Best way to cook a rabbit?


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BigMustard
October 16, 2009, 12:26 PM
I was wondering what the best way to cook a rabbit was? In the past all I have done is made a fire, stuck a stick through the rabbit and leaned it near the fire. I know it's primitive, but it gets the job done. There's got to be a better way right?

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Rodeo4joe
October 16, 2009, 12:29 PM
For me it's deep frying.

rcmodel
October 16, 2009, 12:46 PM
Just like Fried chicken exactly.

Or, you can put the meat in a sealed zip-lock bag.
Place in a large bowl.
Cover the bag with Jack Danial's overnight.
The following day, throw the zip-lock bag away.
Drink the marinade with ice & Coke.

rc

ArmedBear
October 16, 2009, 12:54 PM
ROTFLMAO

When I've cooked rabbit, it's tasted good, but had the toughness of a boot sole. I don't mean leather or soft rubber, I mean a Vibram boot sole.

Fortunately, our pit bull loves to eat, and had no trouble chewing through it. Even ate the bones.:D

BigMustard
October 16, 2009, 12:55 PM
I never thought about frying them. rcmodel, was that a joke? Or does the Jack D somehow seep through the bag?

tjj
October 16, 2009, 01:06 PM
rabbit spaghetti or rabbit stew

1KPerDay
October 16, 2009, 01:19 PM
Or, you can put the meat in a sealed zip-lock bag.
Place in a large bowl.
Cover the bag with Jack Danial's overnight.
The following day, throw the zip-lock bag away.
Drink the marinade with ice & Coke.

HHAAAAAAaaaa!!! :D

nathan
October 16, 2009, 01:28 PM
Rabbit meat stew. Marinate 8 hrs in lemon and soy sauce , salt and crushed peppercorn, garlic and ginger to take out the wild smell .

Place in hot pot and pour everything. Place one bayleaf to add flavor and aroma. Boil and simmer at medium heat . Cover with lid until fully cooked as juice evaporate.

Great to eat the day after . Reheat in microwave . Nice to go wtih rice and bread.

61chalk
October 16, 2009, 01:35 PM
Pan fried or crock pot for a few hours with your favorite seasonings...falls right off the bone.

kanook
October 16, 2009, 01:38 PM
Slow smoke cook using lemon juice and 1/2 can of beer to keep moist.

fourdollarbill
October 16, 2009, 01:40 PM
If your cooking away from home in the woods I wrap it in alum foil leaving enough room for steam to cook it. Lay it on a rock in the fire and the foil will expand with steam to a small foot ball shape. Leave it in a while and then enjoy. Hopefully you brought salt.

One good reason to hand roll foil and keep it in your pack.

rcmodel
October 16, 2009, 01:40 PM
I never thought about frying them. rcmodel, was that a joke?No, it was not a joke. The other part about the Black Jack D was a joke.

As a boy, my family ate fried cottontail rabbit at least once a week all winter.
My mother prepared and cooked it exactly like fried chicken, and it was mighty good!

Jack rabbits on the otherhand are tougher then a boot after maturity, and we considered them unfit for human consumption.
We had a jack rabbit plague in the late 50's here in Kansas.
So many jacks they were eating our winter wheat fields bare. My dad bought me all the .22 shells I could shoot, and every evening when I got home from school I went and shot jack rabbits until it got too dark to see them.
Dad would come with the tractor and haul them in and feed them to the hogs.

We even had jack rabbit drives, and all the farmers would gather on someones farm and drive them into a fenced-off corner, then beat them to death with clubs!

The county paid .10 cents a pair of ears as bounty!

http://www.kshs.org/portraits/jackrabbit_drives.htm

About 1960 they got some sort of disease and every last one of them died off that winter.
Stiil very rare to see a jack rabbit around here today.

rc

ArmedBear
October 16, 2009, 01:43 PM
Jack rabbits on the otherhand are tougher then a boot after maturity, and we considered them unfit for human consumption.

Stew. Apparently the Navajo know how to make an excellent stew. It has to simmer all day, but the sage taste comes out and everything.

BigMustard
October 16, 2009, 02:46 PM
No, it was not a joke. The other part about the Black Jack D was a joke.

As a boy, my family ate fried cottontail rabbit at least once a week all winter.
My mother prepared and cooked it exactly like fried chicken, and it was mighty good!

Jack rabbits on the otherhand are tougher then a boot after maturity, and we considered them unfit for human consumption.
We had a jack rabbit plague in the late 50's here in Kansas.
So many jacks they were eating our winter wheat fields bare. My dad bought me all the .22 shells I could shoot, and every evening when I got home from school I went and shot jack rabbits until it got too dark to see them.
Dad would come with the tractor and haul them in and feed them to the hogs.

We even had jack rabbit drives, and all the farmers would gather on someones farm and drive them into a fenced-off corner, then beat them to death with clubs!

The county paid .10 cents a pair of ears as bounty!

http://www.kshs.org/portraits/jackrabbit_drives.htm

About 1960 they got some sort of disease and every last one of them died off that winter.
Stiil very rare to see a jack rabbit around here today.

rc

Looks like ya learn something new everyday. That's incredible. I'm going to have to try the foil trick next time I head down to the ranch. Maybe I'll bring one back and fry it :)

inclinebench
October 16, 2009, 03:28 PM
Quarter it, and put it in a deep pot with minced garlic and diced onions some creole seasoning, and any other spices you would like. Brown it, then add a half cup of halved green olives then a cup of rice, and two cups of water, and cook like you would do rice (bring to a boil, then turn down heat to simmer). That is fine eating. You can also remove the meat from the bone before cooking to make it easier to eat, but when no one else is around, I eat the rabbit by holding the bone, just like chicken.

Frying them, pan or deep, is also always good. I like to roll them in seasoned flour before frying. I have never tried dipping in batter before frying, but some folks swear by it.

qajaq59
October 16, 2009, 04:06 PM
I have a recipe from friends in LA that sound much like Inclinebench's except you use wine instead of water. And it is delicious

Arkansas Paul
October 16, 2009, 04:38 PM
I'm from the south, we fry everything. That's probably not a good thing, but to me you just can't beat pan fried rabbit.

desidog
October 16, 2009, 05:05 PM
I think the best way is to get a standard recipe for Osso Bucco and subsitute the veal-shank with rabbit-quarter.

Kernel
October 16, 2009, 05:12 PM
Old fashion pressure cooker.

hammerklavier
October 16, 2009, 05:14 PM
I want my Hossenpfeffer! Bring me my Hossenpfeffer!

Friendly, Don't Fire!
October 16, 2009, 05:15 PM
Shoot it with a S&W 500 Magnum. :eek:

retsub
October 17, 2009, 01:38 AM
It was tradition at my uncles camp the night before buck season to have rabbits and squirrels roasted with prunes and raisins. He used to put the quartered critters in a roaster just covered with water with a bunch of raisins and prunes and roast them until they start to fall apart. Use the juice on boiled potatoes.

Mmmmmm......

Nematocyst
October 17, 2009, 01:48 AM
Stiil very rare to see a jack rabbit around here today.19 trillion of them moved to eastern Oregon.
The other 53 trillion are in other western states.

Stew. Apparently the Navajo know how to make an excellent stew.
It has to simmer all day, but the sage taste comes out and everything.Zuni Jackrabbit Stew. (http://www.recipezaar.com/Zuni-Jackrabbit-Stew-73321)

Marlin 45 carbine
October 17, 2009, 05:29 AM
clean the hare well removing the lymph gland at the leg junction and section.
place in a heavy pot w/a tight lid and seasonings, just enough water to cover and simmer for 1&1/2 hr.
make dumpling batter with some of the broth and add to pot, cover and simmer another 20 mins.
if youhave 2 or more hares when you remove broth to make dumpling add to the pot a small can of condensed cream of mushroom soup and 1/2 can liquid and stir then add dumpling.

Sav .250
October 17, 2009, 07:13 AM
Lots of different ways but one thing is for sure.......make sure it`s, cooked!

MCgunner
October 17, 2009, 10:46 AM
Young cottontail, fried. Big swamp rabbits, either smothered or in stew. Young cottontail are tender and fry well.

Can't tell ya about Jacks. Never tried to eat one. We don't have any Jacks here, but west Texas and New Mexico are ate up with 'em.

bubba15301
October 17, 2009, 01:43 PM
shake and bake or make rabbit stew

SomeDude
October 17, 2009, 01:49 PM
Nobody's had rabbit pie? My grandma used to make it for me all the time. Don't know the exact formula but it was rabbit meat with some kind of gravy put in a baking pan with biscuits baked on top of it. Phenomal. I need to call my grandma.

nathan
October 17, 2009, 02:47 PM
And if u are in the camp or survival mode, skinned and cleaned the guts out. Cut in half lengthwise along spine. Then stick a long stick for BBQ. Rub salt and pepper and grill to perfection over hot amber or coal. With cold beer , u have a wonderful experience underneath that starry night exchanging stories of hunting and life.

Peakbagger46
October 22, 2009, 02:29 AM
I take all the meat off the bones, cut it up, and soak in salt water for a couple of days in the fridge. Then its time for rabbit stirfry!

jim147
October 23, 2009, 12:29 AM
Nobody's had rabbit pie? My grandma used to make it for me all the time. Don't know the exact formula but it was rabbit meat with some kind of gravy put in a baking pan with biscuits baked on top of it. Phenomal. I need to call my grandma.

I saved that for the old red squirrels. Boil them down and thicken the stock.

I see if I ever get a chance to visit my old friend in Perry, Ks I need to stop on the way with a bit of fried rabbit and Jack.

jim

dagger dog
October 23, 2009, 08:14 PM
Hey Grandpa what's for dinner?

Hassenpfeffer with kartoffelpuree, (or better known as rabbit with mashed potatoes),rabbit marinated in wine and spices ,then dredged in seasoned flour and fried in a hot cast iron skillet until golden brown, the remainder of the marinade stirred into a flour and butter rue, to make a sauce ( gravy to us hillbillys) to ladle over the heaping plate of butter infused mashed potatoes,with a liter dopplebock bier to wash it all down. YUM YUM!

Daveboone
October 23, 2009, 08:16 PM
Shake and bake works great, either in the oven or deep fried.

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