Any Ideas What This Actually Is? Lot's of Pic's


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Salty1
September 16, 2009, 09:59 PM
My Dad received this from an old uncle of his who lived in Nova Scotia. I believe that it is a pirate boarding gun, after lots of research I am no further ahead than when I started. The axe and spike appear to be brass, it has lot's of silver inlay that is in good shape for the age of it. I figured that some forum members may have seen one of these and could provide some opinions and direction as to how to research it further. He would like to sell it, I would like to have it at a fair value so any ideas on worth would also be appreciated.

http://i364.photobucket.com/albums/oo90/Salty1_photos/Firearms035.jpg

http://i364.photobucket.com/albums/oo90/Salty1_photos/Firearms036.jpg

http://i364.photobucket.com/albums/oo90/Salty1_photos/Firearms038.jpg

http://i364.photobucket.com/albums/oo90/Salty1_photos/Firearms039.jpg

http://i364.photobucket.com/albums/oo90/Salty1_photos/Firearms041.jpg

http://i364.photobucket.com/albums/oo90/Salty1_photos/Firearms006.jpg

http://i364.photobucket.com/albums/oo90/Salty1_photos/Firearms010.jpg

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Birdmang
September 16, 2009, 10:00 PM
Reproduction axe flintlock?

mljdeckard
September 16, 2009, 10:05 PM
Something for when you are having a VERY bad day.

essayons21
September 16, 2009, 10:06 PM
Not sure if its a repro or not, but it may be a boarding pistol. Used in naval service, boarding pistols were often identified by a birds-head grip with studs, etc. on the butt of the pistol grip so that the pistol could be used as a club in hand-to-hand combat. The blade is reminiscent of a boarding axe, used for cutting rigging and shipboard combat.

Its hard to tell from the blurry photos, but the inscriptions on the blade appear to be arabic.

If it is real, the construction would indicate 18th century. I'll try to check some references over the weekend and see if I can find anything similar.

hogshead
September 16, 2009, 10:10 PM
Wonder How the atf would classify that. Bet you cant own it in Cali.lol

armoredman
September 16, 2009, 10:20 PM
How do you fire it? The axe blade is right where the hand would go...

justashooter in pa
September 16, 2009, 11:18 PM
fired by clutching the blade between the arm and chest with thumb on side of blade and finger on trigger, and holding the forward end of gun in left hand. no sights, and not really intended to be aimed. just kinda pointed in the general direction for effect. prolly best loaded with shot. round for christians, and square for wogs.

chuckusaret
September 16, 2009, 11:39 PM
Appears the thing is held together with bolts/screws. I don't believe they had slotted head bolts/screws in those days, did they? I guess they did. According to my son they have had the slotted head screw since the 16th century.

Neat looking weapon.

Bruno2
September 16, 2009, 11:44 PM
Have you shot it yet ? :what:

Dr.Rob
September 16, 2009, 11:50 PM
Hard to tell if it's real or a non-gun made in N. Africa for the tourists. It's missing parts and it has a lot of rust. The inlays and sideplates are pretty rudamentary compared to the axe head, which suggests to me they were not originally built together.

Doesn't mean its not real and old. You'd need a real appraiser for that.

Magwa
September 17, 2009, 12:20 PM
Where's Antiques Road Show when you need it?

DMK
September 17, 2009, 06:26 PM
The inlays and sideplates are pretty rudamentary compared to the axe head, which suggests to me they were not originally built together.That right side plate looks extremely crude compared to the rest of the gun. So much so, my first thought was that it was a field repair,

JellyJar
September 17, 2009, 09:28 PM
To me it appears to be a recently made "antique" not quite real firearm made in North Africa ( most likely Morocco ) for the tourist trade. Probably only a few years old.

Hang it on your wall and make up stories about it for your guests :D


P.S.

Don't ever try to shoot it!!!:eek:

Salty1
September 17, 2009, 10:16 PM
I can say that it is not recently made, the uncle told my Dad that he has had it for over 50 years, he was in his upper 90's when he passed and my Dad got it about 20 years ago. I will try to locate somebody who can physically look at it and try to date it. The silver inlay is real, that has been tested. Thanks for the input......

doc2rn
September 18, 2009, 12:39 AM
I think I have seen the image on the blade b4. I think it is spanish in origin. The flintlock however is more crude and has seen better days. I wouldn't doubt it was probably made for pirating in some place like Jamaica or one of the other famous pirating hangouts. Dont forget these where still in operation up through the civil war.

Oyeboten
September 18, 2009, 03:46 AM
The Screw Heads are 'modern'...


It has some contradictions going on...


The Brass Castings of the non-lock side Side Plate, and, Trigger and Trigger Guard are very rudely finished and set/inlain.

Possibly, for Morrocan 'Pirates'...Lol...or, made for 1940s-1950s era Tourists...


The Iron Work looks very crude also...though, m-a-y-b-e, the Arm was functional...and later in it's life, had various Screws replaced with newer ones...hard to guess from here...

danprkr
September 18, 2009, 03:19 PM
No idea, but I am intrigued. I'll track this thread for sure.

essayons21
September 18, 2009, 03:34 PM
could you get any sharper pictures of the blade?

ants
September 18, 2009, 06:26 PM
"Aaarrgh! I be pleased, matey, if ye mind yer muzzle control awhilst yer swingin that axe!"

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