Autoloader question that's been on my mind


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20nickels
October 8, 2009, 04:17 PM
Is there or was there ever a pistol that automatically put the slide forward when a new magazine is inserted?
I just own wheelguns so brass chuckers are a bit foreign to me :p but one would think it would make a much quicker reload if the magazine would somehow disengage the slide catch when inserted. Or is there some safety issue with this?

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TRguy
October 8, 2009, 04:20 PM
I have a Bersa Thunder 380 that does it but it wasn't designed that way.

Toml
October 8, 2009, 04:24 PM
The slide on an H&K P7 is designed to move forward from slide-lock when the grip cocker is pressed.

BCRider
October 8, 2009, 04:27 PM
If I slap the mag home on my 1911 it drops the slide as well. I've also had this happen on occasion with my other semis if I slap the magazines home with a sharp action. But my 1911 does it the most consistently and predictably.

PO2Hammer
October 8, 2009, 04:37 PM
Older H&K USP's did that until people complained and the design was changed. Don't know if it was intentional or not.

Jim Watson
October 8, 2009, 04:38 PM
A lot of guns will, but it is a matter of fit or wear on the slide stop. I know Glockshooters who depend on it in IDPA competition.

I thought the Mauser HSc was built to, but W.H.B. Smith disagrees with me and I do not have one to study.

HammerBite
October 8, 2009, 05:17 PM
I thought the Mauser HSc was built to, but W.H.B. Smith disagrees with me and I do not have one to study.
My HSc closes the slide upon magazine insertion, as my owner's manual says it should.

NMGonzo
October 8, 2009, 05:23 PM
None of mine do it.

I tend to slingshot the thing.

tipoc
October 8, 2009, 05:47 PM
...one would think it would make a much quicker reload if the magazine would somehow disengage the slide catch when inserted

It would but the gain in speed is very minor, the blink of an eye or less, for a gain useful only in competitive shooting. If speed is the main concern than the hand that seats the mag simply continues on to depress the slide release. This method is nearly as fast and more sure, than automatic dropping of the slide. To me, not enough extra time is involved to worry about much. At least not for me.

Some designs that intentionally do this have been mentioned. Some guns do it unintentionally and some can be tweaked to do it, the Glock and 1911s for example.

Or is there some safety issue with this?

There are many gun designs out there and I can't speak to all of them. If you are considering modifying a gun to do this discuss it with a competent smith. With some designs there may be a very good reason not to.

Some shooters believe that the slingshot method of slide closure seats a round better than simply using the slide release to drop the slide. For them automatically dropping the slide when the mag is seated is not an option they want.

For me it's not an option I need given the guns I prefer.

tipoc

bannockburn
October 8, 2009, 06:06 PM
As previously mentioned, I had an H&K P7 and a Mauser HsC that both operated that way.

The Lone Haranguer
October 8, 2009, 06:28 PM
I've owned guns that did this, but I doubt it was an intentional design feature.

usp9
October 8, 2009, 07:45 PM
As previously mentioned, I had an H&K P7 ... that both operated that way.

The H&K P7 does not automatically close the slide upon slide insertion. You have to cause the slide to go forward.

HammerBite
October 8, 2009, 07:50 PM
From the H&K P7 manual:

As a third function, the cocking lever releases the slide catch when
the slide is locked to the rear. Moderate pressure on the cocking
lever is all that is needed to close the slide. This action will simultaneously
chamber a round if a loaded magazine has been inserted.

20nickels
October 8, 2009, 10:50 PM
I used to own a Glock 23 many yrs ago. The 1st time I slammed a magazine home I thought it was broke or needed break in to make the slide go automatically forward as the only auto (Glock) I shot prior to that did it. It has always intrigued me that this was not a standard or at least optional feature on most autos. Especially when I see new and newish shooters fumbling with the slide catch quite often.
Guess I was going with the simplicity "less is more" line of thought.

M2 Carbine
October 8, 2009, 11:32 PM
My HSc closes the slide upon magazine insertion, as my owner's manual says it should.
True, and I don't like the feature.

Jim Watson
October 9, 2009, 12:00 AM
My HSc closes the slide upon magazine insertion, as my owner's manual says it should.

Oh, good, I though I was remembering things that weren't so, because Smith didn't mention it.

rockstar.esq
October 12, 2009, 07:37 PM
I have a Taurus PT-92 that will only drop the slide if the gun is held at the right angle. Personally I think it's a fine way to go. For that matter I wouldn't much care if the mag fell out after the last shot was fired. Perhaps one better would be a selector switch on both functions to make all shooters happy. Frankly I'm somewhat stunned that last shot bolt hold open has existed for nearly 100 years but new guns come out all the time without this absolutely critical feature. The famous AK being a major example.

makarovnik
October 14, 2009, 03:34 AM
Sounds kind of dangerous to me.

Noveldoc
October 14, 2009, 08:04 PM
The M1 garand rifle quickly slams the bolt home when you push in a clip. Hence the phrase "G1 thumb".

Tom

AJChenMPH
October 14, 2009, 08:09 PM
I have a Bersa Thunder 380 that does it but it wasn't designed that way.
My Browning BDA-380 has done this exactly once...not sure why.

Drail
October 14, 2009, 08:14 PM
That's a little too automatic for me. I would rather not have it doing things I didn't intend for it to do. But then I hate things like automatic door locks on cars.

slicksleeve
October 14, 2009, 08:18 PM
My first Glock 22 would do it, I thought it was defective and had an extended slide release installed so it wouldn't. Then I got to accademy and they taught us that they just about always do it if you drive the mag in with force, ( such as a rapid combat reload). They also taught to never use the slide release, they said it is merely a slide stop. Were are taught to use our support hand to pull the slide back then let it go. I was said that that is a gross muscle movement instead of a fine muscle movement of using the thumb.

DanielW
October 14, 2009, 08:24 PM
My HK45 does it occasionally.

HoosierQ
October 14, 2009, 08:28 PM
My M&P .45 does that. I don't think it is supposed to...I know actually...but it doesn't seem to be a problem. I am not sending it back for that. Works great otherwise.

1SOW
October 14, 2009, 09:41 PM
My CZ75B slide releases with a quick mag insert.

The top bullet raises the slide just a skosh and releases the slide stop.

gyvel
October 15, 2009, 03:04 PM
Yes, in addition to the aforementioned Mauser HSc, the Mauser 1910 .25 ACP and 1914 .32 ACP also do it.

While a bit less common than the Mausers, the Webley and Scott .455 and .38 ACP self-loading pistols also do it.

Personally, I find it somewhat disconcerting and an AD waiting to happen.

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