Beretta 92


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KJS
September 20, 2009, 11:35 PM
Any opinions on this gun? I'm sure you guys must have some given how common it is.

What do you think of it relative to the Taurus 92?

I've never fired any semi-auto other than a Ruger .22, so semi-autos are totally new to me.

Thus far the only centerfire guns I've used have been revolvers (.357/.38), which attract me for their simplicity. Basically, a trained monkey could load & fire a double action revolver and to be honest semi-autos intimidate me. Though criminal thugs seem to figure out pistols just fine, so I assume I could too given that I'm pretty sure I'm smarter than violent criminals.

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j-easy
September 20, 2009, 11:38 PM
I like them, never had any problems with one. It is pretty easy to use

IdahoLT1
September 21, 2009, 02:08 AM
not to sound like an as* but search functions are your friend. The Beretta 92, CZ75, SIG 226 and Glock 17 are some of the most talked about pistols on this forum.

That said, mine has been completely 100% reliable in 2500 rounds. I even bought it used. I prefer the fit and finish of the Beretta over the Taurus, and the company is alot easier to deal with than Taurus if warranty issues come into play.

m2steven
September 21, 2009, 02:46 AM
I'm mechanically incompetent. 5 years ago the thought of taking apart a semi-auto pistol and actually getting it back together scared me. Now, i don't give it a second thought. You can get confused if you get a pistol with a safety which acts as a decocker. Also, some pistols won't fire without a magazine in it. Just read the manual.

Many of the pistols you see don't have safeties. You put the loaded magazine in the gun, rack the slide and you're ready to fire - until you're out of cartridges. That's the way they all work with a loaded magazine and the safety off.

Now, the beretta 92 is one of the finest pistols ever made. Not only that, it's exceptionally beautiful and well balanced. It's simply wonderful to shoot. You may or may not be able to tell the difference between a genuine Beretta and the Taurus 92. There isn't much, and there is no basic quality difference at this point and hasn't been.
I have 2 other Taurus designed tauruses and they are a different story. Both had to go back for repairs.

Anyway, if you like the Beretta - its a fantastic pistol that you will probably love to shoot and keep a lifetime. Same with the Taurus version. These guns are so nice they almost shoot themselves!

You hear a lot of people raving about Glock and Sig and 1911's and so forth. The raving about the 1911's is actually on the money. You won't kiss your Glock unless it saves your life, but you might kiss a Sig 230 or your Beretta just because they're so sexy AND can save your life. Get a gun you'll want to take out and fondle and stare at when you're not able to shoot it. You'll be happy you did.

nwilliams
September 21, 2009, 03:07 AM
I love the Beretta 92!

Years ago I owned the Taurus clone in .40, I then traded it in for a 92f which I later sold for some stupid reason. The Beretta was a much nicer quality than the Taurus and I was happy I made the trade.

The 92's are big and heavy, not ideal for concealed carry, they don't have great triggers and a lot of people find the grips too large. However they are very accurate, they're incredibly reliable, very low recoil, very easy to maintain, rugged, attractive, they have a great fit and finish, the slide feels like it's on rollers and the trigger is a breeze to improve.

The Taurus 92 clone is a decent gun but for a little extra money why not just go with the original and buy a Beretta. New ones can be expensive but they are very easy to find used for a decent price, I recently bought a used 92fs from my local gun shop for $350 and it's in great shape. Not to sound like a snob but I'd sooner buy a used Beretta 92 than a new Taurus clone.

I've been craving another 92 for a while now and having one again makes my collection feel a little more complete. It's just my opinion here but I think any serious handgun collection should have at least one Beretta 92 in it.


Here's mine....
http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/bb264/nwilliams27/Beretta1.jpg

Ragnar Danneskjold
September 21, 2009, 03:15 AM
Honestly, they are too big for my hands. I only use one when I have to.

rogertc1
September 21, 2009, 07:15 AM
My Taurus 917CS

Shipwreck
September 21, 2009, 08:08 AM
Taurus quality is horrible in my opinion. Yes, there are Taurus fans out there, and some may come post on this thread to disagree with me. But the fitting of their guns are quite often terrible. Parts break easily quite often, and their customer service is horrendous.

If you want a 1911, look at a different brand.

As for the Beretta 92 - it is a fantastic gun. I use one as my concealed carry/

EOC_Jason
September 21, 2009, 01:23 PM
I am not a Taurus person either, but will not go into that discussion. That is just my preference.

I own several 92FS's and love them. They are very reliable (never had a single jam), very easy to take apart & clean, plenty accurate, and reasonably priced (if you shop around).

One of my friends whom is not very mechanically inclined has started going to the range with me. One day I tell him he is going to help me clean the pistols that he shoots. I show him how to take apart the Beretta and put it back together a couple times, and literally within minutes he was able to do it almost with his eyes closed. They are *very* simple to field strip and clean. However even if you aren't the best on maintenance they will still function very reliably while horribly dirty.

What is your intention for this firearm? For self-defense or for target shooting? Like you said a revolver is the epitome of simplicity. You know if it's loaded because you can physically see the rounds in the cylinder. If it's an older model it probably doesn't have a safety (my preference) so it is just point and pull the trigger. No additional thought required on if there is a round in the chamber or if the safety is off. The only down side... 5 or 6 shots and you are out of quarters.

earlthegoat2
September 21, 2009, 01:37 PM
The thing the Taurus has going for it is the safety location. There are some afficianodos out there and I even believe them to be an excellent value. Other than that I will put my money with the Beretta. I like this gun a lot even when I was in the military and everyone like to gripe about it there. Magazines are plentiful and cheap. Especially the milsurp mags. Accuracy is good and recoil is minute.

zhyla
September 21, 2009, 02:14 PM
I've got the Taurus version (PT-92AF). I got it well used but I've put probably 1500 rounds thru it with not problem. I've had no issues with it at all other than the nickel finish not holding perfectly up in my humid coastal climate (blued is a better choice). I think the Beretta and Taurus versions are basically equivalent. The grip safety is more convenient though.

I would go rent one and see how you like it. You may find it is too big for your hands. It really is an enormous gun.

KJS
September 21, 2009, 06:34 PM
^Renting one to see how I like it was exactly what I was planning to do.

I was just curious what others thought of it first. No gloves smaller than XL are going to fit me, so I don't expect the grip could be too large for my hands, but I'll certainly find out the answer when I rent it.

As for the earlier reply about how I should use the search function, sorry about that. You're right I should have and I will to find more conversations about this model. Though I guess the fact that this model gets some of the most posts of any on this forum would tend to suggest it can't be bad.

KJS
September 21, 2009, 06:39 PM
And I live in Wisconsin, so big & heavy and not ideal for concealed carry doesn't matter in one of the two states that doesn't allow concealed carry.

While I strongly support concealed carry rights, I personally doubt I'll ever feel like packing a pistol on my person. I think everyone should have the right to do so if they wish, but I don't think it's for me even if WI law finally does change.

possum
September 21, 2009, 07:06 PM
they are reliable, and accurate enough. my issues with them are several though.
1) they seem to be snappier than a 9mm handgun should be especially for as much as they weigh.
2) they are almost too big for my hands
3) they are da/sa and i am just not a fan

however i better get to like them as i just found out that i am gonna be issued one this comming deployment.

sigbear
September 21, 2009, 07:53 PM
I bought a new Beretta 92FS about 5 years ago, kept it for 2 years.
My Beretta never had a FTF of any kind in 5000 rounds, was one of the nicest looking guns I ever had, however, I traded it for a Sig 226 9mm only because the sig is far more accurate for me ( don't know if the accuracy is me or the guns).

Sigbear

EOD Guy in VA
September 21, 2009, 08:25 PM
I've had mine for 11 years. It has been extremely reliable and accurate.

EdLaver
September 22, 2009, 02:16 PM
The Beretta 92fs is the 1911 of 9mm's in my opinion...

All steel
very popular
reliable and dependable
was/is a military issued weapon
5" barrel with great accuracy

Morgo
October 1, 2009, 07:43 AM
I like Beretta's, mine have been very reliable.

http://i392.photobucket.com/albums/pp4/brycemorgan452/P1030005.jpg
http://i392.photobucket.com/albums/pp4/brycemorgan452/P1030012-1.jpg

I would never buy a Taurus if given the choice of a Beretta.
As far as operation they are very much the same as the ruger .22 semi auto's just more kick :)

johnnylaw53
October 1, 2009, 08:01 AM
The Beretta 92's are great pistols and I think they make a very good choice for anyone who is looking for thier first semi they are big but I have never found them too big and i carried one when I was working undercover narcotics not daily but when providing close cover you do have to dress around them which is something I don't like doing on a daily basic. They are very easy to field strip which I think is a very important thing if a weapon too hard to take apart a lots of people will not clean it as much as it should be done. We went to the sig pro many years ago and our range master still complain about how many weapons come to the range and are dirty. Someone into weapons won't have a problem with taking apart any weapon but there are a lot of cops that are just not into weapons beretta have a take down level that really make it easy as do the taurus.

be safe

Kansan
October 1, 2009, 11:45 AM
However even if you aren't the best on maintenance they will still function very reliably while horribly dirty.

I know you weren't advocating not cleaning them, but thought I'd mention that I once went about a week without cleaning my Gov't issued Beretta in Iraq (I figured being in the holster would keep it clean enough). I went to the range and I found out that it had become a single shot pistol... Jamming after every round until I stepped off the firing line and cleaned it. Thank God I realized my mistake at a range and not in real life. Anyway, lesson learned. The Beretta is great but no matter how great a gun is, never bet your life on a dirty gun.

Avenger29
October 1, 2009, 12:47 PM
What do you think of it relative to the Taurus 92?

The only thing Taurus has over the Beretta is the safety placement- the Taurus safety/decocker is placed on the frame and is very accessible to the hands, and the PT-92 can be carried C&L with identical manual of arms to the 1911, BHP, etc.

That said, the Taurus PT-92 series is the only Taurus autoloader I halfway trust. It would be wonderful if Beretta produced a frame mounted safety version.

The Beretta 92fs is the 1911 of 9mm's in my opinion...

All steel
very popular
reliable and dependable
was/is a military issued weapon
5" barrel with great accuracy

No, the 1911 of 9mms is the FN Browning HiPower. The Beretta came along in the mid 70's, much later than the BHP.

DougDubya
October 1, 2009, 03:05 PM
Love the Beretta 92 and its frame-safetied Taurus cousin.

Morgo, that Beretta longslide you have is gorgeous!

Morgo
October 1, 2009, 08:05 PM
Love the Beretta 92 and its frame-safetied Taurus cousin.

Morgo, that Beretta longslide you have is gorgeous!

Thanx :)
Its a neat shooter.

jeepguy
October 1, 2009, 08:13 PM
i love mine & excellent value for the money +1 for the inox

w_houle
October 1, 2009, 08:15 PM
I want one, and I want a Taurus PT 92 for comparison

SwampWolf
October 1, 2009, 08:18 PM
At least one thing the Beretta has over the Taurus equivalent is resale value. It will always fetch a higher return than the Taurus-and maybe for no good reason other than the "name". That's just how it is.

redneck
October 1, 2009, 08:37 PM
I have a taurus PT92AR and have put a few hundred rounds through a beretta as well. From the factory the berreta has a nicer feel, I replaced the plastic grips on my taurus with a set from hogue that were less than $15 IIRC, and its got the same great feel as a beretta now.

I also replaced the rear sight with an adjustable. It always shot low from the factory which was my only real complaint about the gun, and was easily fixed.

As for reliability, I've never had an issue with it. Probably approaching 3000 rounds through the gun, think I've replaced the recoil spring 2 times and that is the only work I've done. I should add that its not a carry gun, and I have several other choices for home defense so I don't religiously clean the thing. I recently used it when I took a CCW course and when we went out on the range, out of 12 of us, only 3 of us made it through 75 rounds without a malfunction. Me, and 2 guys shooting brand new Sigs. There were glock,ruger, keltec,colt and a few others all represented. I'm sure that alot was user error, but the fact remains that my taurus ran flawlessly. I had to laugh too because we stopped at 75 rounds of shooting because the instructor said "its getting late and these guns are getting really dirty, they're going to need cleaned or we will just have more problems". Like I said, my taurus isn't my go to gun and doesn't get cleaned religiously. I STARTED the course about 150 rounds past a cleaning and didn't have a bit of trouble.

ohioshooter
October 1, 2009, 11:36 PM
I have a 92fs and although it fits my hand perfectly and by far the best fitted gun I have I don't carry it. I switch between a Glock 19 and a Kimber Crimson Carry. The Kimber will probably become my full time carry gun if I get the Grand Raptor II soon.

benderx4
October 2, 2009, 11:19 PM
Love my Berettas! One of the finest overall 9mms EVER made. Here's one of mine:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3449/3862519262_945f4a397f.jpg

(Taurus isn't the only one with a frame mounted safety!)

tnstr8shooter
October 3, 2009, 02:56 PM
The Beretta 92FS was my first handgun purchase many moons ago and I still have it. Short of utter destitution (is that a word?) I will never get rid of it.

I used it to qualify for my HCP and let one of the guys in the class use it. We both did great and he loved the gun too. My wife recently completed her HCP class using the same gun and also loaned it to another lady. My wife shot a perfect card; I don't know how the other lady did, but I do know she passed the class. Now the other lady has decided that the Beretta is the gun she wants to buy, despite the considerable size. The gun has been 100% reliable; I've never had a FTF, FTE, or any other problem, and I know I have limp-wristed it more than once.

I think the appeal to all of us has been that the gun is well balanced, has very little recoil, and looks great to boot. Also all of us have fairly large hands, so the size of the gun has never been a problem. I have recommended it as a first gun purchase several times, and I don't think you can go wrong making it your first semi purchase.

Let us know how your rental goes.

Darren

DFW1911
October 3, 2009, 06:10 PM
Mine have been outstanding, both in 9mm and .40 S&W. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another one.

My(2)Cents
October 3, 2009, 08:42 PM
The 92 is a service pistol, its ment to take a beating and keep shooting. If you want a pistol that will be reliable then you got it. accurisy on the other hand is not the best but it'll do. The fact that the military uses it doesn't mean anything they only switched to it because it fires the nato round and they got the lowest bid. It also has a thick grip (that's what she said) so if you don't have big hands then I wouldn't recomend it.
A lot of people down the 92 but I say if it works in your hand and you can hit black down range with it then go for it.

wrs840
October 3, 2009, 09:12 PM
My brother has a 92 he bought new over twenty years ago. He likes it a lot, never a problem with it. I've shot it a number of times, and while it may feel a tad large in my hands, it's very comfortable to shoot, and I group as small with it as anything I've shot. It's a time-tested classic, everyone should probably own one.

Les

IdahoLT1
October 4, 2009, 12:31 AM
benderx4, i envy you. Ive been looking for a Steel-I for quite some time. About the closest thing ive found is a stainles Vertec.

benderx4
October 4, 2009, 01:01 AM
benderx4, i envy you.

Thank you sir! Took me two years to find one, and when I did, it was totally by accident. And then wouldn't you know it, after finding the Steel I, I found a Billy less than a month later. Go figure.

Confederate
October 4, 2009, 01:04 PM
The Beretta 92 was the first of the ultra-reliables to hit the market. It was quickly followed by the S&W 459/559/659 and Sig Saur 9mm and .45. Until these guns hit the market, the Browning High Standard was about the most reliable, but it wasn't an ultra-reliable.

In the early military trials, the S&W 9mms had a malfunction average of once every 952 rounds. That's great, but the Beretta had a malfuntion average of once every 2,000 rounds. No Colt 1911 without extensive work could even approach that. (I still see 1911s jamming on ranges and many of them are expensive--much more so than more moden designs.) Until the Beretta 92 hit the market, most police departments still used revolvers. It was only after the new designs hit the market that autos really stopped jamming enough to be totally dependable.

Berettas are now only one brand of many that work. Their magazines have horrible springs that lose thei spring easily, but the gun is still so dependable that it will always have a following. In combat, no one in their right mind would want a 1911 Colt over a Beretta, and it's not a caliber issue at all. (Even if I wanted a .45, it would be a Glock or something.)

The only thing I'm still not sure of with the Beretta is its longevity. Perhaps others can address that.

happygeek
October 4, 2009, 08:44 PM
Personally, I don't have any complaints against the Beretta 92FS/M9. I've heard it criticized for being over sized for a 9mm, and of course, lots of criticism of the 9mm round itself; but I've never heard anyone criticize it as unreliable. In fact, the only time I've heard it's reliability mentioned was in praise of the M9.

I've never had an M9 jam on me at a range, the only place I've fired one, thank God. I bought a 92FS because it was relatively cheap, 9mm is cheaper than practicing with my 1911, and I do like the pistol. It's not beautiful, but it's not Glock ugly either. I have no complaints with my 92FS either; about 1,200 rounds later, still no jams firing everything from Brown Bear to PMC (granted it's never fired more than 150 rounds or so between good cleanings).

The only real complaint I might have is with the mags, but it does depend on what company you buy them from [in terms of reliability]. I still don't understand why they're $30 a piece, when 20 round M14 mags are $30 or a little less and Sig 1911 mags can be had for $13 ...

golden
October 5, 2009, 12:04 AM
I personally like and carry the BERETTA 92 and 96. The 96D Brigadier was my agency issue gun for about 10 years. The only problem was the weight and we beat them to a pulp. We used the 155 gr. JHP ammo at 1200 fps. It never failed in the field and no one who has complained about the reliability or accuracy of the guns, only their size and weight.
Using the 155 grain load, it hit with the power we had been used too with the former .357 magnum 125 grain JHP load.

I still shoot the BERETTA for fun, use it for self defense in the house or when I am traveling.

If you go for a .40 S&W caliber, I highly recommend that you get a Brigadier model with the stonger slide (it has a built up area around the locking lug cuts). If not, stick with the milder 180 grain ammo.
I would pass on the 180 grain .40 S&W loads. They do not seem to do anything that the 9m.m. +p and +p+ load cannot do with a larger ammo capacity.

For a concealed gun, the 92/96 is a bit large, like a full size 1911. Even the compact 92 13 and 8 shot models are still fairly large. They are a bit lighter and I like to carry my 8 shot 92 CDM model when I go for a walk at night.

Right now, if you are willing to go with a double action only gun, you can get a really good price on a 92 or 96. I just bought a 96D Vertec model for $425.00 as it was double action only.
Along with the smaller grip, it adds a light rail which I wanted for a house gun.

The BERETTA has the best double action only trigger I have tried and sold me on the double action only trigger system. It is as smooth as a well tuned revolver trigger.

Jim

blue german
October 5, 2009, 09:55 AM
Avenger 29

Beretta did produce a 92 model with the frame-mounted safety (much like the 1911). I know, I own one. This is the ORIGINAL Beretta model 92. They seem to show uip from time to time,
even though they can be as much as 34 years old (mine is marked as having been proofed in 1989). There is even an updated 92 with the frame mounted safety (called 92 STOCK).

Take a search thru Gunbroker or some other site....or search Google. There are a number of these older Berettas up for sale now.

sfc_mark
October 5, 2009, 11:05 AM
The fact that the military uses it doesn't mean anything they only switched to it because it fires the nato round and they got the lowest bid.

They got the contract because the Army wanted to switch to 9mm and the Berettas went an average of 18,000 rounds between malfunctions. None of the others tested came close. When a pissed off New England Senator called foul on awarding the contract to a foreign company, they opened the trials again with a few more competitors...the Beretta still far outclassed all the competition.

When the Army tested the M9A1 for the Marines a couple of years ago (the Army does all small arms trials for DOD), they got an average of 20,000 rounds between malfunctions.

Taurus_9mm
January 26, 2010, 01:44 AM
I really love my Taurus PT92 and have a few thousand rounds through it now. I would like to add a Beretta 92FS at some point as well though, and if it's an INOX, all the better. :)

KJS
January 26, 2010, 02:47 AM
It also has a thick grip (that's what she said) so if you don't have big hands then I wouldn't recomend it.

Yeah, I see that grip size always comes up when this model is discussed. When I rented a Beretta 92 last fall the grip certainly was quite large compared to any other grip I had ever felt. A guy working at that gun shop showed me another Beretta model that he personally preferred due to it having a smaller grip size. I held up one of my XL paws and asked what he thought. He didn't think a big grip would be any problem for my big hands.

I too have found the "it's big & bulky" complaint to be another very common one. Certainly, if one was looking for a concealed weapon, this isn't the 9mm one would select unless they were in Alaska wearing a parka year round.

I would only expect to fire it at targets. There is always the very small chance that a bad guy could get shot if he decided to break in, but it would really be recreational with defense as only a secondary use.

After renting a Glock 22 earlier this month I discovered that lighter doesn't automatically equally better. I'm a novice shooter, but at last my targets don't look totally embarrassing with relatively heavy steel frame revolvers. That Glock chambered in .40 S&W even had a laser mounted on it and still my shots were terrible. I found that light guns really like to jump around a lot. That same day I rented an S&W 629 with 6.5" barrel. Despite the hard kick of a .44 Mag I was able to hit my target the same as I can with a .357 or .38.

That suggested to me that more more weight & size isn't always a bad thing. And, like one comment above, I too would say a Beretta 92 has more style than a Glock that, while very practical & reliable I'm sure, looks like a block of plastic totally lacking in style.

KJS
January 26, 2010, 02:53 AM
I really love my Taurus PT92 and have a few thousand rounds through it now. I would like to add a Beretta 92FS at some point as well though, and if it's an INOX, all the better.

Being a newbie, I'm forced to ask what INOX means?

Why would you add a Beretta 92FS if you already have the Taurus version of it that you really love? Can I assume you just love collecting guns? Reminds me of one pic I saw on this board where a guy displayed his entire collection of S&W revolvers on his dining room table. I didn't even try to count, but there were certainly more than 50 of them -- and who knows how many other revolvers he had by other makers and how many autoloaders & long guns he might have had. In S&W revolvers alone he had enough to shoot a different one each week, kind of like how women collect shoes.:)

Bovice
January 26, 2010, 03:35 AM
the INOX is the stainless steel version.

I don't own a Beretta or Taurus 92, but I have shot the Taurus. First time shooting it, I made one ragged hole at 15 yards. The balance was excellent. While people complain about its weight, the weight makes it very easy to shoot accurately at a decent pace. The trigger was also very nice. Can't go wrong.

Choosing one over the other-I'd get the Beretta. No specific reason... Just because.

KJS
January 26, 2010, 03:51 AM
While people complain about its weight, the weight makes it very easy to shoot accurately at a decent pace.

It's odd how many will complain about weight in a 9mm, yet I bet many of them have a .22 pistol with a bull barrel that weighs more than most 9mm guns.

Renting a Beretta 92 was the first, and thus far only, time I've fired 9mm. I was quite surprised by how much kick that little round has. I was clearly biased by those who criticize it for lack of stopping power. These would generally be the folks who think .45 ACP is the ultimate defensive handgun caliber and who often think 1911s were handed down by the god of guns to fire .45s.

(Renting a 1911 is on my to do list, since I surely must try this iconic gun that served the US military for 75 years and which American Rifleman put as #1 on their list of the top 10 handguns of all time. The president of Beretta wrote the NRA and asked why his M9/92FS wasn't in their top 10 after a quarter century of US military use, getting that gun a cover story the next month.)

Jenrick
January 26, 2010, 04:16 AM
KJS, you'll probably find a .45 kick less then a lot of guns do in .40 S&W.

Back to Berettas, I picked up a 92FS to have to use when instructing DOD personnel on the range. I'd shot one a few times before this and found them to be good guns in general. The main things it has going for it over most other pistols:

Long sight radius is standard, sure a 5" 1911 or G24 have a longer sight radius, but compared to other service pistols it's got them beat.

Open top slide. It's next to impossible to get a stove pipe or FTE with them, and even if you do it's stupidly easy to clear.

Continual evolution. Not too many pistols are as well used/tested in training and in combat as the Beretta. The M9 has continued to evolve due to this usage.

It is a large gun and if you have short fingers the trigger reach can be long. I'm glad I picked one up, and it's certainly a fun gun to shoot. Far as relieability goes, I've got my G34 up to about 40K rounds malf freesince 2005, my USP .45 at about 8K malf free since 2009, and I'm starting to get some rounds through my 92FS. I expect it to shoot just as well as the other two.

-Jenrick

KurtC
January 26, 2010, 04:55 AM
http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e85/Stutzen/M9A1023.jpg

KJS
January 26, 2010, 05:29 AM
Not too many pistols are as well used/tested in training and in combat as the Beretta.

Yeah, that was a major point made in American Rifleman. Beretta had to compete with all the other gun makers to win a military contract and it's been subjected to all sorts of heavy use and abuse in harsh environments and they still keep working.

The gun shop/range where I rented a Beretta 92 said it was their most rented gun, so it seems to appeal to enough people to get that kind of attention.

I also notice that Cabela's chronically has this model on sale -- it's on sale in their next flyer that I just looked at online. I gather it must be popular since it would seem pointless to stock & frequently advertise a gun few buy.

Taurus_9mm
January 27, 2010, 01:25 AM
Being a newbie, I'm forced to ask what INOX means?

Why would you add a Beretta 92FS if you already have the Taurus version of it that you really love? Can I assume you just love collecting guns? Reminds me of one pic I saw on this board where a guy displayed his entire collection of S&W revolvers on his dining room table. I didn't even try to count, but there were certainly more than 50 of them -- and who knows how many other revolvers he had by other makers and how many autoloaders & long guns he might have had. In S&W revolvers alone he had enough to shoot a different one each week, kind of like how women collect shoes.:)
Greetings KJS,

Personally speaking, I've desired one of the Beretta 92s on and off over the years, though I never have picked one up in all that time. Lately I've been thinking about them with greater frequency, as well as the more recent Beretta PX4 Storm series. I consider myself a shooter foremost but I suppose I do collect also to a degree; some of mine see much more time locked up than out on the range but I try to remedy that so none are neglected.

Have you considered purchasing a 92FS or did you go ahead and buy one? :)

www.taurusarmed.net www.gunnerforum.com

wbwanzer
January 27, 2010, 11:01 AM
I picked up this Italian Inox just last week. Hoping to get to the range later today to try it out.

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m145/wbwanzer/Beretta92FSInox006.jpg

mljdeckard
January 27, 2010, 12:06 PM
I have owned the T-92 and the Beretta, as well as having carried the M-9 extensively.

It's kind of a love/hate thing. Some of the things that make it nice to shoot are also the reasons I don't like it anymore. It is big, wide, and bulky. This makes it tough to conceal, but it also makes it very easy to shoot, as that weight soaks up recoil. Bulk isn't as much of a concern for a service pistol, where soldiers don't have to tuck it in their waistband, but it might be a problem for the guys who want to carry it concealed every day.

The single action trigger pull and recovery is as good as it gets. It seems to shoot itself. The double action pull is a bit long, but it's what I learned on, so I don't mind it. I also decided that it would have to be a split-second life and death emergency for me to have to draw it without having time to cock the hammer.

However, I carried it for a long time, and used other guns for a dozen years or so. Now I'm back in the military, and I have been issued an M-9 again. I really don't like the feel. After using mostly Glocks and 1911s for the last several years, the Beretta feels like a lump in my hands, not comfortable at all.

My T-92 experience wasn't good, I had a lot of problems with it. Light firing pin strikes, and the double-action was slipping, dropping the hammer before it was pulled all the way to the rear. A couple of gunsmiths told me it was just dirty, but they couldn't fix it, so I got rid of it. I did like the frame-mounted, downswept safety.

outerlimit
January 27, 2010, 01:07 PM
I do like the safety system on the Taurus vs. the 92FS's frame mounted safety. But I prefer a G type decocker over both. That is really my only complaint about the Beretta though. It is definitely the better gun of the two. I don't really see the point of a safety on a DA pistol. And Beretta mags are more available of course. Not that it is much of an issue post-AWB. I would prefer a G type decocker on my 92FS instead of the safety, because the safety really serves no practical purpose IMO, I only use it as a decocker.

The biggest weak point of the Beretta and Taurus 92 copy (I won't call it a clone, because it's not) is the trigger return sping. This part is prone to breaking and I've seen many do so on both guns. The Wolff INS unit solves this little problem and is an easy drop in part.

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