Mortars? Anyone know?


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VTKFJoe
September 8, 2009, 12:28 PM
Does anyone know what these are?

Thanks,

Joe

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starkadder
September 8, 2009, 12:43 PM
I may be wrong and I am sure that I will be corrected by someone more knowledgeable but I think that those are Hedge Hog rounds, the Hedge Hog was an anti submarine weapon used in WW2. It fired a volley of up to 48 high explosive rounds, and was a very effective anti submarine weapon, any one else?


This is this! It's not something else, it's this!

Don't pull it if you don't plan to use it, and don't use it if you don't plan to kill!

ALWAYS REMEMBER OUR MEN AND WOMEN OVER THERE.

Cosmoline
September 8, 2009, 12:49 PM
The scale is confusing, but I don't think they're anywhere near big enough to be hedgehogs. They look more like part of a little 2" or metric equivalent mortar kit. Prob. soviet.

eatont9999
September 8, 2009, 01:18 PM
I don't know what it is, but I could tell you what they look like...

eye5600
September 8, 2009, 01:18 PM
A little research suggests the the hedgehog had/has a 30lb charge, so I think that is ruled out.

VTKFJoe
September 8, 2009, 01:48 PM
They are about 2 inches across the widest part. They are about 6" long.

Not mine, a friend sent the picture and was wondering.

Dain Bramage
September 8, 2009, 02:02 PM
Bangalore Torpedoes?

BitterBeerFace
September 8, 2009, 02:41 PM
Can't ID for sure, but looks like a rack of practice bombs of some sort.

Harve Curry
September 8, 2009, 02:44 PM
Having no experience at all let me try and guess.

The projectiles are 2"x 6" long, 4 in a row of 5 (the 5th row just out of frame) so the box is about 30"x 20".
The Tube-pipe is mortar/rocket tube and contains the firing pin at the bottom so when set up and a projectile is dropped in the base hits the pin and off she goes. The hole is a pressure relief and you want to position that away from the operators (2?).

Wait they've all been drilled out, demilled. The hole in the tube don't belong there and several of the rocket/mortar rounds have the explosive end drilled out on the side.

highorder
September 8, 2009, 02:54 PM
Bangalore Torpedoes?

Those are simply explosive packed tubes. The have no projectile.

ambidextrous1
September 8, 2009, 02:58 PM
Funny comment, eatont! :cool:

PandaBearBG
September 8, 2009, 03:59 PM
I don't know any mortar that small, I'd say recoiless rifle but they have fins, maybe they are dropped from a plane? They don't look like they would fly to far, so maybe they are dropped?

Cosmoline
September 8, 2009, 04:36 PM
I think they're just 2" mortar bombs with a launching tube.

clem
September 8, 2009, 06:38 PM
Those are part of a sub-caliber training kit for the U.S. M29 81mm Mortar. They use .22 blanks as the propellant charge.
The long tube is the sub-caliber bore and fits in the 81mm barrel/tube.

They were a lot of fun to set up and practice with.

James T Thomas
September 8, 2009, 06:39 PM
Sorry, I don't know.

They do not look like ordinance however.
Possibly rounds for a Spigot mortar.


My guess would be some type of industrial tool for cleaning out pipe lines.

CWL
September 8, 2009, 07:04 PM
Possibly rounds for a Spigot mortar.

Spigot mortars are HUGE.

I first guessed Japanese knee mortar- but those don't have fins.

I think clem has it right.

4v50 Gary
September 8, 2009, 09:11 PM
Definitely not hedgehog rounds. Their warheads are more cylindrical. I'll put my money on Clem's comments.

clem
September 8, 2009, 09:39 PM
Gentlemen and ladies, I have it right because I HAVE USED THIS TRAINING DEVICE in the Corps!:D

Harve Curry
September 8, 2009, 09:46 PM
Clem,
So how old are they??

gunnerjones
September 8, 2009, 09:47 PM
I mortar is a tube like bazooka used for long distances. it sits on the ground and you aim it and drop the round in and boom its gone. they cove a area of 12 yards. or u can use the flare round with flares a light and slowly comes back down... hope this helps

clem
September 8, 2009, 09:58 PM
Clem,
So how old are they??
Harve,
We were using them in 1972 but I'll bet that they have been around for a while. Before the M29 Mortar there was the M1 which was used in WWII. Both are 81mm bores.

PandaBearBG
September 9, 2009, 01:02 AM
gunnerjones - depending what mortar you use, an 81mm with HE will have a 34 square meter kill radius, I think a 60 is about 25 sq m. There's HE, Illum, and Red Phosphorus too.

Harve Curry
September 9, 2009, 01:17 AM
Did the US reference them by inches or metric during WWII?

clem
September 9, 2009, 02:02 AM
This is a good site for info on U.S. Mortar ammunition;


http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/land/mortar_c.htm

ThrottleJockey72
September 9, 2009, 02:30 AM
Thank you Clem.
Wait they've all been drilled out, demilled. The hole in the tube don't belong there and several of the rocket/mortar rounds have the explosive end drilled out on the side.
Thank you God! Those thing don't appear safe in their condition.

GRIZ22
September 9, 2009, 08:54 AM
Did the US reference them by inches or metric during WWII?
__________________


60mm and 81mm and 4.2" mortars during WWII. 60 and 81 mms were infantry battalion assets. 4.2 is commonly referred to as four deuce. 4.2 were used in "Chemical Mortar Battalions" as the 4.2 was created to shoot chemical rounds. 4.2 was considered artillery and was attached to other units like airborne divisions and ranger battalions.

VTKFJoe
September 9, 2009, 10:25 AM
Thanks All. Thanks Clem.

CWL
September 9, 2009, 03:07 PM
Did the US reference them by inches or metric during WWII?

The US Army used metric measurements on all tube artillery and cannon but retained inches for small arms. The Navy used a mix, retaining inches for main guns (like on battleships), but adopted metric for secondary/anti-aircraft guns.

rcmodel
September 9, 2009, 03:14 PM
The army used a mix too.

We had 81MM and 4.2" mortars when I was in the service in the 60's-70's.

Not sure when they became 107mm, but they were Four-Deuce during Vietnam.

http://www.rt66.com/~korteng/SmallArms/4pt2.htm

We also had 8" track howitzers.
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ground/m110a2.htm

rc

Griff56
September 9, 2009, 03:24 PM
Well, I never saw anything like that in the .81 mm mortar ordnance while I was in Uncle Sam's
club. Not saying it could not be something developed after 1960 when I left the active service.\I would not think a .22 blank would have enough umph to ignite the cheese to hoist one of these out of the tube.
Maybe a 12 gauge shell, but not a .22.

Besides, I do not see any compression rings on the sides of them. JMHO YMMV

rcmodel
September 9, 2009, 03:52 PM
Clem gets the cigar!
This should settle it!

http://www.autoweapons.com/photos05/jun/mortartr.html

http://wardogmilitaria.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=40&products_id=515&zenid=b37ab65fa35b329bf64175dcdad0b82a

rc

Griff56
September 9, 2009, 04:18 PM
I stand corrected. Size does matter. LOL

Make that a good cigar for Clem.

Walter
September 9, 2009, 08:31 PM
clem / Those are part of a sub-caliber training kit for the U.S. M29 81mm Mortar. They use .22 blanks as the propellant charge.
The long tube is the sub-caliber bore and fits in the 81mm barrel/tube.

They were a lot of fun to set up and practice with.

Kind of like a .22 conversion kit for a 1911, only for an 81 mike mike. Hmmm...:scrutiny:

Walter

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