (http://s53.photobucket.com/albums/g71/edwardhailstone/?action=view&current=HPIM1856.jpg)
Fur, guys, fur. No meal there, but I'll tell you, its not an easy animal to skin when frozen, but when I do score, I try and skin them quickly, and only take home the skin, sometimes the skull.
Here is what happens when you just pile 'em on the sled....Blood all over all of em below....ughhhhhhhhh:rolleyes:
http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g71/edwardhailstone/th_IMAG0130.jpg (http://s53.photobucket.com/albums/g71/edwardhailstone/?action=view&current=IMAG0130.jpg)

cheff
September 2, 2009, 08:46 PM
A hunter from Emmett killed one at Bull trout lake near stanley

Bull trout lake... man that brings memories. There is a small lake close to there called Martin lake, I caught my first trout and many more after that there. My daughter caught her first and many more there.......

I can believe this wolf was shot there. Man I would have liked to have seen that. Hope the hunt is still going next year, I just might head up there and give it a try while fishing :)

IdahoLT1
September 3, 2009, 01:54 AM
Another was called in earlier this morning, totaling 3 on opening day. The state requires 24hour notification to F&G and 5 days to show hide and skull.

Grizfire
September 3, 2009, 02:30 AM
Here is a pic of the first wolf, same as in article...

http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/missoulian.com/content/tncms/assets/editorial/7/28/da3/728da378-9780-11de-afee-001cc4c002e0.preview-300.jpg?_dc=1251868880

http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/missoulian.com/content/tncms/assets/editorial/b/33/0b4/b330b406-9780-11de-add0-001cc4c002e0.image.jpg?_dc=1251868989

caribou
September 3, 2009, 03:40 AM
Puppy.:D

Too bad its fur isnt full up......Mid winter pelts are magnificent, but hey, get what you can, when you can, eh?:)
Ive caught Wolves so big, I had to tie he head into the sled so I could lift the rest of the body in. Heavy, floppy and not much to grab when they're fat.
Call in the Pack, anf the Lead Wolves will either be first (If they are in "Kill" mode) or last, as the young ones will get curious and will just have to have a look see.
We call 'em "Young 'n' dumb".....evn had some run across the vally to my snowgo's headlights, before realizing I was hunting them, and then it was just too late.....:evil:

kdstrick
September 3, 2009, 03:49 AM
Here is a pic of the first wolf, same as in article...





AWWWWWW! It looks so cute all cuddled up with your backpack and rifle there, and I can see how much you love it by the hug.

You should immediately apply for PETA membership with your photo's to exhibit your love for animals! ;)

usmc1371
September 3, 2009, 05:20 PM
I am glad to see the saw tooth mtn's are open, I elk hunted there in 05 and there were plenty of wolves then just no leagle way to take a shot at one. My guide said they could be called in with an elk calf call or just cow chirps. I would like to buy that judge a beer for growing a pair and not bending over for the domestic terroist groups known as PETA/ALF/WWF!!! I know the wolves are comming to oregon there is just no way to stop them I just wonder if we will ever have a chance to hunt them.

TheIrishJedi
September 3, 2009, 07:35 PM
They're good lookin' animals. Anything that looks like a doggy I tend to feel kinda bad for hunting wise. But I'd still shoot one.

ArmedBear
September 3, 2009, 07:39 PM
They should never have been released here in the first place.

Idaho HAD indigenous wolves, but they were smaller and less aggressive. These wolves imported from Canada wiped out actual endangered American wolves.

Humans are a perfectly fine apex predator, if there were concerns about an excess elk population. Elk is good food, for those without much money, and for those with plenty of cash to spend on outfitters and guides here in Idaho.

Personally, I think these are beautiful animals, and it's a crying shame that they need to be shot. But they do need to be. their population does need to be brought under control. They should have been left in Canada.

Cosmoline
September 3, 2009, 07:59 PM
I'm all in favor of reintroducing griz to California. As well as giant boar and black bear to the British Isles--the home of PETA and the RSPCA.

.Mid winter pelts are magnificent, but hey, get what you can, when you can, eh

I wonder if they'd even get that much fur in Idaho. Unless it gets truly cold I doubt they'd need it.

IdahoLT1
September 3, 2009, 10:59 PM
ive felt -25F before in boise(in my short life) and the southwestern part of idaho is warm compared to the central part.

kd7nqb
September 4, 2009, 02:24 AM
I would love to hunt Wolves but don't see it coming to Western Oregon soon.

Big Bill
September 5, 2009, 01:21 AM
I think we should rescue those poor polar bears who are doing so much swimming these days because it is so hot up thar in the big north country and put them in Washington D.C.

There's plenty of dumbass there that they could feed on!

longdayjake
September 5, 2009, 01:20 PM
Im in southeast Idaho where there arent supposed to be any wolves yet. Well, I saw one a year ago. It was so big I thought it was a deer at first. It was runnign along the road and once I drove up close enough to see it, it took off down a clearing. It was amazing how big and beautiful it was. If I get one this year (I won't) I am going to have it mounted.

ArmedBear
September 5, 2009, 05:47 PM
Im in southeast Idaho where there arent supposed to be any wolves yet.

If they don't exist, you don't need a tag.:D

Dave P
September 5, 2009, 06:19 PM
"As well as giant boar and black bear to the British Isles "

Would you settle for "Werewolves in London!"???

IdahoLT1
October 14, 2009, 11:47 PM
A little more than a month into the hunts and we are 52 wolves harvested out of 220. The endo of the season is Dec 31 in some zones and March 31 in the remaining zones. as of now, 220 looks do-able. Keep 'em coming guys

ArmedBear
October 15, 2009, 12:08 AM
I have to grab a tag. Who knows, I might see one.

I think I saw one north of Eagle, but it was on private land and gone fast. Surprised to see it close to town, but if it wasn't a wolf, it was one hell of a big, stocky coyote.

SHvar
October 16, 2009, 01:19 PM
"Funny thing is, native wolves WEREN'T eradicated from Idaho by humans.

These introduced wolves did it."

Let me guess, some anti-wolf organization told you that one?

"They should never have been released here in the first place."

They should never have been killed off by people in the first place.

"Idaho HAD indigenous wolves, but they were smaller and less aggressive. These wolves imported from Canada wiped out actual endangered American wolves."


Im all for hunting, but Im all for having our native ecosystems intact, which includes (heres a wolf education for you) the top predator which belongs here in America, the gray wolf.
I cant stand to see this misinformation being spread on internet forums about introduced wolves being bigger, more aggressive, hungrier, and the biggest lie which is that they killed off the native wolves. Thats like saying that the nazis didnt kill the jews in Europe before and during WW2, its like saying that the other jews killed them, give me a break, at least try to make it sound closer to the truth.
Some more wolf education for you..
In North America, Europe, Asia, the canis lupus (gray wolf) are all the same species, aside from canis lupus arctos (arctic wolf, a subspecies of the gray wolf), canis rufus (red wolf), canis lupus baileyi (mexican gray wolf), all gray wolves in North America are the same exact subspecies. The term "Canadian grays" came from the anti wolf demonstrators, and the beef industry when the wolves were first brought back here.

Heck the domesticated dog is less than 2 tenths of a percent different genetically than a gray wolf (these differences are for a wolves more intense behaviors). The physical differences have to do with genetic switches (contained by both) that are activated or not activated by environment, need and behavior.
By all means, hunt them legally, do so with reason, respect their place in our country, they were here long before us, and hopefully long after us.
Gorgeous animals.

ArmedBear
October 16, 2009, 02:10 PM
Im all for hunting, but Im all for having our native ecosystems intact, which includes (heres a wolf education for you) the top predator which belongs here in America, the gray wolf.

Bring back the prey, bring back the predators. Don't just toss a bunch of wolves into a severely disturbed ecosystem and pretend that's "intact". That's ludicrous.

The physical differences have to do with genetic switches (contained by both) that are activated or not activated by environment, need and behavior.

That's right.

There are 37 subspecies, but all can interbreed, as can domestic dogs with wolves, at least physically (i.e. if they don't kill each other). Subspecies are irrelevant, really.

The amazing morphological differences possible within the genome of the species is clearly seen in the variety of breeds of domestic canines.

The European Gray Wolf and the Canadian Gray Wolf can interbreed.

You are speaking purely from emotion.

all gray wolves in North America are the same exact subspecies

Idaho's native wolf population was genetically the same, but SO ARE MY DOGS. Furthermore, all domestic dogs are considered to be the same subspecies. That doesn't mean an aggressive Irish Wolfhound might not kill off all the Pomeranians it can find.

You offer no evidence that the more robust Canadian population didn't wipe out the local wolves. Whether or not they're classified as the same subspecies, distinct populations exist, with morpholgical and behavioral differences -- a point which you make, but seem not to recognize.

I cant stand to see this misinformation being spread on internet forums about introduced wolves being bigger, more aggressive, hungrier, and the biggest lie which is that they killed off the native wolves. Thats like saying that the nazis didnt kill the jews in Europe before and during WW2, its like saying that the other jews killed them, give me a break, at least try to make it sound closer to the truth.

Again, stupid emotionalism. No evidence, no science.

respect their place in our country, they were here long before us, and hopefully long after us.
Gorgeous animals.

Pure aesthetics. That's fine, but no more objectively valid than "I love cockroaches!"

Animal pictures on t-shirts don't make for sound ecosystem management policies.

Bring back the Bison, bring back the wolves. I'd love to see some more serious restoration. Salmon, too, all the way to the Salmon River and Salmon, Idaho.

But importing these wolves makes for an "intact ecosystem" no more than turning loose all the dogs in the local shelter.

These animals are nothing but the virtual pets of people from the other end of the country, who think they are aesthetically pleasing. There's no large-scale plan to restore the ecosystem or its original animal inhabitants.

caribou
October 16, 2009, 07:12 PM
There is absolutly NO evidence, No science in this entire thread.:banghead:



I hunt wolves all winter long, and thats a long 8 months in this Arctic.
Havent been skunked in 24 years. Funny thing is, there LOTS of game still:rolleyes:
My personal ,unscientific observations;

The problem of being outta balance where the Wolves are there, is Too many PEOPLE.:barf:
Now those people cant stand the competion for game and habitat, bitching and get all emotional about it ~~LOL!!~~
Here, in a borough the size of Illinois, we have less than 10,000 people, of all ages, and therefore the room and the Wolves , who are doing just what Wolves do, and its not a problem.

You guys should just enjoy the fact that the Wolves are there to hunt now, and no longer "Untouchable". :D

Now go hunt some Wolves!!

ArmedBear
October 16, 2009, 07:15 PM
You guys should just enjoy the fact that the Wolves are there to hunt now, and no longer "Untouchable".

Exactly. That was the only real problem with the wolves lately, IMO. Managing everything EXCEPT the wolves didn't add up.

WRT the overall ecosystem, there are bigger issues. You can't hunt the people, either. There won't be balance until that changes.;)

Back in the 19th Century in Idaho, bears, wolves, bison, people, elk, deer, sheep, moose, mountain goats, coyotes all lived in harmony by killing each other with reckless abandon.

Bring back the huge herds of bison and prolific grizzlies, and the routine murders and human deaths by wild animal attack, and the ecosystem might be "in balance" again. Short of that, I think we can just try to manage it as best we can.:)

The_Shootist
October 16, 2009, 10:44 PM
Maybe introduce a few to Texas - help take care of the 'hawg problem.

jeepmor
October 17, 2009, 01:48 PM
I think they waited too long because the environmental groups do have a lot of political pull. I don't agree with it, but that's my take. In the meantime, the population just kept growing. On the bright side, it should allow plenty more hunting opportunities in the future to get the population in check.

I think it's great that the lower 48 has wolves again. However, I do think that they should have nursed the native population back to numbers instead of using Canadian wolves as stated.

Now the native population is likely completely eradicated by the larger wolves. And now gone forever.

jeepmor

coloradokevin
October 18, 2009, 04:48 AM
They're good lookin' animals. Anything that looks like a doggy I tend to feel kinda bad for hunting wise. But I'd still shoot one.

Personally, I can't do wolf or coyotes... I'm too much of a dog person! In fact, as I type this my dog is sitting next to me giving me the 'sad puppy dog eyes'.

To each their own, but I think I'll stick to animals I'm going to turn into food! If it looks like a steer, an elk, a bison, a moose, a deer, or a bird, it is probably consumable :)

ArmedBear
October 18, 2009, 09:03 PM
On the bright side, it should allow plenty more hunting opportunities in the future to get the population in check.


Like coloradokevin, I have no burning desire to shoot them. "Hunting opportunities" for me would be more about the deer and elk that the wolves killed, not shooting wolves.

IdahoLT1
November 13, 2009, 11:32 PM
So about a month later we reached the century mark. we have 100 of the 220 wolves harvested with 2 zones closed. The end of the season for some zones is the 31st of Dec. Keep 'em coming hunters

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/cms/hunt/wolf/quota.cfm

ArmedBear
November 14, 2009, 12:28 AM
I think I saw one on the outskirts of Eagle. I only had a quail gun, and I don't think it was legal for me to hunt there...

slabuda
November 14, 2009, 01:12 AM
I think I saw one on the outskirts of Eagle. I only had a quail gun, and I don't think it was legal for me to hunt there...

Well they are in the Danskins, its not that far of a run while chasing the deer as they move down from higher elevations.

Ive said it before, wont be long before they are just north of Mt Home harassing cattle.

dragonriot
November 15, 2009, 01:47 PM
I'm confused... As of July 3rd 2009, Gray Wolves were placed back on the FEDERAL Endangered species list, which means it is illegal to hunt them in all 50 states.... The Judge shouldn't have to make a decision in Idaho, the Fed already made it for him.

On that note... There is science in this thread. It is absolutely true that humans eliminated the wolves in all of their natural range, and that there were less than 500 wolves left in the entire lower 48 as of 1960... Those 500 wolves were limited to Minnesota and the U.P.

There is ZERO physical difference between Canadian gray wolves and American gray wolves, they are the same animal, and all average about 75lbs for males, and 60lbs for females, with their range going from 50-100lbs... Occasionally, you might find the big boy of a pack running about 120lbs, but that's rare unless you're in northern Canada or Alaska.

The wolves that were reintroduced to Idaho, Wisconsin, Michigan and the rest of the Midwest, are all from the original remaining stock in Minnesota and the U.P. They either dispersed across state lines on their own, or they were trapped and relocated by local DNR programs who realize that a small population of wolves not only prevents extinction, but keeps the deer populations from destroying themselves with disease and CWD. If you don't know what CWD is, and why wolves would have anything to do with the spread of it, it's the deer/elk/moose version of Mad Cow Disease, and wolves historically pick out the weakest members of the deer herd, so they are in essence, culling the herd so we have healthier animals to shoot at.

In Wisconsin, the wolves have moved beyond the range that the DNR says they are... They promise that the wolves are not south of highway 10, the midstate line... We've seen them south of Highway 10, the deer are in hiding because of them, but all in all, the wolves are a benefit to the state, and to the country. With a deer population exploding over 2.5 million each year after the harvest in Wisconsin, I welcome a few wolves to cull the herd, and keep the status quo on the deer population. Hunters can't kill enough deer in a season to keep the population from exploding, but the wolves can.

gallo
November 15, 2009, 02:31 PM
These animals look too much like my dog. I wouldn't hunt them for sport, but only in self defense or to protect my live stock. But to each his own.

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