loading 9mm


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brandnew
November 5, 2009, 04:34 AM
Hey all. I've been loading 100gr .380 bullets for myself, and now my father in law wants to start loading 9mm. Since the diameter is the same, can he use some of my 100gr bullets to load into his 9mm cases with his dies? Any reason that would be a bad idea? I suppose the only issue I can think of is that the OAL might not be as long as it should be.

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Deflexor
November 5, 2009, 05:18 AM
Diameter for 9mm is 0.355
Dia. for 380 is 0.356
Dia. for 38 spc. is 0.357

Loading data exists for 90, 95, 115 gr and larger bullets for 9mm.

I have loaded smaller dia. in a larger dia. rifle, shooting 310 bullets in a 311 barrel.

I haven't loaded the other direction, but I know it has been done.

JDGray
November 5, 2009, 06:30 AM
A while back someone posted on this very subject, and was getting great accuracy with 90 or 100gr bullets. Thinking they were plated Rainiers:)

Marlin 45 carbine
November 5, 2009, 09:10 AM
give power pistol a try for jacketed slugs and bullseye or red dot for cast - rd the cleaner of the 2 and for me anyway (5906 S&W) slightly better groups.

RidgwayCO
November 5, 2009, 10:07 AM
The Hornady #6 manual has pressure-tested load data for their 100gr FMJ-RN Encapsulated bullet in the 9mm Luger. They used a COL of 1.085", but I might go a little shorter than that in order to get more case tension on the bullet. A COL of 1.045" would seat the bullet about .175" in the case, which should be more than sufficient to hold the bullet in place. Of course you'd need to reduce these loads a bit to compensate for the shorter COL.

Here's the scanned page from the manual:

http://img683.imageshack.us/img683/7008/hornady100grfmjin9mm.jpg

Walkalong
November 5, 2009, 10:13 AM
.356 bullets will work fine in 9MM. 100 Gr is light, but then they make 88 Gr JHP's for 9MM as well. I have some. If there isn't any data for 100 Gr bullets with 9MM, just use 115 Gr data. Use an O.A.L. that feeds in your guns and go from there. RidgwayCO make a great point about having enough bullet in the case for good neck tension.

loadedround
November 5, 2009, 10:19 AM
9 mm and 380 bullets within their respective weight range are interchageable. Remember in the European countries call the 380 ACP the 9 mm Corto(Corto meaning short). The .001" difference won't a difference in this case.

loadedround
November 5, 2009, 10:25 AM
9 mm and 380 bullets within their respective weight range are interchageable. Remember in the European countries call the 380 ACP the 9 mm Corto(Corto meaning short). The .001" difference won't a difference in this case. However checking both my Nosler #6 Manual and Speer #14 Manual, all 380 bullets are shown to be .355" in diameter, same as the 9MM. Moot point!

rcmodel
November 5, 2009, 12:04 PM
Diameter for 9mm is 0.355
Dia. for 380 is 0.356Actually, it's not.

Both the .380 & 9mm use the exact same size .355" jacketed bullets and .356" lead bullets.

rc

Walkalong
November 5, 2009, 12:10 PM
He may have been thinking of the .38 Super.

Galil5.56
November 5, 2009, 12:34 PM
Remington specs their non GS ".380" bullets @ .356", Super-Vel spec'd .3555" for theirs, and Hornady HAP specs .356" for their "9mm" bullets...

Deflexor
November 9, 2009, 07:25 AM
Regarding Cartridge Overall Length

I don't know if this will help anyone with anything but here it is.

I aquired 500 9mm fmj 124 gr bullets of an unknown manufacture and needed to determine the OAL for a load with this bullet. With hand gun cartridges it is crucial that you not press the bullets too deeply or you will get very high pressures because of the limited space, particularly with a load that nearly fills the case or a compressed load. (not as bad with some of the long brass calibers)

I had some Speer 9mm 124 gr GDHP and the COL on those is 1.120. The bullet itself is 0.565 and the trimmed brass is 0.745, If you add these two lengths together (1.310) and subtract the COL you get the bullet seating depth for the 9mm which is 0.190. Now with this number and the measurement of the new bullets (0.597) you can determine the COL for the new rounds, in this case 1.150. I later determined that these are Hornady and the reloading data confirms my figures.

NuJudge
November 9, 2009, 07:46 AM
My observation is that a lot of 9mm Parabellum barrels have groove diameters of .357" and .358". My 1968-era P38 and Beretta 92SF are examples. If such a barrel is fired with .356" bullets, one will probably get a lot of Lead blown off the sides of the bullet and deposited in the bore as Leading.

Some barrels have chambers that will not accept a cartridge loaded with a large enough bullet to fit the groove diameter. If so, you are limited to jacketed bullets.

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