Redding Equipment


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chagasrod
October 24, 2009, 03:25 PM
Are the products from Redding good stuff?
I noticed that some if not all are made of cast iron instead of Alloy like my Loadmaster.

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bigeye
October 24, 2009, 03:31 PM
Redding is what I have slowly replaced all my reloading equipment with. They have a good product and excellent service (at least with me).

something vague
October 24, 2009, 05:45 PM
Great stuff. But it does depend on what product exactly you're looking at. I have all different colors of tools as each one has something I prefer over the competition. I will say that Redding's quality control is usually right at the top of the list. Sometimes I don't always like the design of certain products, but again this is for all brands.

rfwobbly
October 24, 2009, 05:53 PM
Redding is top-of-the-line stuff. They make their presses out of iron for stability and longevity. Watch the video on UnlimitedReloader and you'll see. You just don't hear much from them because they concentrate on high accuracy rifle reloading and have not chased the progressive press pistol reloading market.

rcmodel
October 24, 2009, 05:58 PM
Cast iron has long been the preferred material for making heavy-duty press frames that are expected to last forever without breaking or wearing out.

Aluminum alloy has traditionally been used by the major reloading equipment manufactures for light duty equipment built for low price-point sales.

rc

mallc
October 24, 2009, 06:32 PM
I too have slowly upgraded to Redding dies and my T7 is a real workhorse. If you appreciate fit and finish, you can't beat Redding.

They advertise that it's 100% MADE IN AMERICAN on AMERICAN MADE MACHINE TOOLS! I for one, will pay a few dollars more to help keep AMERICA working.

Scott

ranger335v
October 24, 2009, 06:47 PM
"Aluminum alloy has traditionally been used by the major reloading equipment manufactures for light duty equipment built for low price-point sales."

I have no experience with Dillon's expensive progressive presses. Are they cast iron?

I know Lee's Classic Turret has a cast steel body and a milled alum alloy turret design.

Walkalong
October 24, 2009, 06:49 PM
Redding makes very good reloading equipment. No problem there.

Grumulkin
October 24, 2009, 06:57 PM
I love my T-7.

I very much dislike my Redding case trimmer. The cutter heads are expensive and not that durable. In fact, the whole trimmer is expensive and not that durable.

Redding dies are pretty much what I buy now. I had problems with one that the threads weren't right on but it was promptly replaced.

I think Redding has had a problem with quality control but most of their stuff is good except for the trimmer.

ClarkEMyers
October 24, 2009, 07:06 PM
Redding is as good as any and better than most.

I have more Redding than any other brand and far and away more money in Redding with their Type S and Competition Micrometer and Instant Indicator with dial indicator and other pricey gear than I do in other brands - though a couple sets of carbide 9x23 and 9x23 Nowlin and such from RCBS add up - again not necessary a 9x19 sizing die works for 9x23 but again nice to have.

I could shoot happily for the rest of my life with nothing but RCBS or nothing but Hornady or nothing but Lyman if somebody offered to make any particular brand all free to me though.

That said it always advisable to match equipment and needs - whether it's a Lyman Type M expander or a Lee Loader or a Dillon Super 1050 there will be a particular piece of equipment that is the best choice for a particular need and it may come from any given maker.

I like the Forster/Bonanza CoAx for a single stage press but I also have an aluminum press that is in no way inferior - for its intended purpose of loading at the range and carrying it around

Frex:
Harrell's Precision Compact Loading Press
Our Reloading Presses are precision machined from solid 6061 aluminum stock and come in 3 sizes to suit your needs.
The PPC size will resize the PPC, BR and shorter cases.
The 308 size will resize the 308 or shorter cases.
The Mag size will resize up to 2.9" cases and seat bullets. They all use standard RCBS type shell holders.
PRICE $160

For getting into the super size African Rifle and Black Powder cartridges to say nothing of the .50 Browning Machine Gun I have a Hollywood Universal Turret with its 4 position priming post turret dating to the days of domed and flat primers but that's just because Elmer Keith once said it was the best and 40 years later when I could finally afford one I bought one to have more than to use.

It's all good and getting better.

UltimateReloader
October 24, 2009, 07:23 PM
Hey chagasrod- I too am a fan of Redding equipment. If you are interested in the T-7 turret, I have a collection of free HD videos of the Redding T7 on my website, click here:
http://ultimatereloader.com/?p=461
(There's a total of 8 videos in that category, just click on the links on the left-side navigation pane)

I show some interesting procedures, including using the Hornady Lock-N-Load case activated powder measure to load pistol ammo. Let me know what you think.

Screenshot of video:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2714/4041017962_1c37e19a13_o.jpg

Hope that's helpful.

PO2Hammer
October 24, 2009, 08:27 PM
Top quality stuff, especially happy with the T-7 and their competition seater dies. Redding claims all the equipment is made in America from American castings on American made tooling.

billybob44
October 24, 2009, 08:50 PM
"Aluminum alloy has traditionally been used by the major reloading equipment manufactures for light duty equipment built for low price-point sales."

I have no experience with Dillon's expensive progressive presses. Are they cast iron?

I know Lee's Classic Turret has a cast steel body and a milled alum alloy turret design.
My Dillon 550 is alum. alloy. As large as it is, the average person could not lift it, if it was cast iron?? The ram, lever, and all pins are steel, and fitted correctly, for no free play, and it works well.

loadedround
October 24, 2009, 10:06 PM
I have always preached here that Redding manufactures the highest quality dies that you can buy. Almost all my dies are now Redding with the the exception of the pistol died used on my Dillon 550. I also have a Redding Boss press used for small quantities of rifle ammo that's still as solid as the day it came here to live.

Rokman
October 25, 2009, 01:00 PM
Yes! I really like their dies and I have one of their case trimmers that has served me well.

mallc
October 25, 2009, 01:08 PM
How DO you keep that press so clean?? It looks like its never been used?

Scott

ForneyRider
October 25, 2009, 01:34 PM
I use Redding match bushing and standard dies and some brass prep tools like primer pocket uniformer, flash hole debur, etc.

One die had threads disintegrate but I just wiped it off and went on my way.

T-7 looks great but is $240. I can get Loadmaster for that much with dies, powder measure, and progressive advance. So my fancy dies still go on Lee single stage.

Redding has a tool to measure runout on the brass but no neck turning tools. They don't cover as wide a spectrum of tools as RCBS or Lyman.

mallc
October 25, 2009, 08:06 PM
T-7 looks great but is $240. I can get Loadmaster for that much with dies, powder measure, and progressive advance. So my fancy dies still go on Lee single stage.

IMHO the T7 is worth $240. I get my money's worth on piece of Redding gear I buy.

You get your money's worth with LEE as well. LEE just doesn't cost as much.

Scott

Bruno2
October 25, 2009, 09:25 PM
Reddings FL bushing dies are what somebody that doesnt like run out needs to have in his tool box .

Sport45
October 26, 2009, 12:41 AM
One die had threads disintegrate but I just wiped it off and went on my way.

Can you elaborate please? Did the 7/8-14 threads on the outside of a Redding die body strip off?

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