Is 7oz. of extra weight something I should consider when choosing a new carry gun?


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Joe Link
September 16, 2009, 12:55 AM
I'd really like to get a Dan Wesson CBOB for my everyday carry gun, but next in line is a Colt Lightweight Commander. The only thing I'm concerned with is the weight difference, with the CBOB being 34oz. and the Colt being 27oz. Hoping some of you can comment on how noticeable the extra 7oz. would be.

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PT1911
September 16, 2009, 12:59 AM
Go with what you carry and shoot best... the 7oz will make a huge difference or no difference at all depending on your own preferences.

9mmepiphany
September 16, 2009, 02:11 AM
it depends on how you carry and how many hours a day you'll be carrying...it's almost a half pound difference

early in my LE career i carried a Combat Commander with a steel frame. i retired it to off-duty carry (fewer hours) and finally replaced it with a LW Officer's ACP.

later in my career i carried a Sig alloy framed 220 as a duty gun and thought it was perfect (12+ hour shifts), but you have to remember that i had alot of weight on that duty belt...plus a bad back by then.

i use a stainless steel Sig220ST when teaching, but much less other weight on my belt.

i think a factor to consider would be how many hours you'll be carrying and how many of them will be on your feet (focuses weight on your hips).

if you decide to go with the steel gun, don't scrimp on the belt and holster...makes all the difference

bigfatdave
September 16, 2009, 03:50 AM
if you decide to go with the steel gun, don't scrimp on the belt and holster...makes all the difference That applies to the lightest polymer gun as well, really.
Joey Link, you're talking about nearly half a pound between these two, but what are you packing now? It might make a difference, or it might come to nothing, depending on the quality of your carry gear, number of reloads you're packing, and other miscellaneous EDC junk in your pockets.
For 7 ounces, all other factors being equal, I'd take the lighter gun. But other factors are never equal ... you may get faster follow-up shots with the heavier gun, or you may be able to comfortable carry a reload only with the lighter one, or one might just fit your hand better, or perhaps cost is an issue between the two.
Like all carry decisions, your opinion and commitment matter most.

WC145
September 16, 2009, 05:46 AM
You're going to carry it more han shoot it or anything else. A half pound doesn't sound like much, but you'll feel at the end of the day.

+1 on the belt and holster, buy good stuff, it can make all the difference in the world.

moooose102
September 16, 2009, 06:59 AM
while i can not comment on the holster (i have only had one which means either i did it right, or i just don't know any better), a GOOD BELT i can comment on. you absoloutly can not believe how much difference it will make! what a difference. i guess if any of us had a brain, just looking at all the weight a L.E.O. carries, and what thier duty belts are like, should tell the story. to bad it took me so long to figure that out. anyway, if a L.E.O. tells you about how to make your life more comfortable while ccw'ing. LISTEN AND PAY ATTENTION!
thanks you for your advice and your service 9mmepifiny

kanook
September 16, 2009, 07:06 AM
If you want to know the difference for yourself before you purchase, carry something that is 27oz on your belt or in a fannypack for a couple of days. Then carry something that is 34oz for the same length of time and you will know for firsthand which is better for you.

Joe Link
September 16, 2009, 10:38 AM
Thanks for the tips guys. I wear a Milt Sparks belt and plan to invest in either a VMII like I have for my Glock 19 (which I currently carry) and my 5" 1911 (which I carried before I sold). Both of those guns are comfortable enough weight-wise :)

easyg
September 16, 2009, 11:16 AM
If you want to know the difference for yourself before you purchase, carry something that is 27oz on your belt or in a fannypack for a couple of days. Then carry something that is 34oz for the same length of time and you will know for firsthand which is better for you.
Excellent advice!

Ske1etor
September 16, 2009, 12:19 PM
My cellphone and wallet together weigh just over 7 oz.......

I carry a CBOB daily in an MTAC and have not had a problem.

MCgunner
September 16, 2009, 12:26 PM
I've settled on pocket carry. I know, for me, weight matters. If it's too uncomfortable, I won't have it on me 24/7. That is not an option I consider wise. Now days, powerful guns are built in tiny packages. But, then, I'm not a 1911 fanatic, in fact, cannot stand 1911s, been there, done that. Up to you, but I'd go with the lighter gun, myself. Won't do you ANY good if you don't have it with you when you need it. I carry my PDW from the time I get up in the morning until I take my pants off at night and go to bed.

rcmodel
September 16, 2009, 02:48 PM
You might want to add in the weight of the ammo too!

7-8 rounds of .45 ACP ammo will bring the 27oz empty weight of the Commander to the 34oz of the CBOB.
And the empty weight of the CBOB to 40 oz or so.

Now, you're talking heavy!

rc

9mmepiphany
September 16, 2009, 04:04 PM
thanks you for your advice and your service 9mmepifiny

thanks, just trying to share some lessons i've learned through experience and teaching

too bad i haven't figured out how to avoid a drawer full of holsters yet :D

dairycreek
September 16, 2009, 04:12 PM
I use two 1911's for concealed carry. One is a Dan Wesson CBOB at 34 ounces empty and the other is a S & W 1911Sc weighing in at around 26 ounces empty. Both are Commanders and so my situation is like that posed by the OP. Honestly, the weight difference is not that noticeable to me as long as I have a good belt. Both of my concealed carry gun belts are extra stiff and do an excellent job of distributing the weight of my carry gun and the one mag that I carry on my off hand side. I have carried both of these gun at times using a less than quality belt and, quite frankly, that turns out with both guns being a pain in the - - -!

As long as I have my good carry belt on I tend to carry the heavier CBOB almost all the time now. The extra weight is just not that noticeable to me and I prefer the CBOB as a shooter. FWIW!:D

fastbolt
September 16, 2009, 06:10 PM
A handgun is a compromise all the way around, including method of carry and balancing overall weight against both carry comfort and how well it handles for the person shooting it.

Yep, most folks can feel the difference carrying half a pound, more or less, hanging from their hip by the end of a long day.

Then again, there always seems to be those folks who claim they don't notice a difference between carrying a pistol with a steel, alloy or plastic frame. That's fine for them. I certainly can, though, and that's regardless of the type of good quality holster I may use. (I also have more than a couple of boxes of holsters collected over the years.)

Then again, I also spent many years carrying full-size weapons on & off-duty, both IWB and OWB. I appreciated being able to carry lighter and smaller weapons as time passed. I also realized that I had to improve my skills and abilities when shooting some of the lighter and/or smaller guns. No surprise.

Something else to consider is that some folks can feel a difference when shooting the different weight models, and not just carrying them around. Some folks claim it's enough of a difference to affect how well they can shoot the different weight guns. That's worth some consideration.

Carrying the one which allows someone to best shoot it safely, accurately and effectively, especially in stressful and difficult circumstances, is going to be a judgment call for each individual.

I know one guy who was really eager to get a compact alloy .45 issued to him so he didn't have to carry the full-size .45 under his sport coat. I recommended he try one out at the range first. Really try it out, running through some different drills with it, and not just standing on the firing line and slowly shoot it. He finally did. His shooting skills were such that he was not able to shoot the compact alloy gun nearly as well as the larger & heavier full-size all-steel gun. He finally decided that his skills and abilities with the different guns took precedence compared to comfort issues.

A heavier pistol is often going to be considered to be 'easier' to shoot when it comes to controllability and recoil management, but that may not mean a lighter one isn't going to work very well for the individual who is skilled in using it. One person may not be able to shoot an alloy-framed pistol as well as a steel-framed version, but another person may be able to shoot either well enough to make it less of a consideration, for them, and their focus may be more on the comfort realized when carrying it for long periods of time.

At one point I went from carrying a full-size all-steel .45 in my plainclothes assignment to carrying a compact alloy .45 pistol. Why? Same reason I went to carrying lighter weight guns off-duty as I spent more time in LE. Lighter on the hip over the course of a 10-16 hour day. Simple.

I bought a lightweight Commander once upon a time (before I entered LE). I did something silly and traded it off for a steel Commander because of misplaced concern over the durability of the alloy frame. When I entered LE and started carrying that steel Commander around, I quickly regretted having traded off the lightweight gun. ;)

I bought a SW1911SC (Scandium aluminum alloy frame) several years ago to replace that older lightweight Commander. It's a 5" model, granted, but I felt that if I were going to decide to carry a 1911 more often in the future, I'd probably be more inclined to carry a lightweight 5" gun than an all-steel 5" gun. ;)

MICHAEL T
September 19, 2009, 12:48 AM
like others I have a LTW Colt Commander and a Dan Wesson CBOB With good belt and a UBG holster I really don't notice the difference Weight is a Personal thing I carry a steel frame J frame in pocket and think its fine Now when shooting I notice the difference DW wins their

Avenger29
September 19, 2009, 01:36 AM
I carry a Ruger Security Six that weighs in at about 33 oz (I believe that's an empty weight). A good belt and a good holster does help a lot, but I definitely notice that weight and it's doing all it can to pull down my pants no matter how tight the belt is. Bulk affects me more than anything (particularly when sitting down).

That said, that weight is really comforting late at night in the dark parking lot. I know I'm carrying a handgun chambered in a very effective caliber that I can get hits with quickly. The recoil is not painful, and the gun fits my hand very well.

I'm trying to find a happy medium between weight, size, and shootability. I'll let ya'll know when I find my Excalibur. The Security Six is close but not quite it.

Gunfighter123
September 19, 2009, 11:28 AM
Something else to consider is that some folks can feel a difference when shooting the different weight models, and not just carrying them around. Some folks claim it's enough of a difference to affect how well they can shoot the different weight guns. That's worth some consideration.

Carrying the one which allows someone to best shoot it safely, accurately and effectively, especially in stressful and difficult circumstances, is going to be a judgment call for each individual.

I know one guy who was really eager to get a compact alloy .45 issued to him so he didn't have to carry the full-size .45 under his sport coat. I recommended he try one out at the range first. Really try it out, running through some different drills with it, and not just standing on the firing line and slowly shoot it. He finally did. His shooting skills were such that he was not able to shoot the compact alloy gun nearly as well as the larger & heavier full-size all-steel gun. He finally decided that his skills and abilities with the different guns took precedence compared to comfort issues.

A heavier pistol is often going to be considered to be 'easier' to shoot when it comes to controllability and recoil management, but that may not mean a lighter one isn't going to work very well for the individual who is skilled in using it. One person may not be able to shoot an alloy-framed pistol as well as a steel-framed version, but another person may be able to shoot either well enough to make it less of a consideration, for them, and their focus may be more on the comfort realized when carrying it for long periods of time.

I think the above is the best thing posted !!! YES -- if the gun is very heavy , it will not be carried ----- YES , if the gun is very light , it may not be shot well when needed.

At times , I've CCW a NAA .22 and most other times , a ParaOrdnance 7.45 LDA ---- IF I THINK that there is the slightest chance I may be forced to shoot --- the Hell with the weight --- I will pick the 7.45 every time.

dom1104
September 19, 2009, 11:53 AM
if you are going to carry a 1911, its going to be heavy.


my carry gun is 24 oz, loaded with 15 rounds its 33 oz.

I think its about as heavy as I will ever go.

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