Is Lake City M1 carbine ammo reloadable?


PDA






foudufoot
October 26, 2009, 09:04 PM
I bought 800 rounds of this ammo, thinking it was reloadable, but the case is silver and doesn't look like brass. Is it reloadable? Thanks. Dan

If you enjoyed reading about "Is Lake City M1 carbine ammo reloadable?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Maj Dad
October 26, 2009, 09:12 PM
If that is a pic of your ammo, it is (cartridge brass can have varied looks, just like any metal). There was some CHICOM carbine ammo around a bunch of years ago headstamped LC 52 and berdan primed. I have never seen it in person, but have seen pics & read about it. The LC 72 GI ammo I got from CMP is on strippers & not boxes; what is yours headstamped?

fatelk
October 26, 2009, 09:16 PM
Looks like the old steel case carbine ammo. Other than steel cases, it will be non-corrosive and boxer primed. Yes, it's reloadable just like the brass stuff, but most people don't reload it. It can rust, it won't last as many loadings, and be sure to lube it good before sizing it.

What is the year on the headstamp? IIRC, steel case ammo was produced during the Korean war, but used for training only. I don't know how collectible it is, but you might check that angle out before shooting it up.

ReloaderFred
October 26, 2009, 09:35 PM
Put a magnet to them and see if they're steel. If not, then they're what was called "stannic stained", and were originally intended for "test" or "proof" rounds. Those rounds were loaded with a standard Spitzer M2 bullet (150 +/-2 gr.). Those were never released to the public, since they were loaded to a pressure of almost 50,000 psi, and were intended for testing guns at the armory.

Your rounds aren't Test Rounds, but could have been loaded with excess stannic stained cases, though I doubt it. They're probably something else, but a clear picture of the headstamp would at least tell what year they were manufactured.

Hope this helps.

Fred

foudufoot
October 27, 2009, 09:01 PM
Thanks guys. The head stamps read L C 54. Let me know if that tells you anything more. Dan

ReloaderFred
October 28, 2009, 12:56 AM
Only that it was made at Lake City Arsenal in 1954. Did you test the cases with a magnet?

Fred

ants
October 28, 2009, 05:42 AM
Wouldn't one of them dang cartridge collectors pay you 50 bucks for that box? Then you could buy two or three boxes of modern brass 30 M1 Carbine ammo, and after you shot them you can reload 'em til you're exhausted.

fatelk
October 28, 2009, 01:46 PM
If the case is not magnetic, I think Fred has it exactly right.

I was certain that I had a steel cased carbine round, but I looked through my collection and all I could find were a few of the stannic cases.

The carbine rounds in the photo are all dummies dated 1944, except the high pressure round which is 1952, and all are WRA and non-magnetic. Also in the photo are some steel case .45 rounds (pretty common).

I'm not a serious collector, but I've accumulated a lot of oddball stuff over the years. Definitely check out the collector angle before shooting them up. You might be money ahead to sell them.

GRIZ22
October 28, 2009, 02:33 PM
There was some CHICOM carbine ammo around a bunch of years ago headstamped LC 52 and berdan primed.

I had some of that in the early 90s. All of it was headstamped LC52 as far as I know. It shot well and not knowing if it was corrosive primed (it is) I cleaned properly and I had no issues with it.

My understanding is that ammo was made to clandestinely resupply communist guerillas in the Phillipines that had captured M1 carbines. The Chicoms overlooked the fact that they had used berdan primers but I don't know if any of the ammo ever made it to the Phillipines.

foudufoot
October 29, 2009, 06:59 PM
Cases are magnetic. Looks like it's steel-cased ammo..

Thanks for all the input. Dan :)

ReloaderFred
October 29, 2009, 10:13 PM
Mystery solved!

Good observation, Fatelk.

Fred

If you enjoyed reading about "Is Lake City M1 carbine ammo reloadable?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!