Umm derrrrr how do you pronounce "Mosin Nagant"?


PDA






WonderNine
November 5, 2003, 09:32 AM
Anyone tell me?

If you enjoyed reading about "Umm derrrrr how do you pronounce "Mosin Nagant"?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
OEF_VET
November 5, 2003, 09:39 AM
After I bought my M-44, I did a significant amount of reading on the subject, and found somewhere that it is properly pronounced Moe-seen Nah-gahnt. Mosin was a Belgin and Nagant was a Russian, and with my limited understanding of French, this sounds about right.

Of course, I might very well be wrong. That happened once before.

Frank

MuzzleBlast
November 5, 2003, 10:54 AM
Sorry, but you have that backward: Mosin was the Russian and Nagant was the Belgian.

mo-SEEN na-GAW is my best guess.

Dave R
November 5, 2003, 11:30 AM
I thought is was "Noisy Magnet".

Andrew Wyatt
November 5, 2003, 12:40 PM
moh-zin na-gaunt

Bainx
November 5, 2003, 12:46 PM
Well, I'm from Rocky Top and we say "Mozun Naggat".:D

MonkeyMan
November 5, 2003, 12:59 PM
I can't tell you how to pronounce it, but I can tell you it translates from the Russian to:

Emptier of bank account, or, maximizer of credit limit.

:what:

Proceed with caution.

PS, their favorite breeding place is in a dark, cool, gun safe.:D

Mike Irwin
November 5, 2003, 01:52 PM
You'll also see a lot of variation in the spelling of Moisin if you go back over the years in any number of magazines.

Mosin, Moisin, Mossin, Moisen, etc. Moisin seems to be the one that's accepted right now.

Lots of debate about which is correct...

Quite frankly, they all are, and none are.

Russia uses the Cyrillic alphabet, while we use the Latin alphabet.

To get from one to the other, you have to transliterate, and transliteration is always open to interpretation.

Joe Demko
November 5, 2003, 02:44 PM
I thought it was pronounced "My hovercraft is full of eels."

4v50 Gary
November 5, 2003, 02:48 PM
Golgo - "My hovercraft is full of eels"
:D :D :D :D :D

Mike Irwin
November 5, 2003, 02:53 PM
"I thought it was pronounced "My hovercraft is full of eels."

No no no!

That's how a Cockney from Orkney says SMLE...

Or at least that's what it sounds like through the scones...

Cosmoline
November 5, 2003, 02:53 PM
No, no. It's spelt "mosin nagant," but it's pronounced throat warbler mangrove :D

Chipperman
November 5, 2003, 04:14 PM
You're a very silly person, and I'm not going to interview you!

OEF_VET
November 5, 2003, 04:25 PM
MuzzleBlast, thanks for the correction. It's been awhile since I looked it up and I got it backwards. Either way, the two of them created an evil rifle that seems to drain money from the bank accounts of their innocent owners.

Okiecruffler
November 5, 2003, 04:28 PM
But everytime I shoot it, my nipples explode with delight.

OEF_VET
November 5, 2003, 04:33 PM
Okie, that's wayyyyy too much info.

Mike Irwin
November 5, 2003, 04:54 PM
"But everytime I shoot it, my nipples explode with delight."

There's an image that's going to haunt me for a long, long time...

Sleeping Dog
November 5, 2003, 05:16 PM
There's an image that's going to haunt me for a long, long time...

Agree, but somehow I want to grab the M44 and head for the range. I thought it was only a sound and light show. Hmmmm.

Oh yeah, the names

I'd go for "MOY-seen" and "NAH-ganh"

Daniel T
November 5, 2003, 06:15 PM
Shooting a Mosin-Nagant might make nipples do odd things, but my shoulder aches too much from my M44 for me to notice. :D

Frohickey
November 5, 2003, 06:30 PM
Moist Nuggat. ;)

ShaiVong
November 5, 2003, 06:36 PM
I like to go with a blunt Boston accent: Mo-zin Na-Jant

Dave R
November 5, 2003, 08:35 PM
Bottom line--no one knows. Pick one and enjoy.

Gewehr98
November 5, 2003, 09:46 PM
"moosey nugget"

;)

Mike Irwin
November 5, 2003, 10:14 PM
"Bottom line--no one knows. Pick one and enjoy."

Uhm... Actually yeah, but you have to ask two separate people.

Since Moisin is a Russian word, you ask a native speaker to pronounce it for you. I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier, but I work with three people who over the years got out of the Soviet Union. One of them is going to know how to spell it and say it.

Since Nagant was Belgian, and came from the French speaking section of Belgium, the most likely pronunciations would either be NAH-gan or NAH-gant.

7.62FullMetalJacket
November 5, 2003, 10:30 PM
moist noggin?

max popenker
November 6, 2003, 12:56 AM
Well, being a Russian, i can at lest try to transliterate it for you :cool:

It is definely NOT Mo-zeen, the "s" is prononced softly. I think that closest will be Mos-in, with stress on "o". "Mos" is prononced like "Moscow" or "Most" :cool: , "in" - just like your ordinary "in the safe" :D

Nagant is pronounced like "Nah-gun", with sthress on "gun" ;)

Dave R
November 6, 2003, 01:06 AM
Thank you, Max. Its nice to hear from someone who knows.

Dionysusigma
November 6, 2003, 02:53 AM
MOH-sin na-GAHNT

is how I incorrectly pronounce it.

Also see:

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!!! Whee!!!

;)

skynyrd1911
November 6, 2003, 08:07 AM
Russian Rifle :D

foghornl
November 6, 2003, 12:19 PM
Noisy Magnet...:D :D :D :D

Starpower
November 7, 2003, 09:05 AM
You guys are a riot!! LMAO! :D :D I don't think it really matters. At dealers and gun shows when you ask somebody about it, saying it your way, invariably they answer, "Oh, you mean......?" and then they say it a different way. Maybe we could get Norm Crosby to give us his official misingliteration and then everybody use that!

geojap
November 7, 2003, 10:24 AM
Per Terrance Lapin's book, The Mosin Nagant Rifle:

Mosin is pronounced mo-SEEN by the rooskies.

Nagant is pronounced na-GOHN by french speakers (including Belgians like Nagant). The second sylable GOHN has a very nasal quality to it and the ending "T" is silent.

The corruption of the word into "Moisin" (Moy-zin) by some Americans is entirely incorrect to the original pronunciation.

The development of the rifle is pretty interesting. IIRC, The Belgian Nagant's rifle may have had the overall superior design, as it was selected by the army in the side-by-side test against Mosin's rifle. After the army's Nagant recommendation, Mosin's rifle was chosen by the politicians for nationalistic reasons (it needed to be made by a Russian). The end result was a rifle that was mostly Mosin's design, with the magazine and feeding design (and one other part, possibly the bolt, but I can't remember) being Nagant's design.

The Finns really made it into a modern rifle that is still a fine rifle today with their M39 design. I have a half dozen of the M39's and I love them to death.

Ironbarr
December 7, 2003, 07:36 PM
I'm coming here from the future - "Contributions Please! THR Library Update" http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?s=&threadid=53039, where this thread is a link for "proper :rolleyes: :D :D pronunciation" of Mosin Nagent.

Now that I'm here - and have gained the exposure to this pronunciation, I must offer my version - somewhat simplified, it tends to ease the strain of remembering all these other versions:

Emenen - er... Emen? M & N?

Whatever.

:) -Andy

Houndawg
December 8, 2003, 03:03 AM
Moe-sin Nay-Gant

Moparmike
December 8, 2003, 04:43 AM
"My hovercraft is full of eels."No no no!!! It is pronounced: "Please foouundle, mah buttocckkkks." :D :D :D

Okie, that was so obscure that I didnt get it until I googled.

"In 1970, the British Empire lay in ruins, and foreign nationalists frequented the streets - many of them Hungarian (not the streets - the foreign nationals). Anyway, many of these Hungarians went into tobacconists' shops to buy cigarettes ..." (http://www.thisisawar.com/LaughterMPHungarian.htm):D :neener:

BigG
December 8, 2003, 08:56 AM
Did you leave out an "i?" I always thought is was Moisin, like poison.

geojap
December 8, 2003, 09:46 AM
In my post above, "The corruption of the word into "Moisin" (Moy-zin) by some Americans is entirely incorrect to the original pronunciation."

In Austin we have a street called Koenig lane. It's the German word for king. It's meant to be pronounced "ker-nig" in German. But, the Austinites say it "cay-nig". Manchaca (it looks like a Czech word but I don't know) is said "mann-check". It seems to me that Americans love to reeealllllly stretch the pronunciation of foreign words.

BigG
December 8, 2003, 10:00 AM
Geojap said: It seems to me that Americans love to reeealllllly stretch the pronunciation of foreign words.

Yep, we do. And who cares what the furrins think? They all are trying to get here. ;)

It reminds me of my dad telling he fought in the Voz-Geez mountains of France. I mentioned it to a young French person who scoffed at the miserable mispronunciation of the Voshe Mountains. I didn't mention it, but thought the dunderhead would have sang a different tune if it were now called something in German. :cuss:

geojap
December 8, 2003, 10:36 AM
Ha! So true.

I get into "word nazi" pronunciation discussions with lots of folks around here. I really don't care how a word is pronounced as long as I understand the meaning. Indignant, myopic, Spanish speakers here in Texas (and elsewhere) love to correct me and others when we say a spanish word with an american accent. They say, "Noh Jaysson, eetz Coo-bah, not Cue-bah." Referring to the Island Cuba. And it goes on and on with words like cuartito and en-CHI-la-dass and carrrrr-ne (you gotta roll your R's in spanish). I respond, "Oh yeah, you word-nazi, how do you say Munich, Germany?" Because they invariably pronounce it "Mu-nick" like all Americans, but it's correctly said, "Meun-shen" and correctly spelled Muenchen. How do you say Paris, which is pronounced "pah-REE"? You'd sound like a flaming nancy-boy if you said, "pah-ree" all the time. So every pronunciation-Nazi has their own downfall.

BigG
December 8, 2003, 10:41 AM
Every pronunciation nazi has their downfall. You said it, bro. We had an hispanic lady reporter in AZ and she spoke dead flat English until she pronounced her name: Leenda Ahlvahrez. I was not impressed. :rolleyes:

Bill Hook
December 8, 2003, 12:04 PM
We had an hispanic lady reporter in AZ and she spoke dead flat English until she pronounced her name: Leenda Ahlvahrez. I was not impressed.

Wasn't there a TV show where they made fun of this phenomenon? "Married with Children," prehaps?

Smokey Joe
December 8, 2003, 02:38 PM
Gewehr98: A "Moosey Nugget" is something found in vast quantities in Maine, Isle Royale National Park, northern Minnesota, Alaska, and vast areas of Canada. They are related to road apples and pasture pies. I absolutely GUARANTEE that you do not want to pick one up and put it to your shoulder! :D :D

Ironbarr
December 8, 2003, 03:26 PM
now there's a new one on me... don't worry - I can SWAG it pretty close.

Never too old to learn, huh?:D

-Andy

Cosmoline
December 8, 2003, 04:53 PM
Interestingly enough, I have used frozen Moose nuggets as plinking targets for my Mosin Nagants.

The REAL sourdoughs will eat 'em.

Okiecruffler
December 8, 2003, 06:01 PM
This thread just keeps getting worse and worse.

Kalos
December 8, 2003, 06:35 PM
Since Moisin is a Russian word, you ask a native speaker to pronounce it for you. I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier, but I work with three people who over the years got out of the Soviet Union. One of them is going to know how to spell it and say it.

Since Nagant was Belgian, and came from the French speaking section of Belgium, the most likely pronunciations would either be NAH-gan or NAH-gant.

Say... since it's actually a Russian rifle, wouldn't the proper pronounciation (in this case) of Nagant be however the Russians happened to (mis)pronounce it?

Just a thought... :evil:

Erik Jensen
December 8, 2003, 06:39 PM
I respond, "Oh yeah, you word-nazi, how do you say Munich, Germany?" Because they invariably pronounce it "Mu-nick" like all Americans, but it's correctly said, "Meun-shen" and correctly spelled Muenchen.

well, you got the pronounciation right, but it's spelled München. (wow, I hope this site recognises ümlauts...)

geojap
December 8, 2003, 07:44 PM
If you can't write the umlaut, you put an "e" after the vowel. They probably made that rule to accomodate typewriters and such that don't have the umlaut. It's a German grammar rule. So "King" is spelled "Konig" in German, but the O has an umlaut. I don't know how to do your neat little trick in your post with the umlaut, so the correct way to spell it without the umlaut over the "o" is Koenig. Same for Munchen (with Umlaut over the "u")/Muenchen (without).

Erik Jensen
December 8, 2003, 08:34 PM
es machts nichts. I'm just being difficult. :D I use the US International keyboard setting for no other reason than I can do ümlauts quickly and easily. and ñ, and ç, etc...... :-P

geojap
December 8, 2003, 11:33 PM
Alles klar. Ich habe in Deutchland fur elf jahre gewohnt and I know a bit of German. But I've forgotten most of what I did know.

Okiecruffler
December 9, 2003, 08:57 AM
I really like german beer, and I know enough spanish to start a fight.

Erik Jensen
December 9, 2003, 05:19 PM
geojap

yeah, I was in Stuttgart for 7 years, myself. with no-one to practice the language with, it goes away faster than I'd like.

Cosmoline
December 9, 2003, 05:42 PM
Arghh! We're being invaded by zee Germans!

Where's my rifle?

geojap
December 9, 2003, 06:53 PM
In the late 80's there were about 2.5 million americans living in Germany alone: all the soldiers, dependents and civilian workers. So you can't hardly go anywhere without meeting someone who hasn't lived in Europe or Asia because of the NATO (or other defense treaty) bases we have overseas.

I lived there for 11 years, until I was about 23. Great experience but I was very glad to move back to the USA finally. I was never able to enjoy a firearm collection over there. I doubt I'd ever move to another country for too long now because I'd have to give up my C&R's.

If you enjoyed reading about "Umm derrrrr how do you pronounce "Mosin Nagant"?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!