Is there such a thing as too early?


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DeadLiver
September 14, 2009, 06:13 PM
I have two daughters, one is 8 months old and the other turned 2 a few weeks ago. My older daughter usually watches me as I get dressed and go out. She sees me holstering my carry gun before I leave and has taken to pointing at it and saying "Daddy's gun, pretty!" Pretty being her adjective for just about everything that she likes. A couple of days ago, she did the same thing and then said "Daddy, hold it please?" I wasn't going anywhere important, and decided to indulge her curiosity.

I unloaded the gun explaining to her what I was doing and why, then let her touch and hold it with my "help". As we were holding the gun I told her about how to keep the gun pointed in a safe direction, not allowing her to look down the bore. She was intrigued with all the moving parts, and was very happy to try to manipulate the safety and hammer. She giggled when I showed her how the slide moves, and where the (empty) magazine goes. I locked the slide back and let her look in the chamber, even sticking her fingers in the mag well and chamber. I think we spent 10 minutes or so until she started to get bored, but by the time we were done she knew to keep her finger out of the trigger guard and could point out and name the sights, safety, and hammer.

Afterward I did have to wipe down the gun to get all the fingerprints off and ended up getting home later than I wanted to, but I felt it was a rewarding experience, giving my little girl her first lesson about guns. My wife even got a good picture of it. Now I'm REALLY excited to be able to go out and buy that little pink cricket rifle for her in a couple more years.

http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm167/DeadLiver2004/P9120658.jpg

I think I was 12 before I got my first lessons in firearm safety, but guns were never an interest for my parents. How old were your kids/you when the first lessons were given?

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jakemccoy
September 14, 2009, 06:34 PM
It depends on the kid. You seem like a methodical man with calm children.

I have a nephew who is about to turn 13. I'm just now ready to bring him to the range with me. I wasn't involved with his daily upbringing. As the uncle, I couldn't allow my nephew anywhere near my guns before now. I couldn't control his everyday environment and had no control over shaping his demeanor. When he was younger, he was borderline oppositional defiant.

I also have a niece (same parents) who is definitely not ready at the age of 9. Her misbehavior and immaturity won't allow me to feel comfortable with showing her my guns. She does silly things just to get attention. We can't have such misbehavior when there are guns around!

stchman
September 14, 2009, 06:37 PM
It is important that we teach our children about firearms. We should teach them not to blindly fear guns but to understand them.

I bought my first bun when I was about 19. My older brother was into gund and I shot them a couple of times.

gunlaw
September 14, 2009, 06:39 PM
As early as possible,but that will vary from kid to kid. Short lessons are best. Also you already taught her the most important lesson.Always wipe off the fingerprints.(just kidding rb).

AK103K
September 14, 2009, 06:46 PM
Your on the right track. :)

Our boys each had a Chipmunk rifle the day they were born, and were constantly with them from the point they could hold one on. The earlier you start, the better off you are. They both fired their first "live" rounds at 4. They had fired thousands in dry fire on the floor with me up to that point.

Constant exposure, and explanations are the key. Always take time and allow them to handle what what ever they want when they ask (within reason of course). They learn guns like they do anything else. Your the programmer, so its not their fault if the come out wrong. :)

Larry Ashcraft
September 14, 2009, 06:46 PM
Pax has some good info on her website about kids and guns: www.corneredcat.com

It wholly depends on the kid. Our own kids practically grew up on a handgun silhouette range, wearing earmuffs and playing in the sand. When my son turned eight, I gave him a Chipmunk rifle. All he required was a quick refresher course on safety.

We started our grandkids at around age six, with BB guns and one at a time. The ones who have the interest are doing well.

OTOH, I've been around fourteen year olds who I wouldn't take to a range.

BTW, cute little girl. :)

Grandpa Larry

chris in va
September 14, 2009, 06:59 PM
No offense, but I think you should take that picture off a public forum. It could be used against you at a later date.

NinjaFeint
September 14, 2009, 07:05 PM
^^^^^^^^^^

This or will show up on a bunch of anti-gun websites displayed in a negative light

longdayjake
September 14, 2009, 07:20 PM
This or will show up on a bunch of anti-gun websites displayed in a negative light

No offense, but I think you should take that picture off a public forum. It could be used against you at a later date.

If you are afraid of your beliefs and your rights then by all means take that picture off the internet!!!!

I personally am proud to be a constitution loving American as well as proud to be a gun owning father. If you refrain from doing soemthing EVERYTIME others/the governemnt might say or do something then you should probably go put on your tinfoil hat and curl up in a fetal position in your basement. Keep your guns away from boats as they tend to make them sink.

Here is a picture of my kid when he was a lot younger than he is now and I don't care what anyone says or does with this picture. I don't plan on ever shooting my son or allowing him to shoot anyone either. I could care less what the anti crowd does as their opinions are completely worthless.

http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee232/longdayjake/random288.jpg

DeadLiver
September 14, 2009, 07:32 PM
Isn't it illegal to print/use pictures of children without the parent's consent? Either way, there's nothing illegal/improper in the photo. It's not like she's holding it herself, with a finger in on the trigger pointing it at me.

We'll have to see how her temperament is in a couple of years, and hopefully I can take her to the range. We can't have any more kids, so I may end up with a pair of tomboys.

I can't say that I'm methodical, except when dealing with firearms and other items that demand proper respect. My daughter however is pretty calm for a 2 year old, especially that night. She was almost in awe as she got to prod and probe daddy's pretty gun, the kind of wide eyed wonderment we all seem to lose as we get older.

Larry, thank you for the reference to that site. I've read most of it and completely agree with her about dispelling curiosity and instilling proper respect. I just hope that I can do it well, with some help from THR on the way!

Also, thanks for the compliments for my daughter....Fortunately both of them took after their mother, who's a beautiful and tolerant woman.

jakemccoy
September 14, 2009, 07:35 PM
Someone somewhere will always have a problem with anything you say or do. You can either hide out in a cave or live your life.

geronimo509
September 14, 2009, 07:39 PM
Deadliver, I had the same experience with my son when he was two. He watches me dress and put my gun on. He would comment like your daughter and one day asked the same thing yours did. So i let him do the same thing that you did with your daughter. He knows the most important stuff too. And to never touch them when I wasnt there.

I agree, remove the picture just for (insert tinfoil hat comment)

I was reluctant to tell this forum my story, but GREAT JOB.

kdstrick
September 14, 2009, 08:20 PM
Kids are very curious. Even more curious when parents make something a mystery to them... or even worse, FORBID it! :what:

Since my daughter was very little she has been around guns. I'm a hunter and have had a CHL for a long time. It is irresponsible to have guns around kids and NOT teach them about them. Explain how they work and teach them gun safety. Our deal has always been that she can handle one anytime she would like... just ask me and we will do it together.

By removing the mystery and satisfying their curiosity, the firearm really becomes less fascinating to them.

One other thing I do with first time shooters, no matter the age.

Fill up a 1 gallon milk jug with water and shoot it in front of them. It is a dramatic event that demonstrates the power of the firearm and helps them to respect that power better than a hole in paper or a can.

Teach kids to respect guns... not fear them. :)

Larry Ashcraft
September 14, 2009, 08:37 PM
No offense, but I think you should take that picture off a public forum. It could be used against you at a later date.
One of my granddaughters:

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=74504&d=1205282349

:neener:

nbkky71
September 14, 2009, 08:50 PM
My son is 2 years old and while my wife and I don't let him handle any of my guns, we are reinforcing that they are not toys. He'll often be in the garage with with me when the safe is open and he knows that "those are daddy's...no touch".

Just keep things relevant and put them in terms a child can understand and you're on the right track!

ccsniper
September 14, 2009, 08:57 PM
my nephew is two almost three (January) I have guns all over the house that are out of his reach, but he can see them quite well. He already knows "I can't touch" while pointing at my guns. He also knows "thats a big gun!" when he looks at them. I seriously love my nephew and therefore he won't even touch them till I know he is ready, and I will not leave any around that he can reach or any ammo in them/near them while he is over.

Impureclient
September 14, 2009, 09:03 PM
If they are taught safety at that young, by 6 they will be teaching other adults about gun safety. I think it's a good idea especially if a little one gets a hold of one.
At least they are more likely not to cause an accident being informed properly as the OP is doing. They may just bring it to an adult and point out that it wasn't
properly stored to the adults dismay. Or by the time they are old enough to know where it is and how to use it, they won't mess with it because they respect it.

To the OP: She is in good hands. She's lucky to have a father like yourself just as you are blessed to have her. Also even if posting the pictures publicly may
not sit right with you after what some have posted, still get these good ones. She'll really appreciate it later. My son loves looking at pictures when he was younger.
Especially when they are cool like the one you posted.

1911swacp
September 14, 2009, 09:35 PM
DeadLiver,

I was raised around firearms all my life. When I was about 2 or 3 I was at a gun range with my father. He was shooting some kind of rifle with a hammer, while he was shooting it my curiosity of the hammer got to me. I stuck my finger between the hammer and firing pin about the time he pulled the trigger and was asking what it did. I found out the hard way what that hammer did! Smashed my little finger up pretty good. My father felt so bad that it had happened to me. It was not his fault but mine. Any ways, I first owned my first rifle at the age of 4. It was a Rosi pump .22, my father cut the stock down so it fitted me, and used a torch to burn tiger stripes on the forearm and stock and installed a Lyman peep sight on it for me. I could shoot it any time I wanted while my dad was home. I shot thousands of rounds out of that .22. I ended up loosing it when some one stole, it while it was over at a friends house when I was 16. Man was I pissed and up set and sick. My father died when I was 12. I could hit any thing with it I pointed at, even with that short stock on it. By the age I was 16 I was 6'3".

Thanks for showing your daughter pic and story with it. It brought back many good memories of my father and us shooting. I believe it is really never to young to teach our young'ins about firearms, and we know when to teach them more about them too as they grow older. My youngest daughter is 13 and owns her own Citadel 1911 .45acp and a STI .22 conversion to use on it.

Thanks,

1911swacp
Adam

distra
September 14, 2009, 11:46 PM
You did good! :D Brings a tear to my eye...;) My boys are 4yrs, 15months and number 3 due in December. The oldest has seen and touched my guns with supervision. He has his own Nerf guns and exhibits great care in where and when he can shoot them. He knows the safe direction and when I test or try to fix a jamb for him, he tells me to make sure I point it out the back into the woods! :D It makes me very proud! He has even fired my pellet rifle from a bench rest of course. He loves lining up the sights and hitting the bucket! My youngest has been saying "Pow Pow" for about 4 months now. They spend at least one hour a weak at the skeet house at our club while dad shoots and mom watches (at least until January then she'll get back to shooting skeet). :D You can not teach them safety too young. We've made it very clear to the oldest when and where he can shoot his Nerf gun and why it is important that all guns, be it a toy or not, be treated as if they were real. Kids don't know the difference and keeping it simple ie the same rules for both, reduces confusion and could save thier life one day.

conw
September 14, 2009, 11:56 PM
Just a tip. There are people who kind of prowl message boards and Google image search for images like this to ridicule and make fun of, and use for fodder for comedy of various types. If you're fine with that, and it doesn't get under your skin, fine by me. I don't think it's a big deal. OTOH your kid's pic could be on the internet with a "humorous" caption for years.

Example:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_ELxxkpPUrXk/SjzdIw3WeVI/AAAAAAAABlQ/ABkgJCenBCQ/s400/funny-condom-de-motivational-posters-kids-baby+06.jpg

NinjaFeint
September 15, 2009, 12:19 AM
If you are afraid of your beliefs and your rights then by all means take that picture off the internet!!!!

I personally am proud to be a constitution loving American as well as proud to be a gun owning father. If you refrain from doing soemthing EVERYTIME others/the governemnt might say or do something then you should probably go put on your tinfoil hat and curl up in a fetal position in your basement. Keep your guns away from boats as they tend to make them sink.

Here is a picture of my kid when he was a lot younger than he is now and I don't care what anyone says or does with this picture. I don't plan on ever shooting my son or allowing him to shoot anyone either. I could care less what the anti crowd does as their opinions are completely worthless.

http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee232/longdayjake/random288.jpg
Not afraid, sir. A remark about how others could use something against a cause is not fear. I guess I will never be a constitution loving American like you. How will I ever live?

Lovesbeer99
September 15, 2009, 12:26 AM
I shoot a Nerf gun in the house with my 5 year old daughter at empty soda cans. I've reviewed all the safety rules and she learned most of them quickly. She still likes to pick up the gun with her finger on the trigger, but... We've been doing this for about a year and a half and I've been impressed with her overall.

She knows not to point a gun at anyone. She also knows never to walk in front of a gun. Sometimes I'll be in the living room just shooting the nerf gun at the wall and she'll walk into the door way and wait for me to finish. If she is in a rush, she'll ask me to point the gun away so that she can get by and always double checks that I'm not pointing it at her.

I think with proper supervision you can start them young, but only if they seam interested. I wouldn't force it on her.

DeadLiver
September 15, 2009, 12:50 AM
Nice to see I'm among like minded friends here, by and large. Since becoming aware of gun safety and gaining a healthy respect for things I've been disturbed by the "toy" guns and how it's okay to shoot your friends with the nerf gun or the airsoft gun, but that different rules apply to "real" guns. I like enforcing the same rules even on the nerf gun, because I feel that children need consistency, especially on such important matters.

I recently had a firm discussion with some young men of about 14 years in the neighborhood who were having an airsoft war in the park, they would occasionally miss each other and a bb would hit in the playground where my girls and I were playing. Since then my wife and I have come to same conclusion I've already mentioned, that so called toy guns will be subject to the 4 rules just like the "real" ones. Thanks again for the words of encouragement everybody, I've been on medical leave after a surgery for 2 months now and it's nice to feel that I'm doing something right.

Conwict, thanks for the well worded warning...I'll take my chances.

conw
September 15, 2009, 12:55 AM
On the other hand, I think it's great to expose your kids to guns. In fact, I'd even suggest making the kid bored of guns if possible. Don't let it be a novelty...

flrfh213
September 15, 2009, 12:58 AM
i have a basket like that but not the rifle.... can i get one from somone if i sit in my basket????... cute pics and if tought correctly it is never too young. my 9 year old has his 22 rifle, it is all his (and it lives in my safe) but he has no access to it with out myself or my wife...

conw
September 15, 2009, 12:58 AM
Also, I was 7-8 when I got the hands-on demo. I knew safety basics before then.

jakemccoy
September 15, 2009, 01:30 AM
I've been on medical leave after a surgery for 2 months now and it's nice to feel that I'm doing something right.


I recently recovered from a removal of a dead large intestine. Never did I have such a healthy perspective on life than during my recovery. I don't have kids of my own, but I can understand how hugely proud you must be. Thank you for sharing the pics.

DeadLiver
September 15, 2009, 01:37 AM
I felt that way after my liver transplant 5 years ago at the ripe old age of 21...Cheating death does seem to have that effect on people.

SuperNaut
September 15, 2009, 03:06 AM
Never to young to start teaching kids, but if they cannot understand and follow the 4 rules - no touchy.

SN13
September 15, 2009, 10:34 AM
Larry, Hope you don't mind: :D:D:D

http://i567.photobucket.com/albums/ss116/SN13/ba_uu_r_2.jpg

conw
September 15, 2009, 01:53 PM
Hahaha!

#shooter
September 16, 2009, 06:14 AM
One thing to consider: does the range have an age level? My range has a no children under 5yrs rule. Of course safety and handling can be done earlier if the child is receptive. At that young of an age children love manipulating objects: buttons like the safety and mag release, triggers, hammer,slides, watching the cylinder roll, lights, lasers, etc. Followed by this is not a toy speech. I the end it really depends on the child.

danbrew
September 16, 2009, 09:17 AM
To the original poster, the only way to know for sure is to leave the gun on the kitchen table and leave your daughter in the kitchen while you go outside.

If the gun is exactly where you left it when you return, perhaps some of what you said has stuck. If not, well, shoot, she's two. Two year olds are curious. Probably best that you unload the gun first.

My two cents? Eight is the right age. My son is nine and we've been on bb guns for about a year now and are close to getting a .22 for him. My daughter is 11 and she's nowhere near ready to be around a real gun. They both know the rules and what they're supposed to do (Stop, Don't Touch, Leave the Room, Tell an Adult), and I'm fairly confident that my son would do all of that. There's no way my daughter would - she's a bit of a show off and would want to take charge of the situation and that, unfortunately, would include touching the gun. We're very safe in my house, but I worry about what would happen in a neighbor's house? Of course the job of the parent is to know where your kids are and who they are associating with, etc.

Free internet advice, worth what 'ya paid for it.

kludge
September 16, 2009, 09:37 AM
I start my kids (five of them) of the Eddie Eagle routine the instant they start wanting to see my gun.

Usually it 4-5 years old... this last one was 2 years old... his big brothers played with a toy nerf gun and rubber band gun.

We go through the rules, then I make sure they've chosen a safe direction, then we check the action, then I hand them the gun and stay with them to make sure they keep their finger off the trigger.

zombienerd
September 16, 2009, 10:12 AM
I think you're doing it exactly how it should be done :) It's the same way I have taught my first daughter (now 4), and will teach my second daughter (6 days old) when it comes time.

Guns shouldn't hold a mystique to children. Kids who aren't allowed to see something, touch something, understand something then see it as "forbidden fruit" and want to taste it more than ever.

My daughter knows that if she ever wants to hold or look at any of my guns, all she has to do is ask. I will put down whatever I'm doing and let her get her fill. This doesn't happen that often because she sees them on a daily basis, and the mystery is gone. They're just another item that she's not supposed to touch without asking.

I also shoot airsoft and BB Air rifles/pistols with my daughter, and have since she was 2. She loves it, and it has built good discipline. She always keeps the airguns pointed downrange, keeps the fingers off the trigger until she's ready to shoot, and knows that they aren't toys.

zombienerd
September 16, 2009, 10:16 AM
On a side note, the "leave a gun on the table" idea is quite good. I have done this myself. A few of my airsofts are perfect replicas of the gun they're intended to look like. I have left them in various spots, unloaded, to see her reaction, and to see if she'd touch it.

She's never failed the test. Always comes and gets mommy or daddy whenever she sees one where it's not supposed to be. She knows to do the same thing over at friends houses also.

conw
September 16, 2009, 08:24 PM
zombie, well said...that IS a great idea. I think I first heard it from SM (steve).

CplHOG
September 17, 2009, 11:04 PM
We have 3 children. 17,13 and 9. They all have turned out to be very level headed at 8 or so, the youngest was a little flighty so I did not start her shooting until this year.
One of the lessons I imparted to them was that you can not take a fired bullet back. It was taught to me at age ten, before I ever fired a round, by my neighbor,Jack, who taught me to shoot.
He placed an inflated balloon on a bail of straw and shot it. Then he told me to go fix it. I was dumbfounded and told him that it was impossible to fix the balloon. He crouched down beside me,and asked if he should take the bullet back, then I could fix the balloon. Being ten, I asked him how could he take the bullet back?
He replied"I can't, always remember, when you pull the trigger you can not undo what you have done."
I have taken all our children through that exercise. As I relate this story I realize that Jacks demonstration to me had profound effect on me. It taught me that you can not take any action you take back.

conw
September 18, 2009, 02:10 AM
Cool story Cpl, and welcome to the high road. Very good object lesson.

Neo-Luddite
September 18, 2009, 05:51 PM
It begins when they have enough language to understand and obey rule No.1:

"You may touch this only when I am holding it" (courtesy my Father-in-Law).

And it proceeds by degrees from there.

Never say 'no' to a request that encourages curiosity and familiarity---NEVER let guns be the 'forbidden' thing. To me, THAT road leads to horrible tragedy and no where else. Don't be swayed by the nonsense of those bleeting in the field about a child being too young---EXCEPT to note if *their* kid is over at YOUR HOUSE; he or she will be the ONE that wants to sneak-a-peak at 'THE GUNS'.

Sure, the weapons need to be secured from little hands and many big ones.

(BTW--our girls are 4 and 6--and the pink Crickets arrive for the 5th B-day @ my house----little miss 4-year-old's is waiting on her and we have begun familiarizing with it. As a side bar, I broke my own rule and decided that safety indoctrination was more of an issue than insisting on 'iron sights' discipline; the optic mount from Cricket and a cheapie red dot make plinking MUCH more fun and enticing. And Daddy cleans the weapons for now (lead *is* an issue, and cleaning IS NOT FUN).

damien
September 18, 2009, 07:13 PM
Child endangerment!!! :)

pck3
September 18, 2009, 09:47 PM
lots of good info here but one thing that really stood out was what KDSTRICK said. When my oldest son turned 4 I bought him his first BB gun and took him to the range. Before we even took his gun out we lined up a few cans of pumpkin pie filling and shot them with my .300 win mag ( pretty cool) and we talked about the what ifs, What if that was your brother or sister? With the most serious expression I'd ever seen on his face he said OHH NOOO. and ever since he has shown way more maturity than I ever expected. He still loves to shoot his BB gun or go squirrell hunting with me (he's 5 now ) so he hasn't been scarred for life he just learned that guns are not toys

ohioshooter
September 18, 2009, 10:56 PM
My oldest son is 4 years old and we've taken him shooting once with us and I held the gun (fn 5.7) and let him squeeze off 20 rounds and after about 10 rounds he kinda got bored but he definitely understood that guns go bang and they are loud. Now he really has no curosity as he sees me reload all the time and I let him in my gun room to help with either sorting the brass or putting the bullet in for seating. Do I think it's too early, no way. I think like some of you where if you take the curosity out of the equation and let them see what guns do to objects they have a better understanding of what guns really do thus making them less likely to play around with them.

doc2rn
September 18, 2009, 11:34 PM
Mine has been coming around slowly and I let her dry fire at the wall as she lines up the sights across my bed. If she learns trigger finger control (keep it off the bang switch) I will soon take her out she is now 7.

HexHead
September 18, 2009, 11:39 PM
On the other hand, I think it's great to expose your kids to guns. In fact, I'd even suggest making the kid bored of guns if possible. Don't let it be a novelty...
Make them clean them for you when you return from the range. ;)

conw
September 19, 2009, 01:15 PM
Exactly hexhead!

Dannix
September 19, 2009, 02:21 PM
That's a really cute photo DeadLiver. :)

Make them clean them for you when you return from the range.
You, sir, are brilliant!


I have some 3-5 y/o kids around, not my own. I figured I'd start with bb guns with them to help assuage any parental fears. Anyone here start with bb guns?

DeadLiver
September 22, 2009, 02:43 PM
Just an update. Since I first posted this, it's become almost a daily ritual. She comes up to me and says "Daddy, hold your gun please." I'm happy to oblige. We'll have to see about leaving it on the table in another year or two though. She's only two and I don't expect her to be able to pass that test right now. Aside from that, thanks again for all the encouraging words and good advice!

CCWB
September 22, 2009, 03:31 PM
Aw hell! My kid was just shy of 2 when she first shot a 22. At a few curious months old, she was playing with a cap gun, around a year she would shot the thing, over a year a BB gun. Going back, she was shooting with mom before we realized mom was with child. A kid is never too young if the parent is mature.

Start off small and by the time they're 10 or so, they may want to shoot often. Plus they're less likely to be mixed up in a firearm mishap because you've educated them about the 10 firearm commandments.

kmcintosh78
September 22, 2009, 04:48 PM
You did a great job. And I echo the fact of "Do not touch unless Daddy is there"!!
I was given a BB gun at age 4, and my first 22 at age 8. But before I got to use them, I went through a firearms safety course and the NRA hunters course.
I am a military vet and ex LE. I respect firearms, and know what they can and can't do, because I was introduced to them early and correctly.

Madcap_Magician
September 22, 2009, 11:33 PM
Never too young to have an honest discussion with your child about something that they're curious about.

GunFun
September 22, 2009, 11:44 PM
My Dad (ex Green Beret with 2 tours in Vietnam) started me shooting with a BB gun when I was 4 I think.

I wouldn't recommend anything more high-powered than a BB gun at first (for reasons mentioned above, and other weapons can be too heavy for a youngster to learn to aim correctly as well).

I agree with most of the posters in this thread that a bolt action .22 LR rifle would be a good starter firearm after the BB gun.

A single shot training weapon helps the student focus on improving accuracy and helps the instructor drill firearms safety in between shots in my opinion.

MarineOne
September 23, 2009, 01:32 AM
Remove the curiousity and teach safety, and you won't have any problems with kids and firearms.

I did this with both my boys, starting them off on BB guns and slowly moved them into rimfire and centerfire. They won't pick up any gun unless they ask if they can or are told to.



Kris

GunFun
September 23, 2009, 01:33 AM
This is obviously a thread where everyone agrees. :)

Good point about removing the curiosity though. The cases where kids have killed other kids were generally about hidden weapons and curiosity.

The kids that killed other kids (on accident) had no firearms education, for the most part. That's just a parent being irresponsible in my opinion. :)

If your child expresses interest in weapons (and of course they will), that's your cue to teach them respect, proper handling, and the value of life forms.

"You do not kill anything you are not going to eat, unless it's something that is trying to kill you!"

I think I just clarified that rule further, lol.

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