Have you actually worn out a Rockchucker or similar press


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R.W.Dale
October 6, 2009, 09:18 PM
The lube thread got me to thinking about just how overbuilt the average heavy grade single stage press is. I wonder if anyone has actually worn one out or even just used one or mistreated one enough to cause any major play in the mechanism?

If so please post about it. Appx round count, years owned, improper or mistreatment or anything that might shed light on how long these things might last.

Myself I suspect one would last my, my children and grandchildren's lifetime

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ReloaderFred
October 6, 2009, 09:41 PM
I had one that I had for about 20 some odd years, and the main swivel rod froze inside the housing. I tried to fix it myself, but couldn't get enough tension on it to free it up. I called RCBS and explained the problem. They said to send it to them, and within a week I had a brand new Rockchucker, which is still going strong.

I'm assuming I didn't get enough oil into the pivot point, and it rusted solid.

Hope this helps.

Fred

R.W.Dale
October 6, 2009, 09:52 PM
I had one that I had for about 20 some odd years, and the main swivel rod froze inside the housing. I tried to fix it myself, but couldn't get enough tension on it to free it up. I called RCBS and explained the problem. They said to send it to them, and within a week I had a brand new Rockchucker, which is still going strong.

I'm assuming I didn't get enough oil into the pivot point, and it rusted solid.

Hope this helps.

Fred

Intresting? What kind of environment was this press used or kept in. Climate controlled or ambient outdoor

PA Freedom
October 6, 2009, 10:07 PM
I think most (if not all) single stage presses are extremely overbuilt, and it would be almost impossible to wear one out in several lifetimes. Just make sure the ram dosent rust and the pivot points are lubed and you should be good to go for at least 100 years! I know of several ancient Lyman & Pacific's that work like new. FWIW, Lee has admitted in their advertising that this is why they use aluminum and plastic for many of their presses and other products, so their prices stay low and the customer dosen't have to pay more for durability thats not actually needed.

ReloaderFred
October 6, 2009, 11:36 PM
krochus,

I had used this press for years in Central California, and when I moved to the Oregon Coast, I brought it with me. After about 4 years here, it froze up. It was in my garage, which has a heater vent from the forced air unit open all the time, but we only use our heater during the winter months. During most of the year, the humidity here is between 60% and 70%, since we've been known to get a little precipitation on occasion........ The garage is drywalled and insulated, and rarely gets below about 62 degrees inside during the winter. It also rarely gets above 70 degrees inside in the summer, and we don't have air-conditioning.

I obviously didn't get enough oil on the pivot points, which was my fault.

Hope this helps.

Fred

freakshow10mm
October 7, 2009, 01:19 AM
Wore out a few women. Never a reloading press.

VINTAGE-SLOTCARS
October 7, 2009, 02:12 AM
No. I've ued mine since 1973 and have never had a problem with it. Oh wait,, i did screw up the threads a little when i used it as an anvel. Oil it once a year and it will last a lifetime.

Afy
October 7, 2009, 03:50 AM
I have stripped the threads from a Rockchucker...

R.W.Dale
October 7, 2009, 03:54 AM
I have stripped the threads from a Rockchucker...

OH come on! you know good and well that we would want details

Jubjub
October 7, 2009, 06:16 AM
I still use a Lyman Spartan press that was a gift from an uncle 25 years ago. It loads most of my pistol ammo, so several thousand rounds a year. Before that, my uncle used it as his only press for 20 years or more, and he shoots a lot more than I do. I don't see any evidence of wear.

qajaq59
October 7, 2009, 06:17 AM
I can't even imagine wearing out most any of the presses. Especially the older ones. For a long time the manufacturers had a competition going in their advertising as to who had the strongest press. It got so ridiculous that they ended up with presses that would have survived an atomic blast. I have a Herter that I bought used in 1965, and when the archeologists dig it up 10,000 years from now, I suspect it'll still work. :D

243winxb
October 7, 2009, 09:10 AM
RCBS Rock Chucker got slop in the ram from loading pistol. When i would seat a bullet in 243win, the ram would flop forward at the top of its travel. My thought were that the bullet was no longer being seated straight. Primer dirt mixed with oil had made the cast iron frame larger in diameter or linkage wear??. RCBS sent me a new press, free. When the Dillon RL450 progressive was available i bought one for pistol & 223 rem. I started loading with Lee Hammer Loaders, then a RCBS JR press. Then a New Rock Chucker from 1977 to 1998. Note: Clean press to remove dirt before lubing. From RCBS> This press was lubricated at the factory. However, it is necessary to lubricate all moving parts from time to time with gun oil. If rust spots appear , swab lightly with gun oil and wipe dry. Care should be taken not to apply oil where it could come in contact with primer pockets or primers. Oil will deactivate primers. It is a goood practice to clean the press prior to lubrication to remove grit and other residue. You will note the ease at which the epoxy enamel paint wipes clean. This finish is impervious to oil and is extremely chip and fade resistant.

Historian
October 7, 2009, 12:14 PM
When I first started loading on mine, I foolishly let the handle get loose in the block. Completely stripped the threads both on the handle and in the block. I called RCBS and they sent me both parts no questions asked. Now I check the handle nut before every loading session and tighten it with a very long wrench if it's loose. I haven't had to do that in quite a while.

Historian

GW Staar
October 7, 2009, 12:42 PM
Been using mine for 38 years. Still no slop, yet the ram is as smooth as a babies.... The pivots are still fine too, no slop. My reloading room is in the house. Humidity in NM is from evap. coolers in the summer. Dry as hell rest of the year. Use spray lithium in the pivots, then graphite in a grease base is wiped on the ram with handle up, handle is pushed down, then it's wiped on again. Then I wipe it clean, working the ram up and down, rewiping until I have a light graphite film and not enough grease to attract anything. The product is "Gun Slick" in a small tube. It must work.

LeonCarr
October 7, 2009, 02:00 PM
The Rockchucker was my first press. I bought it in 1988, and it is now used by a buddy of mine as his first press. No issues what so ever.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

Floppy_D
October 7, 2009, 02:09 PM
Both of my presses, a Dillon 450 and an RS2, were bought used from a guy who had been running them reguarly since the early 80s. They're still running strong. :)

Afy
October 7, 2009, 03:36 PM
Krochus: Pretty much what happened to historian. Unfortunately no RCBS support in France, so I now load left handed. :)

Otto
October 7, 2009, 04:21 PM
Myself I suspect one would last my, my children and grandchildren's lifetime
A Rockchucker may indeed last a lifetime but my kids scoff at the notion of spending a hour or more to load a 100 rounds on a RC. Once they got up to speed on a progressive there was no turning back.
As a consequence, I have 2 Rockchuckers and 1 RCBS Jr. collecting dust...

Rugg_Ed
October 7, 2009, 04:37 PM
50 + yrs use of a old ECHO still in use, its buddy the R C 30 + yrs still in use, a Lyman turret bought used 12 yrs ago still fine, just hope the blue ones last, there going on 14 yrs. I think they will probably get sold at a yard sale when I am gone.

THe Dove
October 8, 2009, 06:47 PM
I gotta RCII from 1992 and it's still crankin out great rounds. Just a minute bit of slack when the ram is all the way up. But thousands of rounds have been cycled thru. No complaints here.

The Dove

R.W.Dale
October 8, 2009, 07:13 PM
A Rockchucker may indeed last a lifetime but my kids scoff at the notion of spending a hour or more to load a 100 rounds on a RC. Once they got up to speed on a progressive there was no turning back.
As a consequence, I have 2 Rockchuckers and 1 RCBS Jr. collecting dust...

In my opinion with a progressive you're simply "making ammo"

to produce top notch "handloads" a single stage is required

you don't see many LR or BR matches won with ammo produced on a progressive

oldreloader
October 8, 2009, 07:17 PM
In my opinion with a progressive you're simply "making ammo"

to produce top notch "handloads" a single stage is required

you don't see many LR or BR matches won with ammo produced on a progressive
krochus, I do believe you have a good defintion there!! There is a difference between making ammo and handloading..Nothing wrong with either, but IMO there is a difference.

Maj Dad
October 8, 2009, 08:26 PM
qwjaq, I have the twin to your Herter's. Mine has lived through the swamps of south LA (St Bernard Parish), St Simons Island, GA, and from AL, TX to New Mexico to the low country of SC, and it's still bullet proof. What a hunk...

ADKWOODSMAN
October 8, 2009, 08:31 PM
RCBS Jr. from 1968 still perfect.

Used for Bullseye (.45), IPSC and SASS loads.

Marlin 45 carbine
October 8, 2009, 08:32 PM
not my chucker, 20 yrs and no perceptible play in it. from '06, X39, 45-70, 30-30, .300 W. Mag and assorted pistol rounds.

Drail
October 8, 2009, 09:00 PM
I really am in total agreement with Krochus. I started on a Rockchuck and 25 years later I still use it for everything. All of the crud from depriming does find its way into the ram bore and I dismantle and clean it pretty regularly. Best lube I have found is Dexron ATF. It won't evaporate off and dissolves all that carbon until I get around to cleaning it.

brassbullets12
October 8, 2009, 10:55 PM
i had a rockchucker 20+ years , it worked great.. Who knows how much it loaded how much before i got it, ?? it looked well used.... i used it all the time, even resized bullets with it (copper jacket bullets) with it, it in very good condition ,when i bought a old HERTER'S for a freind to start cheap reloading. i like it so much i gave him my rockchucker. that herter's is one heck of a press.. by the way i have 3 more presses, 10 years or less, 1 RCBS, AND 2 MORE HORANDY. THE HERTERS IS MY FAVORITE.. IT IS A WORK HORSE!! and gave near nothing for it!

Borg
October 9, 2009, 03:49 AM
Worn out two by not cleaning the primer residue off the base and ram, guess I didn't learn the first time. I mean 1/8 in movement in the ram will give BAD runout.
On my 3rd, (12 yrs) but don't deprime on it at all, and wipe down immediately after sizing. (the powder residue can also wear the frame out)
Borg

ranger335v
October 9, 2009, 10:51 AM
"FWIW, Lee has admitted in their advertising that this is why they use aluminum and plastic for many of their presses and other products, so their prices stay low and the customer dosen't have to pay more for durability thats not actually needed."

I never thought there was any doubt about that. And it's a point well made, any press that's taken care of will more than out live the owner so what's the point of massive overbuilding? Note that most, perhaps all, of the above "failures" were NOT from use, they were from neglect!

I have my "old" and first Lyman press from '65 and my "new" RC II from '87 plus a couple of Lee "Reloader" presses from "90. All have seen a lot for use, all have had their ram's kept clean and oiled, none have any mentionable wear, why should they? And, contrary to popular thought, a little ram play actually HELPS to insure good ram-case-bullet-die alignment. A round case will surely enter straight into a round die hole unless it's prevented from doing so by a tight but off axis ram!

Many RCBS owners praise their presses for how long they lasted. Few of them seem to recognise that RCBS presses are no more long lived than any others of their type! Even Lee (and RCBS, and Hornady) alum alloy bodied presses will last a very long time if they are kept clean and lightly oiled.

Bottom line, anyone who wears out a good press does so not with "use" but misuse or neglect. Like a solidly rusted "main swivel rod", what ever that is.

GW Staar
October 9, 2009, 12:13 PM
I never thought there was any doubt about that. And it's a point well made, any press that's taken care of will more than out live the owner so what's the point of massive overbuilding? Note that most, perhaps all, of the above "failures" were NOT from use, they were from neglect!

I agree, but there's more to it than that...for some of us.

Many RCBS owners praise their presses for how long they lasted. Few of them seem to recognise that RCBS presses are no more long lived than any others of their type! Even Lee (and RCBS, and Hornady) alum alloy bodied presses will last a very long time if they are kept clean and lightly oiled.


The heavy duty cast iron presses like the Rock Chucker and the Redding have important advantages over the light-weights for those who need those advantages.

1. They have more mechanical advantage than the light-weights and that means far less fatigue for the reloader, especially when resizing the larger rifle calibers or case forming from one caliber to another.

2. Heavy cast bodies & beefier pivots insure that they WILL last a lifetime being used day after day doing that type of heavy duty reloading.

They are admittedly more expensive than the Aluminum light weights, but what's a $100 one time hit, when its going to be on your bench for 40 years.
$2.50 a year?

IMO, even if one plans to only load 9mm pistol, having the bigger press, will insure you can change your mind, and become a reloading fanatic if you want to. If your press wears YOU out, that's less likely isn't it?

R.W.Dale
October 9, 2009, 01:39 PM
I don't know bout that. I've actually ripped the toggle mechanism off the little lee press.

CoRoMo
October 9, 2009, 01:50 PM
Appx round count

You've got to be kidding me. I couldn't begin to guess my overall round count. Even if I tossed out a guess, I'd likely be off by several thousand rounds.

Anyway, my Rockchucker is still going strong... and I bought it well used.:D

Friendly, Don't Fire!
October 9, 2009, 02:09 PM
When I first started loading on mine, I foolishly let the handle get loose in the block. Completely stripped the threads both on the handle and in the block. I called RCBS and they sent me both parts no questions asked. Now I check the handle nut before every loading session and tighten it with a very long wrench if it's loose. I haven't had to do that in quite a while.

Historian
Instead of constantly checking to be sure the parts are tight, I put some red (high-strength) Loctite on the handle and lock nut threads and tightened real tight with a wrench.

That handle is not going to loosen unless I put a heatgun to the lower handle block and get it so hot I cannot touch it, then use the wrench to remove the locking nut.

My point being, I HAVE NO INTENTION OF EVER REMOVING or altering my press. If a "lefty" ends up with it some day, they can figure out how to remove the handle bar.

ranger335v
October 9, 2009, 02:41 PM
"IMO, even if one plans to only load 9mm pistol, having the bigger press, will insure you can change your mind, and become a reloading fanatic if you want to. If your press wears YOU out, that's less likely isn't it?"

Seems you totally missed my point. Note that I too have an RC, I'm just not in undue awe of it. In fact, I KNOW it's not a bit better than any simular press by Lyman, Redding, Hornady or Lee. And certainly we agree the dedicated user should get a press that serves his needs, to do otherwise would be silly. But suggesting a casual user buy what you and I "need" when he does not does him no service.

Considering the really LOW cost of the less costly alum alloy framed presses (or Lee's all steel Classic Cast), including those from RCBS, even if the purchaser does decide to buy a bigger, stronger press later. When he needs it, he can get it and still have the less costly press for dedicated tasks, such as a decapper or recapper, which is what I use my two little Lee Reloaders for. And I use my Lyman turret for short cases with great success, without having to work the long throw RC lever to do it. So...? Using the right tool for the work at hand, or the majority of work, counts. Every specialty tool has its good and less good points, no blanket answers for anything.

Anyone who breaks small presses, etc, would seem to have little feel for mechanical things. He would do well to get the biggest, most massive tools he can find to reduce user damage to his equipment.

R.W.Dale
October 9, 2009, 03:25 PM
Every specialty tool has its good and less good points, no blanket answers for anything.


Anyone who breaks small presses, etc, would seem to have little feel for mechanical things.

Talk about contradicting yourself.

Ive built Both my Jeeps from the ground up, regeard, fabricated components installed lockers, and built motors. In the past I've- made fuel injection systems from junkyard parts, done engine swaps, had a 12 second el camino, was a mechanic and am currently employed in heavy steel fabrication. My first car cost $50 in 1994 because it didn't come with an engine I had that rectified before I was 16

And yes I broke one of the cheap toy "package" presses

Hmmmmmmm! perhaps you should think twice before you make blanket statments

rfwobbly
October 9, 2009, 06:29 PM
I have a CH press that, judging from the powder dispenser that came with it, was made about 1960. I believe I'm the 4th or 5th owner. The guys at CH told me they had only seen one other reloading set this old.

The dowel pin at the bottom of the handle has a worn hole and falls out. I got to put some Loctite "bearing mount" on that to hold it in place one day. Other than that the press is in great shape. I keep it oiled, but what the other owners did is anybody's guess.

Over-built is an understatement.

SuperNaut
October 9, 2009, 06:50 PM
Mine is far from worn out, 'course it's still in the box...


Gotta get the garage cleaned out and that bench built!:)

qajaq59
October 9, 2009, 08:10 PM
I missed the approx number of rounds in the OP. Let me see now since 1965 I loaded..... Hmmmm, Lots?

Encoreman
October 9, 2009, 09:30 PM
Not to hijack the thread, but I believe Ed said that his presses would be sold at a garage/yard sale after he's gone. That doesn't have to be the case. I think every reloader has reloading friends who would either appreciate the press and other components or know where to sell them to those who would appreciate it. Leave these things in your will to someone who will enjoy and appreciate them, my 2 cents. Mac

BigJakeJ1s
October 9, 2009, 10:05 PM
And, contrary to popular thought, a little ram play actually HELPS to insure good ram-case-bullet-die alignment. A round case will surely enter straight into a round die hole unless it's prevented from doing so by a tight but off axis ram!

That would be true if there wasn't a lateral force on the bottom end of the ram that wants to push the cartridge out of line with the die as it is advanced and withdrawn from the die. What's worse, the lateral force reverses direction at mid-stroke on the way up, at the top, and again midway through the down stroke. The lateral force and deflection of the Forster Co-Ax "ram" is uniform throughout the stroke, only reversing when the stroke reverses and there is no pressure, so the cartridge can easily float to realign itself with the die.

Any press will provide better results if you pause at intervals on the way up and the way down during sizing and seating. This allows the pressure on the shell holder to abate, and the cartridge can then slide around a bit to find center in the die.

Andy

GW Staar
October 9, 2009, 10:42 PM
Thirty years ago, old timers then, suggested I loosen the spring that holds the shell holder on my R.C., so that it lightly keeps the shellholder in the slot. Done for the same reason: to allow the case to center itself as it goes into the die and thus making the resulting round more concentric. Nobody ever suggested abusing the press to make more slop on purpose. Now I'm an old timer and I can say from experience...that the advice was good.

BigJakeJ1s
October 10, 2009, 08:00 PM
I agree that a loose fitting shell holder is a good idea. But then there isn't a handle and linkage on the other end of it trying to shove it out of line with the die either. I use a co-ax press that is designed to provide float both in the shell holder and the die itself. In the right place, float is a good thing. In the wrong place, it isn't.

Andy

ranger335v
October 10, 2009, 09:32 PM
"Hmmmmmmm! perhaps you should think twice before you make blanket statments "

The first of my statements you copy is self evidently true. And I DID qualify the second with a "seems". Thus, the one "blanket statement" is clearly true and the other ....??? Sooo.... who needs to think twice? Or even once?

R.W.Dale
October 10, 2009, 09:51 PM
"Hmmmmmmm! perhaps you should think twice before you make blanket statments "

The first of my statements you copy is self evidently true. And I DID qualify the second with a "seems". Thus, the one "blanket statement" is clearly true and the other ....??? Sooo.... who needs to think twice? Or even once?

Why don't you call every pot on this forum black Mr.Kettle?:banghead:


Kinda like where GW Staar says
IMO, even if one plans to only load 9mm pistol, having the bigger press, will insure you can change your mind, and become a reloading fanatic if you want to. If your press wears YOU out, that's less likely isn't it?

IMO= In my opinion!

So by your logic his statement wasn't "blanket" at all

Reading comprehension is FUNdamental

My issue is with your assertion that anyone who breaks one of those flimsy beginner presses (not just lee) is some kind of mechanically disinclined hamfist

possum
October 10, 2009, 10:08 PM
op,
the rock chucker that i have and have used for a while was once my dad's and between me and him it has been loading ammo for over 25 years maybe more.

i now have and use a lee turret press but that is not because the rock chucker dosen't work. oh no it is still good to go and i am sure that it will out last me and my dad.

whatnickname
October 11, 2009, 12:05 AM
I wouldn't even want to hazard a guess as to how many rounds I've loaded with this press. Tens of thousands to be sure. Never a problem...still works just fine. My guess is that this thing will outlast me. Who ever end up with it please take care of it. It's been a good press!

Steve Marshall
October 12, 2009, 12:14 AM
I'd like to thank the originator of this in person but my seconds disagree. Imagine, RCBS making something that needs cleaning and lubrication. Still, it was kind of sticky, so, after laughing derisively about Dextron and CLP and Breakfree etc., I thought why not? After 1/4 million+ rounds perhaps it wouldn't hurt to take a gander at the works. Well....... 4 rolls of bounty and several gallons of 91% alchohol, it was time to reassemble. No manual, ("we don't need no stinkin' manual"), but several screwdrivers, a small sledge and a tacticool bandage or two and it is back together. It is smoother than when new. Now, did we remember to lube when it was apart? Of course not. Did we put it together incorrectly several times? I'll leave it up to you. I mean, there are two spring washers and the small shaft and a c-clip. Did I mention that I had no need for the manual 30 or so years ago? And I didn't have a male role model growing up. So now I am looking for more reasonable seconds.
Of course if the original poster would be willing to compensate me for my 2 weeks of vacation, I may overlook things.

oldreloader
October 12, 2009, 12:26 AM
Steve if you want a manual for the old Rock Chucker,here is a link to one.
http://stevespages.com/pdf/rcbs_reloading_press_rockchucker.pdf

qajaq59
October 12, 2009, 05:23 AM
Steve if you want a manual for the old Rock Chucker,here is a link to one.
http://stevespages.com/pdf/rcbs_relo...ockchucker.pdf There's a surprise... Is there anything that cannot be found in the web?

GW Staar
October 13, 2009, 11:23 AM
There's a surprise... Is there anything that cannot be found in the web?

Absolutely nothing, but sometimes it is really hard to wade through all the fluff and misinformation to find the truth of a thing.:)

MetalHead
November 24, 2009, 11:26 AM
Friend of mine, gone five years now, wore a RCBS Jr sloppy, but he was a comercial loader and it was his main press for a while, figure thousands of rounds a week, month after month. He prolly loaded more ammo in a month than the average reloader will in a lifetime. Then he fell in love with Dillon.

Shimitup
November 24, 2009, 09:01 PM
I got my Rockchucker in 1979, 10's of 1000's of rounds later it works better than new, it's smoother.

Howard Roark
November 24, 2009, 09:31 PM
A fellow high power shooter that is retired has worn out a rockchucker press. The ram got sloppy in the frame. He also has worn out two .223 sizing dies. They opened up to the point that cases would not chamber when loaded. He shoots 25K rounds a year give or take a couple of rounds. He has also shot three barrels until the bullets would tumble at 100 yards. They had between 23K and 25K rounds through them. I love to shoot but not that much!

Someone said that LR matches are not won by ammo loaded on progressive presses. John Whidden has loaded every round he has shot since 2003 on a Dillon 650. (http://www.whiddengunworks.net/toolhead.html) He managed to win the LR Nationals twice, the Leech Cup, the Canadian Cup twice and is on the Palma team.

sargenv
November 24, 2009, 09:55 PM
Um, I've had my Rockchucker for.. 23 years now.. wow has it been that long? I FINALLY broke the primer arm...about 4 months ago. I called RCBS and they sent me a new one.

I've had my Dillon 650 for a bit over 12 years. I've replaced most of the wearable parts on it and keep thinking I might send it off to Dillon for a refurb but never get around to it.

The only press I've had longer in my Mec Sizemaster in 12 gauge, a year more than the RC.. and it still functions flawlessly. I think I've replaced the primer tray and the collet resizer.. oh and I just replaced the adjustable powder/shot bar.. It still loads shells like it did when I bought it way back when.

hydraulicman
November 24, 2009, 10:18 PM
rock chuckers don't wear out. They wear in:D

longone
November 25, 2009, 09:34 AM
Two rocks on my bench one was my grandpa's and the other and estate sale both look about the same ( early 80's ) and I keep the rams lubed and clean. 10's of 1000's and counting. I load 54 rifle & pistol calibers for myself, family, & buddies. I'm not sure I'll still be arround when my two finaly wearout.

sonier
November 25, 2009, 06:49 PM
i got a used rockchucker from the 80's its still running strong. now to think of it...........i think its starting to wrok even better. forget the thing getting worse its a rockchucker. only thing that happens in time is they get BETTER!

SharpsDressedMan
November 25, 2009, 11:20 PM
I'd like to meet the fella that wears out a rockchucker.....................

Shawn Dodson
November 25, 2009, 11:39 PM
While reloading last weekend I suddenly realized that it had been awhile since I'd performed any real maintenance on my RCBS presses. For the best part of the last two years they've been sitting in a cardboard box out in the garage (since moving from the Seattle area to Florida). I finally got my reloading room put together (after getting rid of a lot of clutter) and mounted the presses to a new reloading bench I'd just finished building.

In short, I "field stripped" my presses, wiped 'em down with a little bit of oil, applied grease to pivit pins, oiled other pivot points, a light coat of oil on the shaft, etc., and reassembled them. They feel and operate like new.

One is an ancient RCBS Reloader Special 2 that I got from my father for a birthday present about 30 years ago. The other is an RCBS Pro-2000 I bought about 10 years ago.

jw johnson
November 26, 2009, 02:44 AM
I have a Pacific Super Mag which was built in the 60's. It is my only press and works great. I just keep it clean and lubed. Never an issue.

sonier
November 26, 2009, 08:12 PM
The person who wears out a rockchucker, is in my list of HEROES

BigJakeJ1s
November 27, 2009, 11:10 PM
I suspect that "wearing out" a well built press has more to do with abuse and lack of maintenance than anything else. Having seen many a used press at gun shows with wobbly, rusty rams tends to support this theory.

Just from the recent chatter on the net though, it seems that the ram-to-press fit on recent vintage RCs (since being outsourced to China?) is not what it once was. And a sloppy original fit exacerbates wear more quickly.

Andy

qajaq59
November 28, 2009, 06:50 AM
I have a Herter stored out in the garage that's probably older then half the guys in here. And it's as good today as it was coming off the line. You just have to clean and lube them occasionally. Especially if you are putting them away for a while.

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