Chronograph recommendations?


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Oyeboten
October 30, 2009, 12:00 AM
I would like to have a Chronograph for Hand Gun Bullet Velocity measuring.


Any recommendations for Brand and Model you find to be 'user-friendly' and reliable?


I will be seeking a used one, most likely, via the 'e-bay' way of faith...or, via our own Buy-and-Section, here.

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Steve C
October 30, 2009, 12:58 AM
IMO FWIW the less expensive chronographs like the Shooting Chrony F1 at around $80 and the ProChrono at a tad over $100 measure velocity as well as the more expensive ones that run $200+. The difference is mostly the bells and whistles like remote readout, and laptop connector or printer. I'm quite happy using a basic model and recording the data on paper with pencil to enter the data into a spread sheet later to crunch the numbers. While my chrono will read out SD, ES, and Average velocity for a 10 shot string I'd just as soon have the numbers generated by Xcel.

The chrono you choose depends more on how deep you pocketbook is and if the features of the model fit your needs.

mongoose33
October 30, 2009, 01:10 AM
I have the Competition Electronics ProChrono. Works fine.

If I had to do it over again, I'd probably get one that either had a remote or a printer, perhaps both. But in the end that's a price issue as much as anything else.

Oyeboten
October 30, 2009, 04:24 AM
Thank you both...


I've never been around one in use...never been around one in any way at all, ever, to have had any introduction whatever.


So...I feel totally out of the loop on this.

Bailey Boat
October 30, 2009, 08:22 AM
I have a ProChrono with none of the remote accessories and don't miss them one bit. I manually record my data after a string of shots. That lets me and the gun calm down, cool down and change a target if needed.
Absolutely invaluable if you're developing loads. The problem with having a chrono is that you'll find yourself making excuses for load development because it's much more fun when you know all the info. Now if someone would just come up with something reasonably priced to measure pressures I'd be as happy as a pig in mud.......

Galil5.56
October 30, 2009, 08:25 AM
After owning two Shooting Chrony's, and now own a ProChrono Digital, I would never get a SC again. The PCD simply works well, where as my first SC F1 bought in 1993 worked pretty well, the other (F1 Master) was total garbage. It read fast, missed shots/error messages constantly, VERY light sensitive, many impossible low/high crazy readings, and had a shooting area about 10% of my PCD. Went to use SC's much self touted trade in plan, and they reneged because my "Black" F1 Master was not eligible, only the "Green" model?

Using the PCD is a pleasure; you switch it on and shoot through huge screens with easy to get reliable results. I don't miss the teathered remote at all, and like that the PCD is made and supported in the US. Cons... The display is a bit small on the PCD, and you only get 9 strings in the memory of 99 shots. I would much rather have more strings of less shots. For me, a good chronograph is essential equipment, and I can't imagine not using one. They really cut through the BS, and add a dimension to handloading that is very intriguing. Best of luck in whatever you choose.

Quickdraw McGraw
October 30, 2009, 08:39 AM
I have the ProChrony and really like it! I also have none of the bells and whistles (record everything manually).

I shoot a lot of cast boolits (lubed and some gas checked) and have put a piece of lexan in front of it to protect it from lube splatters and possible checks coming of. Got a 12" X 12" piece of scrap free from a window and glass place!

http://i231.photobucket.com/albums/ee267/Metzy84/Casting/102_2102.jpg

Galil5.56
October 30, 2009, 09:14 AM
I shoot 95%+ cast as well, and added a thick clear plastic lid to my PCD to protect against lube splatter:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v146/Abucaster/IMG_8823.jpg

Going to do some final fitting so that it has a true "snap fit", or make it easy access during string changes. Also going to use my old SC plexi laminate for use during gas check shooting... Good score on that Lexan.

Walkalong
October 30, 2009, 09:43 AM
I have the Competition Electronics ProChrono. Works fine.Same here.

MAXM
October 30, 2009, 10:19 AM
+ 1 for ProChrono Digital.
Bad experience (two times) with Chrony.

Deavis
October 30, 2009, 01:51 PM
My experience that I've posted before:

Bought a Pact XP and it has given me a lot of trouble. Sent it in for service twice before I bought a CED. Setup the CED and the Pact at the same range on the same day and the CED proceeded to capture every single one of the more than 500 rounds fired over it. The Pact didn't register a single round despite trying every remedy ever recommended. New battery, switching out sensors, angled towards the sun, away from the sun, 90 degrees to vertical, with diffusers, without diffusers, switched out lenses, and on and on.

I sent a letter to the president of Pact asking him to fix it once and for all and haven't heard back since. I've considered sending it back and telling them to keep it but I'm afraid they'd pawn it off on some other person and make them suffer like I have. Your mileage may vary but I won't consider them for any product until they fix it or at least reply to my letter like a professional companny would. I hear all these great things, but that hasn't been my experience and they aren't helping by ignoring me.

The CED is great, not as nicely featured as the PACT, but it has worked for me 100% of the time whether it was cloudy, full sun, morning, and afternoon. The download software and USB connection are another plus, its CSV output is better than Pact's in my opinion. You won't be sorry for buying it.

I have yet to hear anything from Pact despite mailing and calling them multiple times. Very poor customer support in my opinion. The CED Millenium Pro has continued to perform well and once you get used to it, it is a breeze to use. Cloudy, sunny, windy, whatever, it works. I've never used the cheaper chronos because I want the ability to download data to my computer.

If you feel that you absolutely must have a printer, I'm willing to bet that 99% of the time, being able to D/L the data is more useful thatn that little printout that will get lost eventually. You can create quite a dataset on your computer to analyze your reloading practices by D/Ling your data versus just writing it down in a book or saving that printout. To me, that is worth the extra money over a shooting chrony, it saves me considerable time in analyzing the data.

psyop
October 30, 2009, 02:02 PM
Pro Chrono...havent used anything else nor do I see a need to. Reasonably priced.

PO2Hammer
October 30, 2009, 02:24 PM
I've been using a friend's Chrony F1 while he avoids winter in Florida (wuss). it doesn't record anything, or have a remote display, but it's cheap and it works.

jsg
October 30, 2009, 02:44 PM
I have the Chrony F1. It works but I wish it had a remote display. I don't mind writing down my data after each shot but if you shoot with more than one person on the range, it can be a real pain to read and tinker without making the other guy stop and unload so you can walk out there a few feet past the firing line.

Oyeboten
October 30, 2009, 11:59 PM
Thanks everyone for your contributions on this matter.


I ordered one from 'Midway' earlier to-day, after carefully regarding your various mentions.


So...I ponied up, and a Brand New "Item Number 852429 Competition Electronics ProChrono Digital Chronograph" shall be arriving next week sometime.


Wooooo-Hooooo!


I'm REALLY looking forward to using it!

JimKirk
October 31, 2009, 12:32 AM
When and I mean WHEN you shoot the face of that Pro, then you'll wish you had looked at the Pact or Oehler!

Jimmy K

1858
October 31, 2009, 03:02 AM
My Chrony Beta Master has a remote and it's very convenient, particularly since the chrony is about 15' away. I write down the velocity of each shot and then transfer the data to an Excel spreadsheet when I get home. I could care less about a printer but a remote is a must have for me.

:)

Oyeboten
October 31, 2009, 04:07 AM
When and I mean WHEN you shoot the face of that Pro, then you'll wish you had looked at the Pact or Oehler!


Lol...


Maybe!



Should I use Clothes Pins or Tape, or? - to hold the Target on those 'Rabbit Ear' things?

I don't want it sliding down and covering the read-out...



(Just kidding...)

Otto
October 31, 2009, 05:05 AM
Oehler's are good but they were discontinued 8 years ago.
I have owned two Shooting Chronys and they're a POS.
Best chrono for the money is a CED M2. I don't think I've ever read a complaint about Competitive Edge Dynamics chronographs.

Bailey Boat
October 31, 2009, 08:10 AM
You guys might consider replacing the metal rods with 1/8th wooden dowel. A friend nicked one of the metal rods once (no damage) and I immediately switched in case it happens again....

Galil5.56
October 31, 2009, 09:48 AM
I ordered one from 'Midway' earlier to-day, after carefully regarding your various mentions.


So...I ponied up, and a Brand New "Item Number 852429 Competition Electronics ProChrono Digital Chronograph" shall be arriving next week sometime.


Wooooo-Hooooo!


I'm REALLY looking forward to using it!

You are really going to enjoy what it will add to your reloading experience, and I look forward to your thoughts/evaluation after trying it out. CE has a policy that covers shot-up machines, as follows:

COMPETITION ELECTRONICS, INC., will recondition to working order any
ProChrono Digital returned to it regardless of condition upon the purchaser's remittance of payment of 1/2 of current retail price, if it is still manufactured
by COMPETITION ELECTRONICS, INC.

Good luck with your nice chronograph!

1858
October 31, 2009, 05:42 PM
I have owned two Shooting Chronys and they're a POS. Best chrono for the money is a CED M2. I don't think I've ever read a complaint about Competitive Edge Dynamics chronographs.

I have a Shooting Chrony and it works just fine. Like ALL chronographs, lighting is important and many of the errors encountered by chrony users are a direct result of improper lighting. Essentially they all do the same thing but it would be interesting to read an extensive chronograph review of the most common models. As for the CED M2, it looks like a decent model. The PC interface is useful and it comes with a remote. The built in calculator seems redundant, but perhaps it's included so that the user can figure out how much they just spent on ammunition!

:)

jfh
October 31, 2009, 05:53 PM
I'm a bit behind on the "latest and greatest" but, eighteen months ago I first tried a Chrony Beta Master and then a CED M2 after my early (? brand--big, twenty years ago, made in TX) needed rebuilding (bad electronics).

I found the Beta Master to be satisfactory, but a bit iffy with the sun-and-shade issues, and maybe a bit susceptible to muzzle blast. The CED M2 I found delightful, but I was then shooting up to 500 rounds or so a week for a reloading project data gathering, and I truly appreciate the easy data download and the storage capacity of the CED M2.

This year, I've had a Chrono out twice--and any model would do finel, I suspect. But--for building long-term computer-based data bases, the CED M2 can't be beat, IMO.

Jim H.

Galil5.56
October 31, 2009, 06:05 PM
Well, that is exactly why I hate Shooting Chrony chronographs; erratic performance where one may be "good", another off the line, junk... Some work OK but finicky, other's are complete POS and that was my experience with them. Both were set up correctly (proper light/new battery/completely unfolded/ 20 ft away/proper diffuser use, etc.....) My second SC would get constant error messages, crazy velocities, read WAY fast (same lot of ammo and firearm), or just flat refuse to trigger a reading. Also it had a shooting area of 3" above the center eyes... Any bullet outside of say an imaginary 3" tube and not precisely over the eyes was an error or no read. Ironic, but in the exact same or even more challenging conditions the ProChrono digital just works without all the B.S. Drama I had with Shooting Chrony products. Although the PCD does not have a remote that can view velocity, it does have one to change strings, and they also have software that allows downloading to your PC.

I really am happy for folks who like their SC (considering it's accurate), but enough was enough for me, and their crappy CS was the icing on the cake. BTW, some Chrono's don't need visible light, as they use IR and can be shot in total darkness with accurate results. Lastly, Taffin did a review of 4 popular model Chronographs, and a little googling might be worth the effort.

Friendly, Don't Fire!
October 31, 2009, 06:23 PM
I have a Shooting Chrony F1 with remote readout that I place on the shooting bench, so I don't have to keep walking to the unit. I also have the pushbutton cable that allows me to go back through the velocities, look at Av, ES, etc.

Yes, there have been erratic records, but that definately has to do with my not setting it up properly with respect to lighting and/or the lighting somehow changes (cloudy to sunny and vice-versa).

For the price, I am a happy camper.

Calling a Shooting Chrony a POS is just like me calling a Taurus revolver a POS because I had a negative experience before I even purhased it -- so I DIDN'T PURCHASE IT!

Galil5.56
October 31, 2009, 06:41 PM
Did you completely read my posts? I have owned TWO SC, one a std F1 bought in 1993 that was OK but finicky, and because of this experience predicated me doing a paid factory "upgrade" to the teathered F1 Master that in my experience of actual use and ownership was a total POS for reasons I specify. I made sure to say "in my experience", so as not to be a poster who knocks equipment w/o any experience with the product, and out of respect for those who like what they have.

I figure folks ask questions on this forum as a guide to help them, and would appreciate actual owners experience and opinion be it good or bad... The best we can do is convey our own experiences hoping the poster of such opinions is being fair, honest, and employed the product correctly... For me, I'm glad the OP went with the ProChrono Digital, and if it is defective, not to his liking, whatever tells us why so we all learn somthing.

Oyeboten
October 31, 2009, 07:27 PM
My uses will be very patient, methodical, and deliberate, and, I won't mind walking over to the Chronograph to see the read-out.


I really doubt I will accidentaly hit the Unit or it's Antenna, especially if it is only 20 feet away.


My criteria...was/is reliability, and simplicity, and, if possible, a fairly modest cost.


If I later find I am wishing I had a 'better' or more sophisticated Model, then I will research more thoroughly, and, get one.


The 'SC' Brand sounds like their units are of varying and possibly 'iffy' quality control, or, of varying reliability, or finickyness, unit-to-unit.


I don't wish to be taking a gamble on having to deal with those Heart wrending issues. Especially after setting it all up at the Range..!

Walkalong
October 31, 2009, 08:08 PM
Chrono at 5 yards with the target at 7 yards (http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=106923&d=1255198927). I have an extra set of rods and shades, just in case. ;)

Simple to set up. Good enough for my uses, and I don't mind walking up to it either.

1858
October 31, 2009, 09:18 PM
Walkalong, looks like you need to aim a little higher! :D

Walkalong
October 31, 2009, 10:11 PM
aim a little higher!
At first I went ...huh? Then I looked at the pic again. Busted out laughing....http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x37/Walkalong/LOLhysterical.gif

jfh
October 31, 2009, 10:32 PM
Oyeboten, about shooting over a chronograph:

"...I really doubt I will accidentaly hit the Unit or it's Antenna, especially if it is only 20 feet away."

BWWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

Jim H.

Walkalong
October 31, 2009, 10:35 PM
Darn tootin'. I have an extra set of shades and rods for a reason. :o :D

I'm hunting wabbits...... http://i183.photobucket.com/albums/x37/Walkalong/ElmerFudd.gif

Oyeboten
October 31, 2009, 10:52 PM
So...for Black Powder, will I still elect to have the Chronograph so close? - "5 Yards"?

JimKirk
October 31, 2009, 11:26 PM
OK ... I see that Oehler is out of business, proof that I've not needed to buy another chrono than my old Pact I! I have had to buy several sets of "eyes" for mine, some wounds by others and some self inflicted wounds! At $20 a set much cheaper than ou there. The Chrony that my friend owned, had been back to the maker three times before he shot it dead center.

Jimmy K

jfh
October 31, 2009, 11:28 PM
I can't speak for the others, Oyeboten, and I dunno about black powder chrono work--but my chrono is typically set up within 8-10 feet. That's the limit of the lead length to the various heads / brands I have used.

Jim H.

1SOW
November 1, 2009, 12:51 AM
I "Borrowed" a friends Shooting Chrony -basic model-, carefully set it up on a bright sunny 75ish deg TX day, shot my pistol from a rest at 10-12', had a 25 yd target set up to check groups.

All went well, after a few strings, I found my 124fmj- 4.0gr n320-130pf load.

I found out later, several competitors shooting this same combo & COL out of the same gun had to use 4.2 or more grains of n320 to get this same or slightly less PF. They were checked by high dollar chronos at matches.
I couldn't depend on meeting PF requirements with my Chrono'd load.

Maybe it was coincidence, if you believe in such things.
Maybe I did something wrong.
It didn't make me confident about Shooting Chrony.

For my first, I'm going to try the ProChrony Digital

MinnMooney
November 1, 2009, 01:26 AM
That's what I've had for a year or so.

It works very well SOME OF THE TIME and gets fussy at other times and gives me too many errors. At times, the ratio is 7 good to 3 errors. that costs extra shots to get a 10-shot string for averaging.

I'm looking into getting something else.

P.S. I see some posters say that the remote and/or the printer aren't worth the extra dollars. I have both and wouldn't do without either. It's like air conditioning in your car... Do you NEED it? No. Is it really great to have? Of course.

JimKirk
November 2, 2009, 08:49 PM
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=484113

Jimmy K

NCsmitty
November 2, 2009, 09:27 PM
I use the Prochron Digital. Simple to use and reliable.



NCsmitty

1858
November 2, 2009, 09:33 PM
Best chrono for the money is a CED M2. I don't think I've ever read a complaint about Competitive Edge Dynamics chronographs.

After checking out that particular model and reading a number of reviews, I decided to order one today. I particularly like the USB interface which should prove to be very convenient. I hope it's as good as everyone seems to think it is. The cost at around $200 isn't too bad when you consider the cost of ammunition ... even reloads. I'm working up loads for numerous rifles and pistols so I figured it'd be worth the investment.

:)

Walkalong
November 2, 2009, 09:46 PM
I think that is an excellent choice. They certainly have a great reputation.

JimKirk
November 2, 2009, 10:11 PM
After reading the specs the CED M2 does appear to be a excellent choice.

Jimmy K

jfh
November 2, 2009, 10:40 PM
I am very satisfied overall.

Yes, I can have gotten some false readings--but only because I have, on occasion, worked with no less than five bullseyes on one target, to save time....it genuinely does have a large reading area, however. It works, and works well, period. Some minor negatives are

1. Don't try using a 9v.rechargable battery (e.g., Lithium-Ion, whatever) because it does not have voltage compensation;

2. The rods are proprietary / plastic.

The memory capacity and USB computer interface was primarily what sold me--and those run smoothly.

Highly Recommended, albeit a premium price.

Jim H.

mmorris
November 2, 2009, 10:47 PM
I have a ProChrono Digital that I like.
I replaced the metal rods with wood dowels (painted red for visibility), added packing tape to cover the light openings, and fitted a 1/4" plexiglass cover over the display.
I lucked out on the pivot positions and it "over-centers" to rest on top which holds it open. The pivots are nylon wire ties.
I didn't want the tape to gather crud on the inside, so I cut an additional piece of tape just the size of the window and stuck it sticky side to sticky side on the larger piece before putting it on the case (one over each window).

http://www.thehighroad.org/images/attach/jpg.gif

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=108432&stc=1&d=1257216721

http://www.thehighroad.org/images/attach/jpg.gif

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=108434&stc=1&d=1257216800

Quickdraw McGraw
November 2, 2009, 11:29 PM
I have a ProChrono Digital that I like.
I replaced the metal rods with wood dowels (painted red for visibility), added packing tape to cover the light openings, and fitted a 1/4" plexiglass cover over the display.
I lucked out on the pivot positions and it "over-centers" to rest on top which holds it open. The pivots are nylon wire ties.
I didn't want the tape to gather crud on the inside, so I cut an additional piece of tape just the size of the window and stuck it sticky side to sticky side on the larger piece before putting it on the case (one over each window).

http://www.thehighroad.org/images/attach/jpg.gif

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachmen...1&d=1257216721

http://www.thehighroad.org/images/attach/jpg.gif

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachmen...1&d=1257216800
Attached Thumbnails

Love the way you attached the plexiglass. If you don't mind in gonna adapt my mine. I got lexan on mine! Great Idea!!!

Deavis
November 2, 2009, 11:31 PM
Good choice, you won't be sorry

Oyeboten
November 2, 2009, 11:48 PM
Just what do the 'Rods' actually do on these?


Are they merely for supporting the Canopy?


And...what does the Canopy do?


I really have no idea how these things measure the speed of the Bullet's passing...

mmorris
November 3, 2009, 12:22 AM
Love the way you attached the plexiglass. If you don't mind in gonna adapt my mine. I got lexan on mine! Great Idea!!!

Thanks, Quickdraw. Feel free... I lost the patent application somewhere under a pile of wheel weights :D

1858
November 3, 2009, 12:24 AM
I really have no idea how these things measure the speed of the Bullet's passing...

The sensors are typically photodiodes that are sensitive to changes in light. They react to changes in light by producing a known current or voltage difference. You can read about them HERE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photodiode). The screens are used to give a uniform, high-constrast background so that the photodiodes have a better chance of detecting the movement of the bullet. The bullet casts a "shadow" as it passes over the sensors resulting in a non steady state condition which results in a change in current or potential. This change is processed by a bunch of IC chips on the board and the velocity is calculated using some fancy algorithm. The rods support the screens and give you a "target" to aim through/over if you use them with/without the screens.

I don't know about you guys, but that's all I need to know. Knowing exactly how the photodiodes convert bullet movement into a velocity isn't necessary. A general sense of what is going on is good enough ... for me anyway. You can spend a lot of time trying to understand how semi-conductors work, learning about n-type, p-type, electron holes and doping etc. but I've got better things to do. Suffice it to say that some materials are light sensitive (and can be made to be more light sensitive through doping) and electrons in those materials can move between band gaps when exposed to photons.

:)

mmorris
November 3, 2009, 12:44 AM
Just what do the 'Rods' actually do on these?

Are they merely for supporting the Canopy?
yep

And...what does the Canopy do?
They diffuse light to aid in bullet detection under certain lighting conditions.

I really have no idea how these things measure the speed of the Bullet's passing... The front and rear sensors detect the shadow of the passing bullet and the time between these events is converted to a speed measurement.

mmorris
November 3, 2009, 12:46 AM
oops! :p

1858 trumped my pathetic reply :o

1858
November 3, 2009, 01:00 AM
mmorris, there's nothing pathetic about your reply ... both explanations are useful so don't worry about it.

:)

Seedtick
November 3, 2009, 02:05 AM
Hey mmorris,

I get the wooden dowels and the Plexiglass front cover
but what is the tape over the light openings for?
Just to keep out dust and debris?
:confused:

ST

Oyeboten
November 3, 2009, 04:06 AM
Thanks for the explanations...


I was not sure if they used an EMF Field...


I am surprised that a Photovoltaic Cell could be so sensitive.


I think the Photovoltaic Cell was invented by Edward Weston, whose son, later, adapted it for Photographer's Light Meters.

1858
November 3, 2009, 05:10 AM
The first (front) photodiode is just sitting there sampling at some frequency (48 MHz micro-controller for the CED M2) with a steady stream of photons producing a steady voltage and/or current. Once the bullet's shadow passes over the sensor, there's a disruption to the steady state, the timing process has started, and now the next sensor (at steady state) is waiting to see a shadow or change to stop to clock. The more consistent the steady state condition, the more accurate and consistent the chronograph will be. Consistent lighting with sufficient energy (enough photons) above the sensor that provides sufficient contrast to the bullet's shadow will yield the best results.

I'm no chronograph expert and certainly not an electrical engineer but here's another thing to think about. With the CED M2 sampling at a rate of 48,000,000 times per second, if you assume that the sampling plane that the bullet passes through (over each sensor) is 1/4" thick, the bullet or shadow has been sampled almost 385 times (bullet moving at 2,600 fps) as it passes over the sensor. The micro-controller will have to decide when the clock starts i.e. first sampling, tenth sampling, hundredth sampling etc. and then make the same decision for the second sensor to stop the clock. This is where the algorithm used by each manufacturer may be different.

Zak may be along shortly to tell us how they really work since he IS an electrical engineer ... but this will have to do until then and I think I've said quite enough.

Good luck to all regardless of which model you have or decide to buy.

:)

Oyeboten
November 3, 2009, 06:22 AM
Sunny here usually enough (Las Vegas, Nevada)...especially in the Summer.


Out at the Range, Summer-time, it probably gets into the mid 120s 'F'.


I hope the Electronics like it...

mmorris
November 3, 2009, 08:03 AM
I get the wooden dowels and the Plexiglass front cover
but what is the tape over the light openings for?
Just to keep out dust and debris? - Seedtick

Exactly.

I just don't like the idea of the sensor windows being an opening into the case, what with all the debris that follows the bullet, or even more, a 20 Ga slug.

MAXM
November 3, 2009, 09:27 AM
The tape over the light openings is a nice idea, but I think that the light coming from the sky could partially "bounce" over the tape (ask to a photographer), reducing the amount of light available for the chrono sensors.

I'd like to know what do you think about this.

Bests,
Maxm

mmorris
November 3, 2009, 12:32 PM
MAXM-The tape over the light openings is a nice idea, but I think that the light coming from the sky could partially "bounce" over the tape...
I had reservations when I put the tape on, but I didn't see any significant indications that the readings were negatively affected. This means that the chrono worked, and test .22 rimfire rounds seemed to indicate box label velocities.

I have not, however, engaged in testing to determine if a wide range of operating conditions will cause problems. Please do not take this info as anything other than anecdotal.

dubbleA
November 3, 2009, 02:14 PM
Another vote for the CED M2.

I shoot 99.9% indoors from my reloading room and use the the IR diffusers along with a laptop. All in all it's a good chrony, my dislikes are that the unit dosent come with a aux power jack (though the IR screens do come with a transformer) and the folding arm bracket. I have since fixed both of them. Mine uses a 120v/9V transformer and has a steel bracket now and is pretty much static and doesnt move.

I did recently set it up at 600 yards to get actual velocities in which it did, though that triangle area gets awfully small to shoot through.

1858
November 3, 2009, 02:20 PM
I did recently set it up at 600 yards to get actual velocities in which it did, though that triangle area gets awfully small to shoot through.

At 600 yards the wind could be a problem in terms of getting consistent data i.e. keeping the shots over the sensors, although I don't yet own a CED M2 so have no idea as to the tolerance. Elevation is easy to control but did you take any special precautions in terms of protecting the unit? How many shots registered (percentage of shots fired)?

:)

dubbleA
November 3, 2009, 10:25 PM
I placed a piece of 1/4" plate in front of the sensors. There is a triangle roughly 10 inches high,12 inches across the top and the bottom is about 4 inches wide to shoot through so you had better be shooting fairly well to get them to register. I didnt do alot of testing but went five for five. I found my 308 load lost appx 900fps from the muzzle.

Seedtick
November 4, 2009, 12:25 AM
I get the wooden dowels and the Plexiglass front cover
but what is the tape over the light openings for?
Just to keep out dust and debris? - Seedtick

mmorris Quote: Exactly.

I just don't like the idea of the sensor windows being an opening into the case, what with all the debris that follows the bullet, or even more, a 20 Ga slug.

Thanks, That's what I was thinking.


Originally Posted by dubbleA
I did recently set it up at 600 yards to get actual velocities in which it did, though that triangle area gets awfully small to shoot through.

If it were me shooting from 600 yards
it would be much safer for the chronograph
if I tried to hit it. :scrutiny:

ST

Zak Smith
November 6, 2009, 04:05 AM
I have an Oehler 35P and it's very good. It gives the most consistent results with the fewest "did not register" problems. Its downside is that it is fairly large (I use the 4' screens), clunky, and kind of a pain to set up.

Oyeboten
November 6, 2009, 09:49 PM
Well...my Brand New "Item Number 852429 Competition Electronics ProChrono Digital Chronograph" arrived yesterday...


I went to the Range today, and tried it out...and it was a real pleasure.


Easy to use, tidy, fast set-up and take-down, and really fun!


I will post my results in a 'Range Report' Thread shortly.


Thanks again everyone for your replies to my initial question...

Seems very likable Chronogrph indeed...very glad I took-the-plunge.

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