Wash-Post Article on Gun Purchasing Proccess


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627PCFan
September 2, 2009, 11:18 AM
Found this today on the Washington Post. (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/09/01/AR2009090103836.html?hpid=artslot&sid=ST2009090103944)


I took 2 things away from it.
1. The writer is someone who should not own a firearm because hes not comfortable with every aspect of it.
2. Any bad guy in the MD/DV/VA area now knows how many family members there are in his household, and they are unarmed-

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Mike J
September 2, 2009, 12:07 PM
Makes me glad I don't live in D.C. Seems kinda weird for a grown man to be that freaked out by having a gun. I guess a lot of it just comes down to where/how you were raised. What you were taught & exposed to.

Tommygunn
September 2, 2009, 12:31 PM
The first time I had a gun in my hand like that I was a tad ... "freaked." Not as much as this author, I guess, because even though I'd never owned one I'd shot guns before.
One gets over it.

Makes me glad I don't live in D.C.


+1 !!!!!!!!!

Warhawk83
September 2, 2009, 12:47 PM
Zeuss throwing lightning bolts...:rolleyes:

That guy definitely doesn't need a gun, he would be the guy we read about that shoots his wife when he thinks she is an intruder. Maybe she is the one that needs to learn to shoot...

The process to attaining a firearm in that slumhole of a Capitol is ridiculous. Why don't these people understand that all they are doing is making potential victims jump through hoops? Bad guys steal weapons, buy illegal unregistered weapons, and shoot people. Bleeding heart morons.

MarineOne
September 2, 2009, 01:47 PM
I liked the part about the "wild-eyed murdering-rapist crack addict" breaking into the house.


Classic.



Kris

Moo 2 Drvr
September 2, 2009, 02:02 PM
I use to live in DC. What he described about the process is very accurate. I registered one of the first semiautos last fall. What a PITA.

The police in the firearms unit don't like the rules either, but they don't make the rules. I'm glad the Heller legal team is suing DC to allow open or concealed carry. But the DC council will fight to the death to prevent it. Those people will never change.

Now I live across the river in the free Commonwealth of Virginia. What a breath of fresh air in comparison. I will never go back.

jfh
September 2, 2009, 02:18 PM
AFAICT, it accurately portrays both the DC purchase-ownership process and a non-gunny's experience in getting and shooting his first firearm.

More importantly, this article reflects the metro-type non-gunnies' perspective--and by getting it out there to a typical DC readership, will make many readers / viewers more familiar with firearms ownership.

With familiarization comes less demonization. In the culture wars, this can only help 'our side.'

Jim H.

Carl Levitian
September 2, 2009, 02:18 PM
I think it's great, and I aplaud the writer. It's a victory for our side when a far left liberal writer for the post deceides to keep shooting at a rental range. It means his eyes are a little more open toward our side of things, and one more ally is not a bad thing. Even if he's a screaming liberal post writer. At least he's trying. At least he's thinking about the other side of the coin.

That's a h--l of a lot more than the Brady bunch would do!

natman
September 2, 2009, 02:31 PM
It is a very well written article, both from the point of view of a brand new owner and as documentation of the hurdles DC puts in the way of exercising a constitutional right.

Can you imagine the uproar if, say, a southern state put up the same sort of hurdles in order to vote? :eek:

TX1911fan
September 2, 2009, 02:41 PM
In general, very positive. He still trades on some stereotypes, but the fact that he picked it up as a hobby was encouraging. The cop was classic.

NinjaFeint
September 2, 2009, 02:46 PM
Interesting read. It's good to see a press article where the reporter talks about the conflicts he has with ownership but not necessarily being against allowing ownership.

Madcap_Magician
September 2, 2009, 03:07 PM
I think this was a high-quality and honest article about someone who admits his lack of knowledge about guns and his initial bias against them and does his best to be fair-minded and learn.

LlanoEstacado
September 2, 2009, 04:26 PM
A column writer for the Washington Post stating that he enjoys shooting and plans to visit the range....he better start looking for a new job, his days are numbered.

cerberus65
September 2, 2009, 04:51 PM
$125 for an FFL transfer? Ouch!

And I was ROFL at his description of the doom-bringing .38 special. :rolleyes:

Did anyone else notice that the District shot his gun but he hasn't? That's just not right!

In the end, it's disappointing that he isn't going to keep it (although it _is_ a Taurus so who can really blame him :-). I sure hope he never needs it.

Turbobuddha
September 2, 2009, 04:51 PM
Actually, nice little article. Reminds you than not all of us have grown up shooting empty cans off the fence or knowing there was always a loaded firearm close by. Does a nice job of highlighting the difficulty and expense of getting a firearm in DC. Hopefully, it's intent is not to sell that process to the rest of us. What a pain.

And, are there really only 550 gun owners in DC? So, uh, who's doing all the shooting then? Seems to be more people killed by handguns there than there are handgun owners! Hmmmmmm...very intersting.

Moo 2 Drvr
September 2, 2009, 06:09 PM
Actually, there were 104,391 registered firearms in DC last February. Obviously, there are many more unregistered firearms. When I registered my first shotgun in DC it only took me about five days.

At the time I was told that ten years ago it could take as long as two years to get approved to register a firearm in DC.:cuss:

So from that perspective, things are looking up.

Meesh
September 2, 2009, 07:35 PM
I am a recent "convert" from being uneasy about guns to wanting one of my own. From the first time I went to the range during a gun safety and handling class (all just a week and half ago!) I decided I most definitely want my own gun -- will the Universe implode when I slip a NRA card into my wallet next to my NPR member card? Glad I live in Virginia, although I was pretty shocked to realize how easy it is here, I think DC is rather over the top.

My husband pointed the article out to me this morning. (Off this thread, after another item in the news caught his eye, a woman at a Metro station about three miles from our house was stuffed into her trunk and driven around for an hour before being released, mercifully unharmed physically, he said he can start seeing my point about wanting to carry).

yokel
September 2, 2009, 08:13 PM
It seems a shame that the writer feels compelled to act in such a cringing, obsequious, and deferential manner to his spouse.

Rather defeats the purpose of the right to keep and bears arms, eh?

rs999
September 2, 2009, 08:23 PM
According to Warren VS DC, "police do not have a legal responsibility to provide personal protection to individuals, and absolved the police and the city of any liability."

With a ruling like this from DC's court of appeals, shouldn't there be more citizens with guns in DC?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren_v._District_of_Columbia

KarenTOC
September 2, 2009, 08:25 PM
It seems a shame that the writer feels compelled to act in such a cringing, obsequious, and deferential manner to his spouse.

Rather defeats the purpose of the right to keep and bears arms, eh?

Either that, or it demonstrates the respect he has for his wife's feelings.

Buck Nekkid
September 2, 2009, 08:27 PM
I came to handguns late in life. I had hunted with shotguns and .22's since I was a tyke, but we never had handguns. I got interested in Cowboy Action Shooting in the late 90's and bought my first handgun--actually a pair of Ruger Vaqueros. As Texas had recently passed concealed carry I decided I needed to become responsible for my own safety.

My first CCW handgun? A Taurus Model 85, just like the author of the Post article. I, too, felt the thrill of shooting that little snubbie and the rest is history. My collection of handguns numbers over 15 joined by 5 or 6 long guns. And it all started with a Taurus .38 Special.

Rundownfid
September 2, 2009, 09:10 PM
Perhaps someone in the DC area could contact the writer and invite him to attend a range session and perhaps an IDPA match? This guy seems genuinely interested and is a thoughtful and apparently honest reporter (ya why is he working for the Post then?).

Were I closer I'd contact him myself, any takers?

yokel
September 2, 2009, 09:11 PM
...demonstrates the respect he has for his wife's feelings.

Indeed, we see how negative feelings and emotions can overwhelm a rational approach to not being victimized in a criminal assault.

And, as far as I can glean, there was no discussion, and there was no argument.

searcher451
September 3, 2009, 12:08 AM
Thanks for the link to this one; I'm glad I had the opportunity to read it and likely would have missed it otherwise. It's a good story and serves a good purpose: informing those who aren't believers, the writer included. We could actually benefit from more articles like this one, IMO.

dev_null
September 3, 2009, 12:15 AM
I had an acquaintance (who happens to live in DC, as a matter of fact), tell me that she wouldn't be comfortable with a gun because she might somehow accidentally shoot holes all over her apartment walls. All I could do was ask if owning a kitchen knife meant she might accidentally slash all the curtains?

RP88
September 3, 2009, 12:47 AM
It seems a shame that the writer feels compelled to act in such a cringing, obsequious, and deferential manner to his spouse.

Arguing with a spouse is never a good thing, usually. You're either gonna be right, or you're gonna be happy, but never at the same time.:neener:

I think it was a good article with a nice ending. It does highlight how different life perspectives (i.e. never shooting a gun, being married with a kid in the house, living in a place that restricts ownership, thus making it hard to get introduced into firearms, etc.) affect one's view on firearms.

jfh
September 3, 2009, 12:48 AM
KarenTOC has started to figure out her way around THR--I hope you will, too. You might stumble into some brisk repartee, even some sexism, but it's a wholly-healthy community of gunnies here.

Meesh, keep going on the education, and once you get squared away with your firearm(s), practice, practice, practice.

FWIW, I don't keep my Life NRA card next to my MPR card--but I am a sustaining member of MPR, and I basically listen to MPR (Minnesota) 18/7.

Jim H.

sharkman
September 3, 2009, 10:42 AM
I learned something from that article. Namely, that a .38 special will make someones head "explode!" I'm trading all of my .45's and .40's now for for some of those awesome .38's!

Fryerpower
September 3, 2009, 12:21 PM
Maryland seller to DC buyer: $35 for the seller to transfer it to the DC FFL. $125 for the DC FFL to issue it to the buyer.

Huntsville, Alabama to a Fayetteville, Tennessee buyer: $0 for the seller to drive a load of sold guns up to Fayetteville every Thursday to the FFL. $10 for the FFL, his main business is a hardware store, to issue it to the buyer.

Man I love this state!

-Jim

eatont9999
September 3, 2009, 12:36 PM
I love the head-exploding thimble comment. That is really cute. I hope he does not need to use that gun in a hurry since it is locked in a box in a drawer. Don't lose the key!

xsquidgator
September 3, 2009, 01:43 PM
Perhaps someone in the DC area could contact the writer and invite him to attend a range session and perhaps an IDPA match? This guy seems genuinely interested and is a thoughtful and apparently honest reporter (ya why is he working for the Post then?).

Were I closer I'd contact him myself, any takers?

I think that's an excellent idea. Does anyone have a link to his email address for this purpose? I could not find it on the Post's website. If he happens to travel down to Florida sometime, I'd be glad to host him for a range day/IDPA shooting experience that would be fun and informative.

Fryerpower
September 3, 2009, 02:21 PM
Virginia listing:
http://www.idpa.com/clublist.asp?state=VA

Chantilly, VA listing:
http://www.blueridgearsenal.com/

Blue Ridge Arsenal
Chantilly, VA
USA
2nd Wed. of the month
Malcolm Blundell

Maryland listing:
http://www.idpa.com/clublist.asp?state=MD

-Jim

jfh
September 3, 2009, 04:14 PM
I could not find his e-mail address, either.

However, this link (http://projects.washingtonpost.com/staff/articles/christian+davenport/) takes you to a page where you may submit a comment to him. Note that it does NOT go by one's personal e-mail client--so you might want to make a copy in WordPad / whatever, and save it for inclusion in a possible return e-mail from him.

FWIW, I sent him props yesterday after I read the article and saw the video.

Jim H.

MAKster
September 4, 2009, 12:57 PM
There is also a video on the web site of the author shooting. Pretty good for a beginner. Although the guy who teaches him the safety class is interesting. He is wearing a tactical outfit with a badge on his hip and "Security" on the back of his shirt.

mrokern
September 4, 2009, 04:00 PM
There is also a video on the web site of the author shooting. Pretty good for a beginner. Although the guy who teaches him the safety class is interesting. He is wearing a tactical outfit with a badge on his hip and "Security" on the back of his shirt.
The article says that the instructor is actually a LEO.

It's actually a much more fair article than I was expecting. Like others here, I found his description of shooting a .38 amusing, but if you stop to think about it, if his only other experience had been .22 rifles years ago, that .38 is going to seem like a .500mag to him.

The other mention in there I had to smile about was his wife's reaction. I grew up in a seriously anti-gun household, where my mother was terrified at the thought of even seeing a gun.

When we got married, my wife originally told me that she would prefer if my guns were stored unloaded in the basement. She wasn't anti, but had grown up in a guns-are-for-hunting household. I then took her shooting, and walked her through books like "More Guns, Less Crime". She now knows how to get to and operate every gun we own (note the "we"), and would not hesitate to defend herself.

SWDoc
September 4, 2009, 06:15 PM
Excellent article and video. Thoughtful and provided a starting point for discussion.

Steve

mm1ut1
September 4, 2009, 07:01 PM
When the story was first released it was prominately displayed, top of the page on the website. After a few positive comments it was pretty much hidden.

jakemccoy
September 4, 2009, 07:19 PM
I watched the video. It's quite good! I'll add it to my Youtube channel if I can figure out how to download it.

Not everybody grew up with guns in their house. The guy in the video who's going through the process of buying a gun is representative of a large number of people in America. It's the group of people who are gun-ignorant, but not anti-gun.

jakemccoy
September 4, 2009, 07:28 PM
According to Warren VS DC, "police do not have a legal responsibility to provide personal protection to individuals, and absolved the police and the city of any liability."

With a ruling like this from DC's court of appeals, shouldn't there be more citizens with guns in DC?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warren_v._District_of_Columbia

A Supreme Court decision (Castle Rock v. Gonzalez) says basically the same thing. I like to cite the Supreme Court when I can. Plus, the Castle Rock case is from 2005 (a.o.t. the 1981 Warren case).

http://www.allsafedefense.com/news/CopsDontProtect.htm
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,162325,00.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Rock_v._Gonzales

SuperNaut
September 4, 2009, 07:43 PM
As a licensed firearms dealer, he could, theoretically, sell guns. But he chooses not to because "I don't want to have to carry an inventory," he says. "Too much liability." Instead, he's the middleman, the only licensed dealer willing to help D.C. residents acquire handguns, a nice little side business for which he charges $125.

So I head out of the city to Maryland Small Arms in Upper Marlboro. After shopping around a bit, I settle on a used Taurus Model 85 .38-caliber revolver. I like it because it's just like the one I used during my instruction, though smaller. And at $275, it was a relatively cheap beginner's gun, even though the dealer tacks on a $35 fee for transferring it to Sykes.

Wow, they are robbing the citizens blind with those fees!

Not to mention all the pointless driving, paperwork and wasted time. My sympathies go out to anyone who has to suffer these obstructions to exercise an inherent right.

ming
September 4, 2009, 07:53 PM
He says he's going back to the range and has a new hobby. Won't be long till he's a Member. Could you go to the range more than once and not want your own handgun? Not likely!

happygeek
September 4, 2009, 09:08 PM
Someone needs to send him a link to/info on some good gun safes. If he's so worried about having a gun in his home, but wants to shoot them at the range why not just get a good safe and keep that sucker locked up tight instead of paying to rent a gun at the range?

For that matter, he could always buy his ammo at the range and shoot it all,thereby not having any ammo at home; just a 38 locked up in a safe.

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