Exploding bullets


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fireman
September 26, 2009, 10:50 AM
Years ago I had a room mate that would re-load 357 bullets with a Lee Loader.
He would ream out a hollow point just enough to fit a primer.
It would pop the primer on impact.
Have any of you guys heard of this?
Fireman

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LubeckTech
September 26, 2009, 11:00 AM
I've never heard of that trick but there used to be and probably still are commercially loaded amma known as exploders that exploded on impact. I remember these from the early 1980s when they sold for about one dollar a round.

Walkalong
September 26, 2009, 12:03 PM
I used to make exploding pellets for my pellet gun when I was a wee lad. Lots of fun, but lots of work.

Jim Watson
September 26, 2009, 12:20 PM
The Exploder bullets of the 1970s were thought to be a hollowpoint capped with a primer, backed by a piece of shot to hit the anvil upon impact to be certain of igniting it, then a little fast burning powder. I only ever saw one fired and that into a log. All that was visible was a wisp of smoke coming out of the caliber sized hole in the wood.

jaholder1971
September 26, 2009, 12:27 PM
A very controversial method of getting instant expansion and limited penetration.

MMCSRET
September 26, 2009, 12:54 PM
I have a box of "Exploders". 38 Special, doesn't say what weight the bullet is. box holds 12 rounds, 2 have been fired. Distributed by Bingham LTD., Atlanta GA. 30341.
Super Vel Head stamp. I've had them since 1978 or so, got them in a trade. Price stamped $9.00 for 12 rounds. Big money in the 70's.

rcmodel
September 26, 2009, 01:26 PM
At one time I had a 45-70 hollow-point bullet mold that cast a 475 grain bullet with a very deep HP cavity. A LG rifle primer would press fit perfectly in the nose.

I tried filling the cavity with Bullseye pistol powder, as well as FFFFG black powder.

The BP gave a satisfying puff of white smoke, but other then that, there was no measurable differance in expansion at all in moist dirt. That bullet would mushroom perfectly no matter what you put in it, or not.

I am quite sure my 45-70 HP held a much larger amount of powder then anything you could possibly put in a pistol bullet.

I think "exploding" is too strong a term!

Perhaps if I had filled the cavity with C4 or something, maybe?

rc

armoredman
September 26, 2009, 02:03 PM
Tradename in AZ was Devastators, had 10 in 9mm when I was young and stupid.

capttom
September 26, 2009, 03:41 PM
I had a "friend" who swore a primer in a hollow point worked, but he was unreliable in those sort of things. I never knew it to work. The same with a drop of mercury in the cavity. Isn't that what the gunsmith loaded in The Day of the Jackal in, what, a .22 magnum?

Oyeboten
September 26, 2009, 08:27 PM
Shot Gun Primer would be better...or, a high-power, special-type 'Blank' .22 Shell of the type used for 'Powder Actuated Nailers' that Shot Hardened Bolts or Nails into Steel or concrete in Construction.


Empty 'live' .22 Case filled with old time Photographer's 'Flash Powder'...


Any of these fitted in a modified 'Hollow Point', with an Anvil...


Never tried it...but, I'd imagine it'd work very well.

KyJim
September 26, 2009, 08:44 PM
. The same with a drop of mercury in the cavity. Isn't that what the gunsmith loaded in The Day of the Jackal in, what, a .22 magnum?
You're right about the drop of mercury but I don't recall the caliber of the gun. I always thought I would like a gun like that one -- disassembles into a crutch.

earplug
September 26, 2009, 11:49 PM
Years ago I did this with a 45 ACP.
I shot into a lead plate about six inches round and 3/4 inch thick. I never saw a difference the impact area.
I even added a bit of bullseye in the nose cavity.

shotgunjoel
September 27, 2009, 12:15 AM
I've never heard of that trick but there used to be and probably still are commercially loaded amma known as exploders that exploded on impact. I remember these from the early 1980s when they sold for about one dollar a round.

Wasn't Reagan shot with "exploding" 22 ammo?

Oyeboten
September 27, 2009, 06:12 PM
(Re: 'Reagan') Seems I remember hearing that...dunno...it was a medium-barrel-length .22 Revolver though, I think...

Gary K
September 27, 2009, 06:25 PM
(Re 2: Reagan) From Wikipedia (trust if you wish): The pistol Hinckley used "had been loaded with six "Devastator"-brand .22LR cartridges, which contained small lead azide explosive charges designed to explode on contact. The rounds were not manufactured in the U.S.; any bullet which contained actual explosives would have been classified as an illegal explosive device under U.S. federal law at the time that Hinckley purchased them. All six bullets failed to explode."

Oyeboten
September 27, 2009, 07:57 PM
Hi Gary K,



Interesting...I'd forgotten the details...


Found this...


http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/episode/shooting-of-ronald-reagan-3036/Photos#tab-Photos/2


Luckily for the victims, the 'Devistator' Bullets probably needed a longer Barrel...more fps...to function as advertised.

1911Tuner
September 27, 2009, 08:07 PM
I tersted a few of the .38s back in the day from a 4-inch Model 10. Properly prepared ballistic gelatin was the medium, laced with dowel rods to simulate ribs. The ones that didn't pop didn't expand at all...even when they hit the dowel rods. The few that did expand didn't expand any better than standard 110-grain hollowpoint Super Vels and Speer's 110-grain JHP loaded to Super Vel speeds.

MMCSRET...The .38 Devastator rounds were 110-grain JHPs.

Gary K
September 27, 2009, 08:39 PM
Oyeboten: ... http://channel.nationalgeographic.co...s#tab-Photos/2

Seeing the video over again brings back a lot. Definitely shows how lethal a .22 can be, even if the exploding rounds didn't work.

The comment on the video about not wearing body armor that day is very telling. A lot of lessons to remember.

Randy1911
September 27, 2009, 08:53 PM
I had a friend in the early 80's that had a box of 20 - 44 JHP that were labeled "exploding tip"( they were just the slug). He was too scared to load any of them so we never found out if they worked. A cop friend of his gave them to him. Can't remember the name.

pbearperry
September 27, 2009, 08:57 PM
It has been my experience that gimmick bullets only work in movies out of Hollywood.

Lee Roder
September 27, 2009, 09:07 PM
http://www.hi-vel.com/Catalog__23/catalog__23.html

:evil:

tactikel
September 27, 2009, 10:03 PM
The tip of a .58 cal Minie ball can be drilled with a .25" bit and a .22 blank shell could be epoxied in the cavity, it would explode on impact (as related in the Dixie Gun Works catalog circa 1968). This load mimicked a load developed during the Civil War- and what prompted the formation of the Geneva Convention, to stop the horrific wounds these rounds produced. It sure made war more civilized huh? :fire:

LSCurrier
September 27, 2009, 10:16 PM
The only exploding bullets that I remember were in either a:


James Bond movie

or

Matt Helm movie


don't remember which.

Luke

Kindrox
September 27, 2009, 10:32 PM
He would ream out a hollow point just enough to fit a primer.


I did that as a kid with a .45. Recovered bullets showed the black remnants of the primer poping, but with the report of the .45 of course you did not hear the bullet pop. The bullet did not explode either, the hollow points pretty much just expanded like they would have anyway. Sometimes the primer was still stuck in the bullet lead, sometimes not.

My take away was the primer trick didn't do anything usefull/fun.

You're right about the drop of mercury but I don't recall the caliber of the gun.

I did that too, sealing the mercury into the HP (I reamed out a little deeper cavity). This one seemed to work a little better than the primers, the hollow point expanded into a very nice mushroom. The downside was after a while the mercury absorbed into the lead, so they didn't store well.

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