How successful would I be if...?


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Big_E
November 6, 2009, 11:46 AM
I came up with the idea to make a .22lr M1 Garand. Obviously, .22lr AR's and other military look alikes seem to sell well enough, like the GSG products.

So, the rifle would probably come in 3/4th size and full size model. Of course the action would represent the real garand one on a smaller scale, but with the necessary changes to make it work with a rimmed cartridge.

I also thought up clips to use, they would most likely be like striper clips because IIRC, it is difficult to have a staggered magazine w/ rimfire. Of course, the clips would hold 8 rounds but then they could always sell +/- the 8 round standard, and the signature "PING" would definitely be built into the design.

I know Iver Johnson made a M1 carbine in .22lr but I dont know how well that turned out, but this is a garand so... c'mon. What do you guys think? Would you buy one? two? ten?

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benzy2
November 6, 2009, 11:58 AM
It would depend on a lot of things. The execution is a huge factor. If the rifle feels cheap, isn't reliable, and isn't at least reasonably accurate it would be a tough sell. Price is another issue. You would have to keep the price tag around the $500 mark. Even $500 buys you a CMP Garand these days so you have to watch out there or people will just buy the real thing. I love the idea though. I would like to get some more range time with my Garand but ammo seems to be a bit of an issue these days. I'm not one to spend a ton of money on a .22lr swap though. I would rather buy the real deal, handload some cheap ammo, and feel the real thing.

highorder
November 6, 2009, 12:10 PM
I have seen a few 10/22's converted, or "dropped" into an M1 stock.
They looked pretty good, but at the end of the day it's an expensive 10/22.

Big_E
November 6, 2009, 12:11 PM
Ah yes, price. I'm sure if I was able to get a decent operation going I could sell them for around $400-500. I wouldn't want to overcharge anyone, cause I don't like paying a lot for firearms, especially .22's

Now, there would be other models, (different metal finish, different wood, etc.) But I would never do such a blasphemous thing and put one in a synthetic stock. I don't have any machining or "expert" gunsmithing experience, Im just a guy w/ too much time on my hands and likes to think about things. But if I can get a decent following, then i might actually pursue this.

eye5600
November 6, 2009, 12:36 PM
I wouldn't want to overcharge anyone, cause I don't like paying a lot for firearms, especially .22's.

This is not the attitude of the successful businessman.

I don't mean that everyone in business wants to overcharge for their products, rather that, if you know business, you know how difficult to get a product on the market at a price that allows you to make money. All those jokes about "How do you make a million dollars in (name business here)? Start with $10 million." have a basis in truth.

Big_E
November 6, 2009, 12:50 PM
What I meant was, as long as I could put out a good product at a good price then I would do it. If it costs me $200 to make the rifle I would sell it for $400 or whatever a good market price, but if it cost me $400 to make and sell it for $800 then I would just skip it. I have overcharged people when selling computers and electronics, its just how much I would overcharge.

I don't think a lot of people would pay $800 for a replica Garand.

highorder
November 6, 2009, 01:16 PM
I don't think a lot of people would pay $800 for a replica Garand.


The will in 5-10 years when you can't have an authentic one for less than $2000!

Iron Sight
November 6, 2009, 01:22 PM
http://www.rifleshootermag.com/gunsmithing/RS_ww10-22_200908/index.html

Big_E
November 6, 2009, 01:44 PM
Thanks IronSight, but those are just 10/22's with a different skin. This would actually be similar to a Garand in the loading, operation, etc...

When Garands disappear from the market, then perhaps I cold justify charging a higher amount, but w/ the CMP as main competition right now the price would have to be comparable.

RockyMtnTactical
November 6, 2009, 01:46 PM
How would you do a Garand .22? Seems like an M14 .22 would be easier to do...

Big_E
November 6, 2009, 01:49 PM
An, M14 is another option as well, seems like it would be easier to configure w/ detachable mags, the only thing confusing me is how I could get en bloc clips to work w/ rimfire.

eye5600
November 6, 2009, 05:51 PM
FWIW, my observation is that all, or almost all, the manufacturers use a blow-back action for their .22lrs, even the ones modeled after more exotic guns. The "AR-ness" of the Ruger SR-22, S&W M&P 15-22, etc, is mostly cosmetic. Or, perhaps I should say, mostly exterior.

Which leads me to think you may find it difficult to copy the Garand action.

Quoheleth
November 6, 2009, 10:04 PM
What about using the M1 Carbine as your base? It's already down-scaled. I would think it's size about right for a .22. You might even find a reasonable source for stocks already made (save a step & dollar by not reinventing a wheel).

Q

otcconan
February 20, 2010, 12:15 PM
One of the writers for Gun Digest built both a Garand and a M-1 Carbine from 10/22s. Apparently it was not too difficult and didn't require a lot of machining.

Yep, it's an expensive 10/22 but the ammo is cheap.

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