most durable handgun


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Revolver Ocelot
November 3, 2009, 09:42 AM
If I were to ask you all for a reccomendation for a handgun that could tolerate endless shooting and still out live me with out breaking what would you say?

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acmax95
November 3, 2009, 09:44 AM
Ruger Security 6

chuckusaret
November 3, 2009, 09:51 AM
S&W pre model 10 with serial number S769XXX manufactured at the end of 1944.

Vern Humphrey
November 3, 2009, 09:53 AM
M1911. I've put many thousands of rounds through various M1911s. And unlike revolvers, when a part breaks, a drop-in replacement is available.

CajunBass
November 3, 2009, 09:54 AM
Most any of them. With the exception of ones like RG, Raven, that class, but any quality gun will outlive most of us.

If I managed to wear one out, I'd brag about it.

DeepSouth
November 3, 2009, 10:21 AM
S&W pre model 10 with serial number S769XXX manufactured at the end of 1944.

Well, I would have just said and old Smith or Colt revolver but yours was good to. :D

Typically I'm more of an auto guy, I'm just not going to deceive myself into thinking auto's are more durable than revolvers.

justashooter in pa
November 3, 2009, 11:20 AM
gotta go with the 1911 pattern guns. i carry one made in 1935, and quite a few uniformed fellows carried it before i got it.

kwikrnu
November 3, 2009, 11:25 AM
Smith and wesson model 17.

ArmedBear
November 3, 2009, 11:34 AM
Ruger Mark II or 22/45 heavy barrel.

If you're talking about shot count, I think it's no contest.

I don't think you could put 100,000 rounds through a Security Six without any repairs, but a Mark II? No problem.

JellyJar
November 3, 2009, 12:01 PM
Ruger Super Redhawk in .357 mag:

http://www.thehighroad.org/archive/index.php/t-5430.html

darksidemxer
November 3, 2009, 12:06 PM
good quality GI spec 1911 or honestly....my bersa 380 has been insanely reliable, my xdm never had an issue with close to 30k through it...and the STI gp6 9mm is said to be the best...

Arkansas Paul
November 3, 2009, 12:08 PM
I don't have a lot of experience with autos, but for revolvers, the answer is anything with Ruger on it.

Vern Humphrey
November 3, 2009, 12:34 PM
The M1911 has been everywhere, places revolvers and other guns never dreamed about going. It got its baptism of fire in 1913 in the Phillipines, it was in Mexico for the Vera Cruz expedition in 1914. It was in Haiti in 1915, in Mexico for the Punative Expedition in 1916, in the trenches in France in 1918. After WWI, it served in Archangel in Russia and on the Trans-Siberian railway and in Central America for the Banana Wars. In WWII it served from the deserts of North Africa to the rain forests of New Guinea. It soldiered through Korea and Viet Nam.

It's a rugged design, with few small parts -- especially few small parts that come under stress (unlike the hand and cylinder stop in a revolver.) And all its parts are drop-in replacement when you wear one out.

kanook
November 3, 2009, 01:20 PM
Redhawk or Blackhawk in 357 would be my vote.

gyvel
November 3, 2009, 01:36 PM
The M1911 has been everywhere, places revolvers and other guns never dreamed about going. It got its baptism of fire in 1913 in the Phillipines, it was in Mexico for the Vera Cruz expedition in 1914. It was in Haiti in 1915, in Mexico for the Punative Expedition in 1916, in the trenches in France in 1918. After WWI, it served in Archangel in Russia and on the Trans-Siberian railway and in Central America for the Banana Wars. In WWII it served from the deserts of North Africa to the rain forests of New Guinea. It soldiered through Korea and Viet Nam.

KINDA HARD TO BEAT THIS TRACK RECORD...:cool:

cmfireman
November 3, 2009, 01:40 PM
Ruger P89

raz-0
November 3, 2009, 01:45 PM
It all comes down to what your definition of "endless" shooting is.

If you are into heavy competition, almost everything on a gun is a wear item when you get down to it.

But take a glock, well made 1911, and a .45acp revolver (low pressure, so you aren't eroding the top strap much).

All three of them you'll shoot out the barrel at some point. Might be 30,000 rounds, might be 100,000 rounds, but somewhere in there, the barrel will probably have some issues. It is really dependent on the barrel and the loads you shoot.

On a 1911, you can wear out or break slide stops, thumb safeties, trigger group components, break the barrel link, crack the slide, and crack the frame.

On a glock, you likely will crack the frame as it ages, especially on the 22 it seems. You will shoot out barrels, although the stock barrel does seem to tend to make it past 50k more often than not. The slides can also crack, but odds are the frame will go first. You can wear out extractors, and trigger parts.

On the S&W revolver, you have timing issues creep up, which is the main thing in addition to shooting out the barrel (although I'm not a big revovler guy, so i may be missing some issues). If you are shooting higher pressure rounds like magnums, you will erode the top strap. .44 magnum in the S&W or the smaller taurus frame will basically destroy itself with use with regards to cylinder lockup.

Stick with an all steel gun, and there isn't much that isn't fixable. If your idea of a lot of shooting is a few hundred rounds a year, you will be shooting all of them for quite some time.

Dr.Rob
November 3, 2009, 02:42 PM
Nods to the 1911, any revolver kept cleaned and oiled. BHP's are pretty darn stout too.

But I'd say the Colt single action army has outlived quite a few of its original owners and is still shooting. Simple is good.

I had a friend I worked with who shot a lot, and NEVER cleaned his P-89. Don't ask me why he was a Marine and new better, he just wanted to see how far it could go I guess.

Dambugg
November 3, 2009, 02:57 PM
Berreta 92. My brother was an armorer for the Air Force. There were a lot of 92s or m9s if you will, that he was responsible for and no matter the age or appearance they all cycled and put lead down range. He said the same for the couple of Smith model 10s they had but they've already been mentioned.

I have to agree with the earlier sentiments about the Ruger speed six. My old neighbor had one since the early seventies and has carried it everyday since it was new. He reloads for a living and has put thousands upon thousands of rounds through this gun. It is still shooting and it is still the gun he depends on for conceal carry.

Water-Man
November 3, 2009, 03:02 PM
A Freedom Arms revolver!

MichiganShootist
November 3, 2009, 03:05 PM
Ruger Blackhawk in 357

ArmedBear
November 3, 2009, 03:05 PM
Thousands of rounds? Big whoop.

I shoot .22 pistol competition, and there are guys who have put 150,000 through a Ruger or Browning semiauto pistol without having to do anything to the gun other than the action tuning they did when they first got it -- and still continued to win matches with the thing.

What does that show?

A handgun with a stationary barrel has an advantage. A handgun with oversized moving parts and polished sliding surfaces has an advantage. A handgun that's built heavy for the rounds it fires has an advantage.

KAK
November 3, 2009, 03:09 PM
Ive heard of some rugers being nearly bomb proof. I would personally think that the S&W 500 mag is one of those guns made to last very long!! It is very overbuilt and weighs as much as some rifles. Dont be too scared of the kick its not as bad as youd think.

okespe04
November 3, 2009, 04:09 PM
Ruger gp 100s are tanks

Blue Brick
November 3, 2009, 04:48 PM
Anything Ruger!

ByAnyMeans
November 3, 2009, 04:56 PM
Steel: 1911
Polymer: Glock

I know nothing about revolvers so I will defer to others on that.

au2183
November 3, 2009, 05:43 PM
I don't recall seeing a caliber. Or did I miss it? That would have a HUGE affect on my recommendation.

MisterMike
November 3, 2009, 05:44 PM
Oops. Posted in wrong thread. Sorry!

John Parker
November 3, 2009, 05:51 PM
Berreta 92. My brother was an armorer for the Air Force. There were a lot of 92s or m9s if you will, that he was responsible for and no matter the age or appearance they all cycled and put lead down range.

After several deployments to the Middle East and Central Asia, I must heartily disagree with this statement.

Dambugg
November 3, 2009, 06:53 PM
I understand your disagreement. I must say the guns functioned well on the base and had no malfunctions that were attributed to the sidearms themselves. Please pm me with what problems you had with the m9, as I am a fan of them and would like to know what to be weary of.

-v-
November 3, 2009, 06:55 PM
Ruger P- series.

Gibbles
November 3, 2009, 07:12 PM
I useto say my GI 1911, but while out deer hunting and bored as crap waiting for the sun to set I took my gun and ran it into the dirt real good, I managed to lock up the action through the barrel lockup, I had to clear it on a good solid fence post.

Right now my vote goes to my G21 until it proves other wise to me.
It passed the dirt test with flying colors.
(I got my deer in the same spot on sun rise still packing the same 1911 :) )

frankiestoys
November 3, 2009, 08:09 PM
Ruger gp 100 , sp 101

HcadetK
November 3, 2009, 08:12 PM
Glock

John Parker
November 3, 2009, 08:13 PM
I understand your disagreement. I must say the guns functioned well on the base and had no malfunctions that were attributed to the sidearms themselves.

Okay, I'll have to give you that. I'm not a fan of the M9. I think it's too large, bulky, and heavy for the cartridge it fires. I don't like its ergonomics. However, I've never had a malfunction with one, though I've seen numerous failures to fire, eject, stovepiping, etc. I've always done some digging in the magazine boxes and grabbed factory Beretta mags. And since I wasn't the one using the pistols that I saw with problems, I really shouldn't be attributing that to the gun itself.
What I'm really trying to say is that I wish I could bash the Beretta on something aside from personal preference, but I've never had a real reason to do so.

mljdeckard
November 3, 2009, 08:38 PM
As am armorer in the army, I DID see more than one Beretta break, from various causes.

I have a Kimber 1911 that I use for everything and I trust completely. HOWEVER, there is such thing as a 1911 that needs help to run well. There is a BIG gap in reliability in 1911s.

If I had to pick a gun, sight unseen, history unknown, to just pick up and use, I would take a Glock every time. I'm a 1911 guy, but I think that after the nuclear dust settles, it will be cockroaches and Glocks left.

For revolvers, all of them will outlast most shooters, but if I was to instigate a head to head torture test, I think the Rugers and S&Ws will keep banging long after the Rossis, Charters, and Tauri have had failures in their lockwork.

Dambugg
November 3, 2009, 08:41 PM
I completely understand. I am five foot four with smallish hands and the m9 is cumbersome at times for someone as small as myself. That being said I've had 92s since I started shooting pistols 15 years ago. I have handled much better feeling guns but I would take the 92 into the gates of hell.

Gibbles
November 3, 2009, 08:46 PM
I love revolvers but while messing around with dirt revolvers just had to much to go wrong.

Even after cleaning my 1911 well I had a FTF after 4 rounds in my 1911 calling my group that were moving on while I checked one last spot for my deer, I think the issue was that I used the extractor to remove the main spring housing and in the process I changed the tension the night before... :banghead: (I was tired and my gun was full of sand :p)

I love 1911's but my glocks are my trusted guns for now.

I made some cuts on the slide of the 1911 a while back to help with dirt and they worked like a charm, I just need to figure out what to do with the barrel lockup... that seems to be the big weak point right now (no room for error).

And I got the tension reset on that extractor now. ;)

.45&TKD
November 3, 2009, 08:55 PM
I think the issue was that I used the extractor to remove the main spring housing and in the process I changed the tension the night before...

Ya think?

Confederate
November 3, 2009, 09:02 PM
If you can replace parts like pins, springs and extractors, almost any gun will meet your requirements. If you need a SHTF gun that will go for the rest of your life with no parts replacements it's going to be a Ruger revolver followed by a Ruger .22LR auto. Regular autos need maintenance like spring and extractor changes, but when sanctions were leveled against Rhodesia and South Africa years ago, shooters in these countries bought up all the Rugers they could. Why? Because Rugers can last a lifetime with no parts replacements.

The Security-Six is still a favorite for people, and of course the GP-100 and others will stand up just as well. (I'm partial to the Security-Six because, without the grips, it still looks like a gun. The GP-100 is a combination of the frame and grips, and both are needed to make the gun complete. It's not a real issue, but it's a cut corner.)

The revolvers and the .22 autos are designed to last a lifetime. A Beretta, Colt or other big-bore auto, requires magazine and recoil spings and small parts replacements to remain functioning over a long period of time.

qwert65
November 3, 2009, 09:02 PM
another vote for the ruger blackhawk

easyg
November 4, 2009, 01:38 PM
If I had to pick a gun, sight unseen, history unknown, to just pick up and use, I would take a Glock every time. I'm a 1911 guy, but I think that after the nuclear dust settles, it will be cockroaches and Glocks left.

For revolvers, all of them will outlast most shooters, but if I was to instigate a head to head torture test, I think the Rugers and S&Ws will keep banging long after the Rossis, Charters, and Tauri have had failures in their lockwork.
I agree 100%.

Autoloader: Glock

Revolver: Ruger

Revolver Ocelot
November 4, 2009, 01:41 PM
would a polymer gun really out live me? I know they are reliable and can be shot plenty but plastic breaks down over time.

John Wayne
November 4, 2009, 01:49 PM
I vote for Glock. Not my personal fave by any means, but there have been documented cases of Glock pistols with over 100,000 rounds through them. Also, Glock sells factory replacement parts at dirt cheap costs, something most manufacturers don't do (replacement front sights are $1.99, recoil spring assemblies are $5.99, for example).

Also, polymer won't rust, or dent if you drop it. The Glock slide is steel, but I can honestly say that I've never seen a rusty one. There are very durable revolvers (like Ruger, don't think I'd put Colt or Smith in the same category), but they also weigh a lot more than a Glock and hold less rounds.

If you get dirt or crud in the mechanism of a Glock, it takes all of 30 seconds to field strip it and swish it around in a bucket of water. The mechanism of a revolver is closed, but eventually dirt, lint, or residue from firing will work its way in there and clog it up.

Cleaning the lockwork of a Glock requires opposable thumbs and a can of brake cleaner. A revolver requires precision-fitted screwdrivers, a well-lit bench and special tools to keep springs from flying everywhere.


I disagree with the revolver outlasting auto pistols. You run into top strap cutting, cylinder alignment problems, endshake, timing, etc. after a while, and the parts rely on much closer tolerances. It's a far more fragile mechanism by definition of its much more complex design.

*edit*
Yes, polymer guns will outlive you. Plastic breaks down over time but at a much slower rate than the human body :D
And yes, there are probably original Colt SAA's out there that still shoot well. But I'm betting they have either sat in a safe the last 75 years, or had lots of replacement parts. There is nothing particularly robust or user-friendly about the SAA design.

easyg
November 4, 2009, 02:03 PM
would a polymer gun really out live me? I know they are reliable and can be shot plenty but plastic breaks down over time.
If you believe the environmentalists, it takes a very long time for plastic to break down.

My mother still has some Lego's around the house from when I was a kid and that was nearly forty years ago.

Sheepdog1968
November 4, 2009, 02:27 PM
Though not my favorite, I also think Glocks are very durable.

My personal favorite are Sigs. I specifically like their 45 ACP, the P220. I've over 8,000 rounds through mine. There is a bit of wear on the aluminum frame. Nothing that concerns me. I plan to resend to the factory for a once over somewhere between 10,000 and 15,000 rounds as I'm a big fan of prevenative maintenance. If I had to do it all over again, I'd probably purchase the all stainless steel version to reduce wear.

I think just about any modern firearm will never wear out for the average user. Sure, my favorites will have high round counts but the others don't get much use. I wouldn't base my purchase decision on how many rounds till it wears out. I just don't think it is an issue most are likley to experience.

Just One Shot
November 4, 2009, 02:37 PM
Here you go:

http://springfield-armory.primediaoutdoors.com/SPstory11.php

medmo
November 4, 2009, 02:51 PM
This Sig 220 torture test preview on Youtube is interesting and just seems wrong: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpl0ZJkikNA I'm not sure if it makes the 220 the most durable but it's fun to watch them get incredibly abused.

C-grunt
November 4, 2009, 03:02 PM
I would say if its the Glock it has to be the 17. The 22s frame will crack after a lot of shooting.

How about a Single Six? Simple design with a low pressure round.

Cosmoline
November 4, 2009, 03:13 PM
A Single Six firing .22 LR would be very hard to wear out.

collector rob
November 4, 2009, 08:26 PM
I'd have to go for the Ruger Blackhawk in 357/ 9mm conv. Lots of ammo options also.

giggitygiggity
November 4, 2009, 11:48 PM
Glock.

Fishman777
November 5, 2009, 06:19 PM
Maybe with an after market barrel...

http://www.buffalobore.com/index.php?l=product_detail&p=115

SharpsDressedMan
November 5, 2009, 07:44 PM
I think it would have to be that Glock 21 that was shown torture tested on youtube.......

freedomfanatic
November 7, 2009, 12:09 AM
I thought Glocks were the some of the most rugged dependle firearms on the market? I don't know a lot about guns, but that's one of the things I've heard quite a bit. Am I wrong? Is most of what I've heard about glocks just marketing?

Dogbite
November 7, 2009, 01:51 AM
I had a Ruger Gp100 that was used as a carry piece for a police officer, then used in competition, and then I got it and shot the heck out of it. Never one problem. Also, Glocks. Look up torture tests they have done on the G17, its crazy.

Glockman17366
November 7, 2009, 07:49 AM
The Glock would be my call too. Specifically, the 9 mm models and more specifically, the 17.
Polymers do age and exposure to sunlight (UV spectrum, mostly) will accelerate the aging, so I don't think any Glock would be a multi-generational gun.

Marlin 45 carbine
November 7, 2009, 08:49 AM
ruger Mk .22LR, Ruger GP100, S&W 5906

usp9
November 7, 2009, 09:01 AM
Two answers.

For a small caliber plinker/target gun the Colt Woodsman is IMO the finest quality ever made. How many have been handed doen to the next generation?

For a major caliber, the HK MK23 is the stoutest, most robust, thouroughly tested pistol I've seen. It was made to be abused and still work. No reason it couldn't outlive several owners.

Fishman777
November 7, 2009, 10:04 AM
Ruger Redhawk chambered in .357 magnum. This gun was designed to be used for .44 magnum +.

It is a six shot DA with a solid steel frame, a triple locking cylinder, and only six rounds bored into the cylinder. The cylinder is just ridiculous. It is perhaps one the most overbuilt gun ever.

If not this, take your pick of either Ruger or Freedom arms SA revolvers...

woad_yurt
November 7, 2009, 05:43 PM
I also vote for Ruger and S&W revolvers, like those above. I'd like to add Makarovs and old H&R .22s. They'll be around for quite a while longer, also.

Meeteetse
November 7, 2009, 06:34 PM
If the gun says Ruger on it, it will meet or exceed any expectations you have. Big bore or .22, large gun or small, Rugers are intended to be passed on from one generation to the next. I do not believe the average person can wear out a Ruger. You will run out of time, ammo and money long before the gun breaks down. . . . .

jfh
November 7, 2009, 06:57 PM
So, the conventional wisdom leans to Glock semiautos and Ruger revolvers.

Where would Ruger all-metal semiautos fit in? Can they be serviced easily, like Glocks? Do they have high round counts? Anybody have any experience with them?

Jim H.

hotshotshoting
November 8, 2009, 03:36 AM
i would lean towards the glocks....


and thats saying alot cause im an HK guy!

but what can i say i have over 60k + rnds through my usp 45 compact with 0 problems as of yet and the barrel looks brand new...

all i want is an HK with a glock finish!

P97
November 8, 2009, 03:58 PM
Rugers

The P90 hasn't been MFG'ed long enough to find out just how durable it is. The OM Blackhawks have been pretty durable.

Skillet
November 8, 2009, 08:05 PM
No CZ love here?
i know that CZ has gone through tons of tests with the 75B and some of their other military models.
and, NATO tested and passed, as well as being tested by the several militaries in europe and other areas throughout the globe.
if CZ sells so many of them to the militaries of Europe and Africa and various other places, they must have something going for em.
i have a CZ 75B, and i haven't shot it much, but it hasn't jammed so far. I probably have close to a thousand rounds through it maybe more. not a hiccup. the finish is extraordinary, and the durability must be good, because it was designed to be a military sidearm from the start.
they must have gotten something right.

KyJim
November 8, 2009, 08:12 PM
My money would be on the Ruger MK II .22 LR (probably the other Mark series Rugers).

Fishman777
November 10, 2009, 12:29 AM
Then I would have to say Single Six Hunter. I've got one and it is a beast. It weighs in at around 45 or 46 ounces and it is only a .22 lr/.22 mag convertible.

rd2007
November 15, 2009, 02:46 PM
an under-folder AK can technically be held like a handgun and it has a pistol grip... :D

I'd say either a GP100 or SP101. Rugers are like stainless steel AK-47 revolvers.

357sigRog
November 16, 2009, 02:30 AM
Glocks for me.

purebred
November 16, 2009, 02:54 AM
gotta go with the 1911 pattern guns. i carry one made in 1935, and quite a few uniformed fellows carried it before i got it.
Got to go with this one I got a Colt 1911a1 made in 1952 and still going strong

Bill_G
November 17, 2009, 02:37 PM
according to some web torture tests.....the Glock 30.

JamEEson
November 17, 2009, 03:16 PM
If my life was on the line....
Glock done and done


Love my 1911's though ;)

sonier
November 17, 2009, 03:28 PM
TOO EASY
just about any single action revolver, its a old design that has withstood more torture test's than anything out there.

fireside44
November 17, 2009, 03:31 PM
thompson contender.:)

wow6599
November 17, 2009, 10:31 PM
3rd Gen S&W Auto or Ruger GP100

Erik M
November 18, 2009, 12:10 AM
Ruger Blackhawk for a revolver


*gag* Glock for an auto. I have seen them take sick amounts of abuse.

BOP222
November 21, 2009, 09:57 PM
S&W Model 4566. Tank of the gun world.

Floppy_D
November 21, 2009, 10:28 PM
Not to sound like an echo or a Ruger fanboy, but anything that says Ruger.

ndh87
November 21, 2009, 10:57 PM
glock 17 or a good 1911

atlanticfire
November 21, 2009, 11:52 PM
Ruger Security 6
+100

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